c# convert pdf to tiff : Click to sign pdf Library software component .net windows web page mvc pcb333-part425

def visit_Sub(selfnode):
return self.visit(node.left) - self.visit(node.right)
def visit_Mul(selfnode):
return self.visit(node.left) * self.visit(node.right)
def visit_Div(selfnode):
return self.visit(node.left) / self.visit(node.right)
def visit_Negate(selfnode):
return -self.visit(node.operand)
if __name__ == '__main__':
# 1 + 2*(3-4) / 5
t1 = Sub(Number(3), Number(4))
t2 = Mul(Number(2), t1)
t3 = Div(t2Number(5))
t4 = Add(Number(1), t3)
# Evaluate it
e = Evaluator()
print(e.visit(t4))     # Outputs 0.6
The preceding code works for simple expressions. However, the implementation of
Evaluator uses recursion and crashes if things get too nested. For example:
>>> a = Number(0)
>>> for n in range(1100000):
...     a = Add(aNumber(n))
...
>>> e = Evaluator()
>>> e.visit(a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
File "visitor.py", line 29, in _visit
return meth(node)
File "visitor.py", line 67, in visit_Add
return self.visit(node.left+ self.visit(node.right)
RuntimeErrormaximum recursion depth exceeded
>>>
Now let’s change the Evaluator class ever so slightly to the following:
class Evaluator(NodeVisitor):
def visit_Number(selfnode):
return node.value
def visit_Add(selfnode):
yield (yield node.left+ (yield node.right)
def visit_Sub(selfnode):
yield (yield node.left- (yield node.right)
8.22. Implementing the Visitor Pattern Without Recursion  |  313
Click to sign pdf - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
pdf signature; create a pdf signature file
Click to sign pdf - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
sign pdf online; add jpg signature to pdf
def visit_Mul(selfnode):
yield (yield node.left* (yield node.right)
def visit_Div(selfnode):
yield (yield node.left/ (yield node.right)
def visit_Negate(selfnode):
yield -(yield node.operand)
If you try the same recursive experiment, you’ll find that it suddenly works. It’s magic!
>>> a = Number(0)
>>> for n in range(1,100000):
...     a = Add(aNumber(n))
...
>>> e = Evaluator()
>>> e.visit(a)
4999950000
>>>
If you want to add custom processing into any of the methods, it still works. For example:
class Evaluator(NodeVisitor):
...
def visit_Add(selfnode):
print('Add:'node)
lhs = yield node.left
print('left='lhs)
rhs = yield node.right
print('right='rhs)
yield lhs + rhs
...
Here is some sample output:
>>> e = Evaluator()
>>> e.visit(t4)
Add: <__main__.Add object at 0x1006a8d90>
left= 1
right= -0.4
0.6
>>>
Discussion
This recipe nicely illustrates how generators and coroutines can perform mind-bending
tricks involving program control flow, often to great advantage. To understand this
recipe, a few key insights are required.
First, in problems related to tree traversal, a common implementation strategy for
avoiding recursion is to write algorithms involving a stack or queue. For example, depth-
first traversal can be implemented entirely by pushing nodes onto a stack when first
encountered and then popping them off once processing has finished. The central core
314  |  Chapter 8: Classes and Objects
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
When viewing PDF document on web viewer, users can click rotation button To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK
adding a signature to a pdf in preview; add signature to pdf reader
How to C#: Quick to Start Using XImage.Raster
Add a new Form Item to the project, and choose to design mode sign. Make the ToolBox view show. Right click the ToolBox panel, and select “Choose Items
add signature to pdf online; add signature box to pdf
of the visit() method in the solution is built around this idea. The algorithm starts by
pushing the initial node onto the stack list and runs until the stack is empty. During
execution, the stack will grow according to the depth of the underlying tree structure.
The second insight concerns the behavior of the yield statement in generators. When
yield is encountered, the behavior of a generator is to emit a value and to suspend. This
recipe uses this as a replacement for recursion. For example, instead of writing a recur‐
sive expression like this:
value = self.visit(node.left)
you replace it with the following:
value = yield node.left
Behind the scenes, this sends the node in question (node.left) back to the visit()
method. The visit() method then carries out the execution of the appropriate vis
it_Name() method for that node. In some sense, this is almost the opposite of recursion.
That is, instead of calling visit() recursively to move the algorithm forward, the yield
statement is being used to temporarily back out of the computation in progress. Thus,
the yield is essentially a signal that tells the algorithm that the yielded node needs to
be processed first before further progress can be made.
The final part of this recipe concerns propagation of results. When generator functions
are used, you can no longer use return statements to emit values (doing so will cause
SyntaxError exception). Thus, the yield statement has to do double duty to cover
the case. In this recipe, if the value produced by a yield statement is a non-Node type,
it is assumed to be a value that will be propagated to the next step of the calculation.
This is the purpose of the last_return variable in the code. Typically, this would hold
the last value yielded by a visit method. That value would then be sent into the previously
executing method, where it would show up as the return value from a yield statement.
For example, in this code:
value = yield node.left
The value variable gets the value of last_return, which is the result returned by the
visitor method invoked for node.left.
All of these aspects of the recipe are found in this fragment of code:
try:
last = stack[-1]
if isinstance(last, types.GeneratorType):
stack.append(last.send(last_result))
last_result = None
elif isinstance(lastNode):
stack.append(self._visit(stack.pop()))
else:
last_result = stack.pop()
8.22. Implementing the Visitor Pattern Without Recursion  |  315
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Item to the project, and choose to design mode sign. Right click the ToolBox panel, and select “Choose Items…”, in
pdf signature field; adding signature to pdf form
How to C#: Create a Winforms Control
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Item to the project, and choose to design mode sign. Right click the ToolBox panel, and select "Choose Items", in
pdf create signature; pdf will signature
except StopIteration:
stack.pop()
The code works by simply looking at the top of the stack and deciding what to do next.
If it’s a generator, then its send() method is invoked with the last result (if any) and the
result appended onto the stack for further processing. The value returned by send() is
the same value that was given to the yield statement. Thus, in a statement such as yield
node.left, the Node instance node.left is returned by send() and placed on the top
of the stack.
If the top of the stack is a Node instance, then it is replaced by the result of calling the
appropriate visit method for that node. This is where the underlying recursion is being
eliminated. Instead of the various visit methods directly calling visit() recursively, it
takes place here. As long as the methods use yield, it all works out.
Finally, if the top of the stack is anything else, it’s assumed to be a return value of some
kind. It just gets popped off the stack and placed into last_result. If the next item on
the stack is a generator, then it gets sent in as a return value for the yield. It should be
noted that the final return value of visit() is also set to last_result. This is what
makes this recipe work with a traditional recursive implementation. If no generators
are being used, this value simply holds the value given to any return statements used
in the code.
One potential danger of this recipe concerns the distinction between yielding Node and
non-Node values. In the implementation, all Node instances are automatically traversed.
This means that you can’t use a Node as a return value to be propagated. In practice, this
may not matter. However, if it does, you might need to adapt the algorithm slightly. For
example, possibly by introducing another class into the mix, like this:
class Visit:
def __init__(selfnode):
self.node = node
class NodeVisitor:
def visit(selfnode):
stack = [ Visit(node) ]
last_result = None
while stack:
try:
last = stack[-1]
if isinstance(last, types.GeneratorType):
stack.append(last.send(last_result))
last_result = None
elif isinstance(lastVisit):
stack.append(self._visit(stack.pop().node))
else:
last_result = stack.pop()
except StopIteration:
316  |  Chapter 8: Classes and Objects
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Purchase information
XDoc.PDF. View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. also accept other payment channels, like, PayPal, Purchase Order & Wire Transfers.Please click to send
add signature block to pdf; adding signature to pdf document
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office such a control button, with a single click, you can
create pdf signature; export pdf to word sign in
stack.pop()
return last_result
def _visit(selfnode):
methname = 'visit_' + type(node).__name__
meth = getattr(selfmethnameNone)
if meth is None:
meth = self.generic_visit
return meth(node)
def generic_visit(self, node):
raise RuntimeError('No {} method'.format('visit_' + type(node).__name__))
With this implementation, the various visitor methods would now look like this:
class Evaluator(NodeVisitor):
...
def visit_Add(selfnode):
yield (yield Visit(node.left)) + (yield Visit(node.right))
def visit_Sub(selfnode):
yield (yield Visit(node.left)) - (yield Visit(node.right))
...
Having seen this recipe, you might be inclined to investigate a solution that doesn’t
involve yield. However, doing so will lead to code that has to deal with many of the
same issues presented here. For example, to eliminate recursion, you’ll need to maintain
a stack. You’ll also need to come up with some scheme for managing the traversal and
invoking various visitor-related logic. Without generators, this code ends up being a
very messy mix of stack manipulation, callback functions, and other constructs. Frankly,
the main benefit of using yield is that you can write nonrecursive code in an elegant
style that looks almost exactly like the recursive implementation.
8.23. Managing Memory in Cyclic Data Structures
Problem
Your program creates data structures with cycles (e.g., trees, graphs, observer patterns,
etc.), but you are experiencing problems with memory management.
Solution
A simple example of a cyclic data structure is a tree structure where a parent points to
its children and the children point back to their parent. For code like this, you should
consider making one of the links a weak reference using the weakref library. For
example:
8.23. Managing Memory in Cyclic Data Structures  |  317
import weakref
class Node:
def __init__(selfvalue):
self.value = value
self._parent = None
self.children = []
def __repr__(self):
return 'Node({!r:})'.format(self.value)
# property that manages the parent as a weak-reference
@property
def parent(self):
return self._parent if self._parent is None else self._parent()
@parent.setter
def parent(selfnode):
self._parent = weakref.ref(node)
def add_child(selfchild):
self.children.append(child)
child.parent = self
This implementation allows the parent to quietly die. For example:
>>> root = Node('parent')
>>> c1 = Node('child')
>>> root.add_child(c1)
>>> print(c1.parent)
Node('parent')
>>> del root
>>> print(c1.parent)
None
>>>
Discussion
Cyclic data structures are a somewhat tricky aspect of Python that require careful study
because the usual rules of garbage collection often don’t apply. For example, consider
this code:
# Class just to illustrate when deletion occurs
class Data:
def __del__(self):
print('Data.__del__')
# Node class involving a cycle
class Node:
def __init__(self):
self.data = Data()
self.parent = None
318  |  Chapter 8: Classes and Objects
self.children = []
def add_child(selfchild):
self.children.append(child)
child.parent = self
Now, using this code, try some experiments to see some subtle issues with garbage
collection:
>>> a = Data()
>>> del a               # Immediately deleted
Data.__del__
>>> a = Node()
>>> del a               # Immediately deleted
Data.__del__
>>> a = Node()
>>> a.add_child(Node())
>>> del a               # Not deleted (no message)
>>>
As you can see, objects are deleted immediately all except for the last case involving a
cycle. The reason is that Python’s garbage collection is based on simple reference count‐
ing. When the reference count of an object reaches 0, it is immediately deleted. For
cyclic data structures, however, this never happens. Thus, in the last part of the example,
the parent and child nodes refer to each other, keeping the reference count nonzero.
To deal with cycles, there is a separate garbage collector that runs periodically. However,
as a general rule, you never know when it might run. Consequently, you never really
know when cyclic data structures might get collected. If necessary, you can force garbage
collection, but doing so is a bit clunky:
>>> import gc
>>> gc.collect()     # Force collection
Data.__del__
Data.__del__
>>>
An even worse problem occurs if the objects involved in a cycle define their own
__del__() method. For example, suppose the code looked like this:
# Class just to illustrate when deletion occurs
class Data:
def __del__(self):
print('Data.__del__')
# Node class involving a cycle
class Node:
def __init__(self):
self.data = Data()
self.parent = None
self.children = []
# NEVER DEFINE LIKE THIS.
8.23. Managing Memory in Cyclic Data Structures  |  319
# Only here to illustrate pathological behavior
def __del__(self):
del self.data
del.parent
del.children
def add_child(selfchild):
self.children.append(child)
child.parent = self
In this case, the data structures will never be garbage collected at all and your program
will leak memory! If you try it, you’ll see that the Data.__del__ message never appears
at all—even after a forced garbage collection:
>>> a = Node()
>>> a.add_child(Node()
>>> del a             # No message (not collected)
>>> import gc
>>> gc.collect()      # No message (not collected)
>>>
Weak references solve this problem by eliminating reference cycles. Essentially, a weak
reference is a pointer to an object that does not increase its reference count. You create
weak references using the weakref library. For example:
>>> import weakref
>>> a = Node()
>>> a_ref = weakref.ref(a)
>>> a_ref
<weakref at 0x100581f70; to 'Node' at 0x1005c5410>
>>>
To dereference a weak reference, you call it like a function. If the referenced object still
exists, it is returned. Otherwise, None is returned. Since the reference count of the orig‐
inal object wasn’t increased, it can be deleted normally. For example:
>>> print(a_ref())
<__main__.Node object at 0x1005c5410>
>>> del a
Data.__del__
>>> print(a_ref())
None
>>>
By using weak references, as shown in the solution, you’ll find that there are no longer
any reference cycles and that garbage collection occurs immediately once a node is no
longer being used. See Recipe 8.25 for another example involving weak references.
320  |  Chapter 8: Classes and Objects
8.24. Making Classes Support Comparison Operations
Problem
You’d like to be able to compare instances of your class using the standard comparison
operators (e.g., >=, !=<=, etc.), but without having to write a lot of special methods.
Solution
Python classes can support comparison by implementing a special method for each
comparison operator. For example, to support the >= operator, you define a __ge__()
method in the classes. Although defining a single method is usually no problem, it
quickly gets tedious to create implementations of every possible comparison operator.
The functools.total_ordering decorator can be used to simplify this process. To use
it, you decorate a class with it, and define __eq__() and one other comparison method
(__lt____le__, __gt__, or __ge__). The decorator then fills in the other comparison
methods for you.
As an example, let’s build some houses and add some rooms to them, and then perform
comparisons based on the size of the houses:
from functools import total_ordering
class Room:
def __init__(selfnamelength, width):
self.name = name
self.length = length
self.width = width
self.square_feet = self.length * self.width
@total_ordering
class House:
def __init__(selfnamestyle):
self.name = name
self.style = style
self.rooms = list()
@property
def living_space_footage(self):
return sum(r.square_feet for r in self.rooms)
def add_room(selfroom):
self.rooms.append(room)
def __str__(self):
return '{}: {} square foot {}'.format(self.name,
self.living_space_footage,
self.style)
8.24. Making Classes Support Comparison Operations  |  321
def __eq__(selfother):
return self.living_space_footage == other.living_space_footage
def __lt__(selfother):
return self.living_space_footage < other.living_space_footage
Here, the House class has been decorated with @total_ordering. Definitions of
__eq__() and __lt__() are provided to compare houses based on the total square
footage of their rooms. This minimum definition is all that is required to make all of
the other comparison operations work. For example:
# Build a few houses, and add rooms to them
h1 = House('h1''Cape')
h1.add_room(Room('Master Bedroom'1421))
h1.add_room(Room('Living Room'1820))
h1.add_room(Room('Kitchen'1216))
h1.add_room(Room('Office'1212))
h2 = House('h2''Ranch')
h2.add_room(Room('Master Bedroom'1421))
h2.add_room(Room('Living Room'1820))
h2.add_room(Room('Kitchen'1216))
h3 = House('h3''Split')
h3.add_room(Room('Master Bedroom'1421))
h3.add_room(Room('Living Room'1820))
h3.add_room(Room('Office'1216))
h3.add_room(Room('Kitchen'1517))
houses = [h1h2h3]
print('Is h1 bigger than h2?'h1 > h2# prints True
print('Is h2 smaller than h3?'h2 < h3# prints True
print('Is h2 greater than or equal to h1?'h2 >= h1# Prints False
print('Which one is biggest?'max(houses)) # Prints 'h3: 1101-square-foot Split'
print('Which is smallest?'min(houses)) # Prints 'h2: 846-square-foot Ranch'
Discussion
If you’ve written the code to make a class support all of the basic comparison operators,
then total_ordering probably doesn’t seem all that magical: it literally defines a map‐
ping from each of the comparison-supporting methods to all of the other ones that
would be required. So, if you defined __lt__() in your class as in the solution, it is used
to build all of the other comparison operators. It’s really just filling in the class with
methods like this:
class House:
def __eq__(selfother):
...
def __lt__(selfother):
...
322  |  Chapter 8: Classes and Objects
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested