convert pdf to tiff c# : Add signature to pdf reader SDK control service wpf web page windows dnn Python%20How%20to%20Program%2020022-part1703

Chapter 1
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
19
destructors in base classes and derived classes, and software engineering with inheritance.
This chapter compares various object-oriented relationships, such as inheritance and com-
position. Inheritance leads to programming techniques that highlight one of Python’s most
powerful built-in features—polymorphism. When many classes are related through inher-
itance to a common base class, each derived-class object may be treated as a base-class in-
stance. This enables programs to be written in a general manner independent of the specific
types of the derived-class objects. New kinds of objects can be handled by the same pro-
gram, thus making systems more extensible. This style of programming is commonly used
to implement today’s popular graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The chapter concludes
with a discussion of the new object-oriented programming techniques available in Python
version 2.2.
Chapter 10—Graphical User Interface Components: Part 1
Chapter 10 introduces 
Tkinter
, a module that provides a Python interface to the popular
Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (Tcl/Tk) graphical-user-interface (GUI) toolkit. The
chapter begins with a detailed overview of the 
Tkinter
module. Using 
Tkinter
, the
programmer can create graphical programs quickly and easily. We illustrate several basic
Tkinter
components
Label
Button
Entry
Checkbutton
and 
Radio-
button
. We discuss the concept of event-handling that is central to GUI programming
and present examples that show how to handle mouse and keyboard events in GUI appli-
cations. We conclude the chapter with a more in-depth examination of the 
pack
grid
and 
place
Tk layout managers. The exercises ask the reader to use the concepts presented
in the chapter to create practical applications, such as a program that allows the user to con-
vert temperature values between scales. Another exercise asks the reader to create a GUI
calculator. After completing this chapter, the reader should be able to understand most
Tkinter
applications.
Chapter 11—Graphical User Interface Components: Part 2
Chapter 11 discusses  additional GUI-programming topics. We introduce module 
Pmw
,
which extends the basic Tk GUI widget set. We show how to create menus, popup menus,
scrolled text boxes and windows. The examples demonstrate copying text from one win-
dow to another, allowing the user to select and display images, changing the text font and
changing the background color of a window. Of particular interest is the 35-line program
that allows the user to draw pictures on a 
Canvas
component with a mouse. The chapter
concludes with a discussion of alternative GUI toolkits available to the Python program-
mer, including 
pyGTK
pyOpenGL
and 
wxWindows
. One of the chapter exercises asks
the reader to enhance the temperature-conversion example from the previous chapter. A
second exercise asks the reader to create a simple program that draws a shape on the screen.
In another exercise, the reader fills the shape with a color selected from menu. Many exam-
ples throughout the remainder of the book use the GUI techniques shown in Chapters 10
and 11. After completing Chapters 10 and 11, the reader will be prepared to write the GUI
portions of programs that perform database operations, networking tasks and simple games.
Chapter 12—Exception Handling
This chapter enables the programmer to write programs that are more robust, more fault tol-
erant and more appropriate for business-critical and mission-critical environments. We be-
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 19  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
Add signature to pdf reader - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
sign pdf online; adding signature to pdf file
Add signature to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
add signature pdf preview; create a pdf signature file
20
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
Chapter 1
gin the chapter with an explanation of exception-handling techniques. We then discuss
when exception handling is appropriate and introduce the basics of exception handling with
try
/
except
/
else
statements in an example that gracefully handles the fatal logic error
of dividing by zero. The programmer can raise exceptions specifically using the
raise
statement; we discuss the syntax of this statement and demonstrate its use. The chapter ex-
plains how to extract information from exceptions and how and when to raise exceptions.
We explain the 
finally
statement and provide a detailed explanation of when and where
exceptions are caught in programs. In Python, exceptions are classes. We discuss how ex-
ceptions relate to classes by examining the exception hierarchy and how to create custom
exceptions. The chapter concludes with an example that takes advantage of the capabilities
of module 
traceback
to examine the nature and contents of Python exceptions. 
Chapter 13—String Manipulation and Regular Expressions
This chapter explores how to manipulate string appearance, order and contents. Strings
form the basis of most Python output. The chapter discussion includes methods 
count
,
find
and 
index
, which search strings for substrings. Method 
split
breaks a string into
a list of strings. Method 
replace
replaces a substring of a string with another substring.
These methods provide basic text manipulation capabilities, but programmers often require
more powerful pattern-based text manipulation. The 
re
regular-expression module pro-
vides pattern-based text manipulation in Python. Regular-expression processing can be a
complex subject, with many pitfalls. We present several sections that range from basic reg-
ular expressions to more substantial topics. We point out the most common programming
mistakes and include examples that highlight how these mistakes occur and how to avoid
them. The sections discuss the common functions and classes of module 
re
and the com-
mon regular-expression metacharacters and sequences. We demonstrate grouping, which
enables programmers to retrieve information from regular-expression processing results.
Python regular expressions can be compiled to improve regular-expression processing per-
formance, so we discuss when it is appropriate to do this. The exercises ask the reader to
explore common applications of regular expressions.
Chapter 14—File Processing and Serialization
In this chapter, we discuss the techniques for processing sequential-access and random-ac-
cess text files. The chapter overviews the data hierarchy among bits, bytes, fields, records
and files. Next, Python’s simple view of files and filehandles is presented. Sequential-ac-
cess files are discussed using programs that show how to open and close files, how to store
data sequentially in a file and how to read data sequentially from a file. The examples use
the string-formatting techniques from the previous chapter to output data read from a file.
We include a more substantial program that simulates a credit-inquiry program that re-
trieves data from a sequential-access file and formats the output based on data obtained
from the file. One feature of the chapter is the discussion of how the 
print
statement can
redirect text to an arbitrary file, including the standard error file to which programs display
error messages. Our discussion of random-access files uses module 
shelve
, which pro-
vides a dictionary-like interface to random-access files. We use 
shelve
to create a file for
random access and to read and write data to a 
shelve
file. We include a larger transaction-
processing programming example that employs the techniques discussed in the chapter.
One benefit of Python’s high-level data types and modules is that programs can serialize
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 20  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
By using it in your C# application, you can easily do following things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page.
create signature pdf; pdf sign in
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF
add signature to pdf in preview; export pdf sign in
Chapter 1
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
21
(save to disk) arbitrary Python objects. We present an example that uses module 
cPickle
to store a Python dictionary to disk for later use.
Chapter 15—Extensible Markup Language (XML)
XML is a language for creating markup languages. Unlike HTML, which formats informa-
tion for display, XML structures information. It does not have a fixed set of tags as HTML
does, but instead enables the document author to create new ones. This chapter provides a
brief overview of parsers, which are programs that process XML documents and their data,
and the requirements for a well-formed document (i.e., a document that is syntactically cor-
rect). We also introduce namespaces, which differentiate elements with the same name, and
Document Type Definition (DTD) files and schema files, which provide a structural defini-
tion for an XML document by specifying the type, order, number and attributes of the ele-
ments in an XML document. By defining an XML document’s structure, a DTD or Schema
reduces the validation and error-checking work of the application using the document. This
chapter provides an introduction to an extremely popular XML-related technology—called
the Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL)—for transforming XML documents into other
document formats such as XHTML. This chapter provides an overview of XML; Chapter
16 discusses XML processing in Python.
Chapter 16—XML Processing
In this chapter, we discuss how Python XML processing and manipulation can be accom-
plished simply and powerfully using standard and third-party modules. This chapter over-
views  several  ways  to  process  XML  documents.  The  W3C Document Object Model
(DOM)—an Application Programming Interface (API) for XML that is platform and lan-
guage neutral—is discussed. The DOM API provides a standard set of interfaces (i.e., meth-
ods,  objects, etc.) for manipulating  an XML document’s  contents. XML  documents are
hierarchically structured, thus, the DOM represents XML documents as tree structures. Us-
ing DOM, programs can modify the content, structure and formatting of documents dynam-
ically. We also present an alternative to DOM called the Simple API for XML (SAX). Unlike
DOM, which builds a tree structure in memory, SAX calls specific methods when start tags,
end tags, attributes, etc., are encountered in a document. For this reason, SAX is often re-
ferred  to  as  an event-based API.  Python  XML  support  is  available  through  modules
xml.dom.ext
(DOM) and 
xml.sax
(SAX). In the chapter, we use 4Suite (developed by
FourThought, Inc.) and PyXML—two collections of Python XML modules. The major fea-
ture of this chapter is a case study that uses XML to implement a Web-based message forum.
Chapter 17—Database Application Programming Interface (DB-API)
This chapter enables programs to query and manipulate databases. Most substantial busi-
ness and Web applications are based on database management systems (DBMS). To sup-
port DBMS applications, Python offers the database application programming interface
(DB-API). This chapter uses Structured Query Language (SQL) to query and manipulate
Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), specifically a MySQL database. To
interface with a MySQL database, Python uses module 
MySQLdb
. This chapter contains
three examples. The first is a CGI program that displays information about authors, based
on criteria provided by the user. The second creates a GUI program that allows the user to
enter an SQL query, then displays the results of the query. The third example is a more sub-
stantial GUI program that enables the user to maintain a list of contacts. The user can add,
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 21  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
By using it in your VB.NET application, you can easily do following things. Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file page.
add signature to pdf; pdf signatures
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
". Reading, viewing and editing PDF document can be an easy task if you use PDF Reader Add-on, which can be easily integrated into RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK.
adding signature to pdf form; adding signature to pdf
22
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
Chapter 1
remove, update and find contacts in the database. The exercises ask the reader to modify
these programs to provide more functionality, such as verifying that the database does not
contain identical entries.
Chapter 18—Process Management
In this chapter, we discuss concurrency. Most programming languages provide a simple set
of control structures that enable programmers to perform one action at a time and proceed to
the next action after the previous one is finished. Such control structures do not allow most
programming languages to perform concurrent actions. The kind of concurrency that comput-
ers perform today normally is implemented as operating-system primitives available only to
highly experienced systems programmers. Python makes concurrency primitives available to
application programmers. We show how to use the 
fork
command, which creates a new pro-
cess, and the 
exec
and 
system
commands, which execute separate programs. Techniques
for controlling input and output with the 
popen
command are demonstrated and explained.
Some of these commands are available on the Unix platform only, so we point this out when
appropriate. We also explore Python’s cross-platform capabilities through examples that per-
form specific tasks based on the operating system on which the program is executing. We dis-
cuss methods for communicating between processes, including pipes and signals. The signal-
handling examples demonstrate how to discover when a user tries to interrupt a program and
how to specify an action that the program takes when such an event occurs.
Chapter 19—Multithreading
This chapter introduces threads, which are “light-weight processes.” They often are more
efficient than full-fledged processes created as a result of commands like 
fork
presented
in the previous chapter. We examine basic threading concepts, including the various states
in which a thread can exist throughout its life. We discuss how to include threads in a pro-
gram by subclassing 
threading.Thread
and overriding method 
run
. The latter half
of the chapter contains examples that address the classic producer/consumer relationship.
We develop several solutions to this problem and introduce the concept of thread synchro-
nization and resource allocation. We introduce threading control primitives, such as locks,
condition variables, semaphores and events. The final solution uses module 
Queue
to pro-
tect access to shared data stored  in a queue. The examples demonstrate the hazards of
threaded programs and show how to avoid these hazards. Our solution also demonstrates
the value of writing classes for reuse. We reuse our producer and consumer classes to ac-
cess various synchronized and unsynchronized data types. After completing this chapter,
the reader will have many of the tools necessary to write substantial, extensible and profes-
sional programs in Python.
Chapter 20—Networking
In this chapter, we explore applications that can communicate over computer networks. A
major benefit of a high-level language like Python is that potentially complex topics can be
presented and discussed easily through small, working examples. We discuss basic net-
working concepts and present two examples—a CGI program that displays a chosen Web
page in a browser and a GUI example that displays page content (e.g., XHTML) in a text
area. We also discuss client-server communication over sockets. The programs in this sec-
tion demonstrate how to send and receive messages over the network, using connectionless
and connection-based protocols. A key feature of the chapter is the live-code implementa-
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 22  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET enables you to create signatures to PDF, including freehand signature, text and date signature. If you need to add your own signatures
add jpeg signature to pdf; sign pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create Viewer for C# .NET Signatures supports add signatures to Word and remove signature from Word
create signature field in pdf; copy and paste signature into pdf
Chapter 1
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
23
tion of a collaborative client/server Tic-Tac-Toe game in which two clients play Tic-Tac-
Toe by interacting with a multithreaded server that maintains the state of the game. As part
of the exercises, readers will write programs that send and receive messages and files. We
ask the reader to modify the Tic-Tac-Toe game to determine when a player wins the game.
Chapter 21—Security
This chapter discusses Web programming security issues. Web programming allows the
rapid creation of powerful applications, but it also exposes computers to outside attack. We
focus on defensive programming techniques that help the programmer prevent security
problems by using certain techniques and tools. One of those tools is encryption. We pro-
vide an example of encryption and decryption with module 
rotor
, which acts as a substi-
tution cipher. Another tool is module 
sha
, which is used to hash values. A third tool is
Python’s  restricted-access (
rexec
)  module,  which  creates a  restricted  environment  in
which untrusted code can execute without damaging the local computer. This chapter ex-
amines technologies, such as Public Key CryptographySecure Socket Layer (SSL)digital
signaturesdigital certificatesdigital steganography and biometrics, which provide net-
work security. Other types of network security, such as firewalls and antivirus programs,
are also covered, and common security threats including cryptanalytic attacks, viruses,
worms and Trojan horses are discussed.
Chapter 22—Data Structures
Chapter 22 explores the techniques used to create and manipulate standard data structures in
Python. Although high-level data types are built into Python, we believe the reader will ben-
efit from this conceptual and programmatic examination of common data structures. The
chapter begins with a discussion of self-referential structures and proceeds with a discussion
of how to create and maintain various data structures, including linked lists, queues (or wait-
ing lines), stacks and binary trees. We reuse the linked-list class to implement queues and
stacks, so that the code for the inherited class is minimized and emphasis is placed on code
reuse. The binary tree class contains methods for pre-, in- and post-order traversals. For each
type of data structure, we present complete, working programs and show sample outputs.
Chapter 23—Case Study: Multi-Tier Online Bookstore
This chapter implements an online bookstore that uses MySQL, XML and XSLT to send
Web pages to different clients. We begin the chapter with an introduction to an HTTP-ses-
sion framework that maintains client information over several pages. The client informa-
tion is “pickled” (serialized) on the server’s computer, to be used by the server at a later
time. We then discuss WML, a markup language used by wireless clients to pass documents
over the Web. Although we demonstrate the application with XHTML, XHTML Basic and
WML clients, we designed the bookstore to be extensible, so new client types can be added
easily. The Python CGI programs do not change, but the programmer can modify the book-
store to service new clients by simply creating new XML and XSLT documents for those
clients. The bookstore program determines the client type and sends the appropriate data to
the client. This chapter encompasses many topics from the previous chapters in the book
and illustrates a  major strength of  Python—its  ability to integrate several technologies
quickly  and  easily.  The  topics  covered  include  file  processing,  serialization  (module
cPickle
), CGI form processing (module 
cgi
), database access  (module 
MySQLdb
),
XML DOM manipulation and XSLT processing (the 4Suite set of modules.)
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 23  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
NET program. Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page redaction will be used and customized. PDF Annotation Edit.
add signature to pdf acrobat reader; adding a signature to a pdf in preview
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit
pdf to word converter sign in; pdf signature field
24
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
Chapter 1
Chapter 24—Multimedia
This chapter presents Python’s capabilities for making computer applications come alive.
It is remarkable that students in entry-level programming courses will be writing Python
applications with all these capabilities. Some exciting multimedia applications include Py-
OpenGL, a module that binds Python to OpenGL API to create colorful, interactive graph-
ics; Alice, an environment for creating and manipulating 3D graphical worlds in an object-
oriented manner; and 
Pygame
, a large collection of Python modules for creating cross-
platform, multimedia applications, such as interactive games. In our PyOpenGL examples,
we create rotating objects and three-dimensional shapes. In the Alice example, we create a
graphical game version of a popular riddle. The world we create contains a fox, a chicken
and a plant. The goal is to move all three objects across a river, without leaving a predator-
prey pair alone at any one time. Our first 
Pygame
example combines 
Tkinter
and 
Pyg-
ame
to create a GUI compact disc player. The second example illustrates how to play an
MPEG movie. The final 
Pygame
example creates a video game where the user steers a
spaceship through an asteroid field to gather energy cells. We discuss many graphics pro-
gram pitfalls and techniques in the context of this example. With many other programming
languages, these projects would be too complex or detailed to present in a book such as this.
However,  Python’s  high-level nature,  simple  syntax  and  ample  modules  enable  us  to
present these exciting examples all in the same chapter!
Chapter 25—Python Server Pages (PSP)
In this chapter, we create dynamic Web content using familiar Extensible HyperText Markup
Language (XHTML) syntax and Python scripts. We discuss both sides of a client-server re-
lationship. The tools used in this chapter include Apache and Webware for Python—a suite
of software for writing dynamic Web content. An explanation of Python servlets is presented
at the beginning of this chapter. In addition to illustrating how PSP handles Python’s unique
indentation style, our examples illustrate scriptletsactions and directives. The exercises ask
the reader to modify these examples by adding database connections to PSP.
Appendix A—Operator Precedence Chart
This appendix contains the Python operator precedence chart.
Appendix B—ASCII Character Set
Appendix B contains a table of the 128 ASCII alphanumeric symbols.
Appendix C—Number Systems
Appendix C explains the binary, octal, decimal and hexadecimal number systems. We also
cover how to convert between bases and perform arithmetic operations in each base. 
Appendix D—Python Development Environments
This appendix presents a brief overview of several Python Development environments, in-
cluding IDLE .
Appendix E—Career Resources
This appendix provides resources related to careers in Python and related technologies. The
Internet presents valuable resources and services for job seekers and employers. Automatic
search features allow employees to scan the Web for open positions. Employers also can find
job candidates using the Internet. This reduces the amount of time spent preparing and re-
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 24  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Tiff
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. convert Tiff file to PDF, add annotations to Tiff, Create signature on tiff, etc.
adding signature to pdf doc; pdf sign
.NET Barcode Reader SDK| Scan & Read Barcodes
barcode from document or images with .NET Imaging Barcode Reader, an easy most common document & image formats, including Bitmap, Metafile and PDF are supported
adding a signature to a pdf form; adding a signature to a pdf document
Chapter 1
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
25
viewing resumes, and can minimize travel expenses for distance recruiting and interviewing.
In this chapter, we explore career services on the Web from the perspectives of job seekers
and employers. We introduce comprehensive job sites, industry-specific sites (including sites
geared specifically for Python programmers) and contracting opportunities, as well as addi-
tional resources and career services designed to meet the needs of a variety of individuals.
Appendix F—Unicode®
This appendix introduces the Unicode Standard, an encoding scheme that assigns unique
numeric values to the characters of most of the world’s languages. It includes a Python pro-
gram that uses Unicode encoding to print a welcome message in 10 different languages.
Appendices G and H—Introduction to HyperText Markup Language 4: 1 & 2 (on CD)
These appendices provide an introduction to HTML—the HyperText Markup Language.
HTML is a markup language for describing the elements of an HTML document (Web
page) so that a browser, such as Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, can render (i.e., display) that
page. These appendices are included for our readers who do not know HTML. Some key
topics covered in Appendix G include incorporating text and images in an HTML docu-
ment, linking to  other HTML  documents on the  Web,  incorporating  special characters
(such as copyright and trademark symbols) into an HTML document and separating parts
of an HTML document with horizontal rules. In Appendix H, we discuss more substantial
HTML elements and features. We demonstrate how to present information in lists and ta-
bles. We discuss how to collect information from people browsing a site. We explain how
to use internal linking and image maps to make Web pages easier to navigate. We also dis-
cuss how to use frames to display multiple documents in the browser window.
Appendices I and J—Introduction to XHTML: Part 1 & 2
In these appendices, we introduce the Extensible HyperText Markup Language (XHTML).
XHTML is a W3C technology designed to replace HTML as the primary means of describ-
ing Web content. As an XML-based language, XHTML is more robust and extensible than
HTML. XHTML incorporates most of HTML 4’s elements and attributes—the focus of
these appendices. Appendix I introduces the XHTML and write many simple Web pages.
We introduce basic XHTML tags and attributes. A key issue when using XHTML is the
separation of the presentation of a document (i.e., how the document is rendered on the
screen by a browser) from the structure of that document. Appendix J continues our XHT-
ML discussion with more substantial XHTML elements and features. We demonstrate how
to present information in lists and tables and discuss how to collect information from peo-
ple browsing a site. We explain internal linking  and image maps—techniques that make
Web pages easier to navigate. We show how to use frames to make attractive Web sites.
Appendix K—Cascading Style Sheets™ (CSS)
Appendix K discusses how document authors can control how the browser renders a Web
page. In earlier versions of XHTML, Web browsers controlled the appearance (i.e., the ren-
dering) of every Web page. For example, if a document author placed an 
h1
(i.e., a large
heading) element in a document, the browser rendered the element in its own manner, which
was often different than the way other Web browsers would render the same document. Cas-
cading Style Sheets (CSS) technology allows document authors to specify the styles of their
page elements (spacing, margins, etc.) separately from the structure of their documents (sec-
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 25  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
26
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
Chapter 1
tion headers, body text, links, etc.). This separation of structure from content allows greater
manageability and makes changing the style of the document easier and faster.
Appendix L—Accessibility
This appendix discusses how to design accessible Web sites. Currently, the World Wide
Web presents  challenges  to people with  various disabilities.  Multimedia-rich Web  sites
hinder text readers and other programs designed to help people with visual impairments, and
the increasing amount of audio on the Web is inaccessible to people with hearing impair-
ments. To rectify this situation, the federal government has issued several key legislation
that address Web accessibility. For example, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) pro-
hibits discrimination on the basis of a disability. The W3C started the Web Accessibility Ini-
tiative (WAI), which provides guidelines describing how to make Web sites accessible to
people with various impairments. This chapter provides a description of these methods, such
as use of the 
<headers>
tag to make tables more accessible to page readers, use of the 
alt
attribute of the 
<img>
tag to describe images, and the proper use of XHTML and related
technologies to ensure that a page can be viewed on any type of display or reader. VoiceXML
also can increase accessibility with speech synthesis and recognition.
Appendix M—HTML/XHTML Special Characters (on CD)
This appendix provides many commonly used HTML/XHTML special characters, called
character entity references
Appendix N—HTML/XHTML Colors (on CD)
This appendix lists commonly used HTML/XHTML color names and their corresponding
hexadecimal values.
Appendix O—Additional Python 2.2 Features
This book was published as the release of Python 2.2 was impending. We integrated many
Python 2.2 features throughout the book. However, there were a few features that we were
unable to insert in the text. We assembled these additional features into Appendix O. As
you read each chapter, peak ahead to Appendix O for additional discussions and live-code
examples. 
Resources on Our Web Site
Our Web site, 
www.deitel.com
, provides a number of Python-related resources to help
you install and configure Python on your Windows or UNIX/Linux systems. The resources
include Installing Python , Installing the Apache Web ServerInstalling MySQL , Installing
Database Application Programming Interface (DB-API) modules, Installing Webware for
Python and Installing Third-Party Modules.
Well, there you have it! We have worked hard to create this book and its optional inter-
active multimedia Cyber Classroom. The book is loaded with hundreds of working, Live-
Code™ examples, programming tips, self-review exercises and answers, challenging exer-
cises and projects and numerous study aids to help you master the material. The technolo-
gies we introduce will help you write Web-based applications quickly and effectively. As
you read the book, if something is not clear, or if you find an error, please write to us at
deitel@deitel.com
. We will respond promptly, and we will post corrections  and
clarifications at 
www.deitel.com
.
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 26  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
Chapter 1
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
27
Prentice Hall maintains 
www.prenhall.com/deitel
—a Web site dedicated to
our Prentice Hall textbooks, multimedia packages and Web-based training products. The
site contains “Companion Web Sites” for each of our books that include frequently asked
questions (FAQs), downloads, errata, updates, self-test questions and other resources.
Deitel & Associates, Inc., contributes a weekly column to the popular InformIT  news-
letter, currently subscribed to by more than 800,000 IT professionals worldwide. For opt-
in registration, visit 
www.InformIT.com
Deitel & Associates, Inc. also offers a free, opt-in newsletter that includes commentary
on industry trends and developments, links to articles and resources from published books
and upcoming publications, information on future publications, product-release schedules
and more. For opt-in registration, visit 
www.deitel.com
.
You  are about  to  start  on a  challenging  and rewarding  path.  We  hope  you enjoy
learning with Python How to Program as much as we enjoyed writing it! 
1.18 Int
e
rn
e
a
n
d
W
o
rl
d
Wi
de
W
eb
R
e
s
o
ur
ce
s
www.python.org
This site is the first place to look for information about Python. The Python home page provides up-
to-date news, a FAQ, and a collection of links to Python resources on the Internet including Python
software, tutorials, user groups and demos.
www.zope.com
www.zope.org
Zope is an extensible, open-source Web application server written in Python. It was created by Digital
Creations—the company where the Python development team resides.
www.activestate.com
ActiveState creates open-source tools for programmers. The company provides a Python distribution
called ActivePython and Komodo, an open-source Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for
many languages, including Python, XML, Tcl and PHP. ActiveState supplies Python tools for Win-
dows and a collection of Python programs called the Python Cookbook.
homepage.ntlworld.com/tibsnjoan/python.html
This page contains many links to people and groups that develop and use Python. 
www.ddj.com/topics/pythonurl/
Dr. Dobb’s Journal, a programming publication, maintains a list of Python links at this site.
SUMMARY
[Note: Because this Section 1.17 is primarily a summary of the rest of the book, we do not provide
summary bullets for that section.]
• Software controls computers (often referred to as hardware).
• A computer is a device capable of performing computations and making logical decisions at
speeds millions, even billions, of times faster than human beings can. 
• Computers process data under the control of sets of instructions called computer programs. These
computer programs guide the computer through orderly sets of actions specified by people called
computer programmers.
• The various devices that comprise a computer system (such as the keyboard, screen, disks, mem-
ory and processing units) are referred to as hardware. 
• The computer programs that run on a computer are referred to as software. 
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 27  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
28
Introduction to Computers, Internet and World Wide Web
Chapter 1
• The input unit is the “receiving” section of the computer. It obtains information (data and comput-
er programs) from various input devices and places this information at the disposal of the other
units so that the information may be processed. 
• The output unit is the “shipping” section of the computer. It takes information processed by the
computer and places it on output devices to make it available for use outside the computer. 
• The memory unit is the rapid access, relatively low-capacity “warehouse” section of the computer.
It retains information that has been entered through the input unit so that the information may be
made immediately available for processing when it is needed and retains information that has al-
ready been processed until that information can be placed on output devices by the output unit. 
• The arithmetic and logic unit (ALU) is the “manufacturing” section of the computer. It is respon-
sible for performing calculations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and for
making decisions. 
• The central processing unit (CPU) is the “administrative” section of the computer. It is the com-
puter’s coordinator and is responsible for supervising the operation of the other sections. 
• The secondary storage unit is the long-term, high-capacity “warehousing” section of the computer.
Programs or data not being used by the other units are normally placed on secondary storage de-
vices (such as disks) until they are needed, possibly hours, days, months or even years later.
• Early computers were capable of performing only one job or task at a time. This form of computer
operation often is called single-user batch processing. 
• Software systems called operating systems were developed to help make it more convenient to use
computers. Early operating systems managed the smooth transition between jobs and minimized
the time it took for computer operators to switch between jobs.
• Multiprogramming involves the “simultaneous” operation of many jobs on the computer—the
computer shares its resources among the jobs competing for its attention. 
• Timesharing is a special case of multiprogramming in which dozens or even hundreds of users
share a computer through terminals. The computer runs a small portion of one user’s job, then
moves on to service the next user. The computer does this so quickly that it might provide service
to each user several times per second, so programs appear to run simultaneously. 
• An advantage of timesharing is that the user receives almost immediate responses to requests rath-
er than having to wait long periods for results, as with previous modes of computing. 
• In 1977, Apple Computer popularized the phenomenon of personal computing. 
• In 1981, IBM introduced the IBM Personal Computer, legitimizing personal computing in busi-
ness, industry and government organizations.
• Although early personal computers were not powerful enough to timeshare several users, these
machines could be linked together in computer networks, sometimes over telephone lines and
sometimes in local area networks (LANs) within an organization. This led to the phenomenon of
distributed computing, in which an organization’s computing is distributed over networks to the
sites at which the real work of the organization is performed. 
• Today, information is shared easily across computer networks, where some computers called file
servers offer a common store of programs and data that may be used by client computers distrib-
uted throughout the network—hence the term client/server computing.
• Computer languages may be divided into three general types: machine languages, assembly lan-
guages and high-level languages.
• Any computer can directly understand only its own machine language. Machine languages gener-
ally consist of strings of numbers (ultimately reduced to 1s and 0s) that instruct computers to per-
form their most elementary operations one at a time. Machine languages are machine dependent. 
pythonhtp1_01.fm  Page 28  Monday, December 10, 2001  12:13 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested