pdf viewer dll for c# : Adding image to pdf control SDK system web page wpf html console postgresql-9.4-A414-part2768

Chapter 5. Data Definition
name than their owner. In fact, the concepts of schema and user are nearly equivalent in a database
system that implements only the basic schema support specified in the standard. Therefore, many
users consider qualified names to really consist of
username
.
tablename
.This is how PostgreSQL
will effectively behave if you create a per-user schema for every user.
Also, there is no concept of a
public
schema in the SQL standard. For maximum conformance to
the standard, you should not use (perhaps even remove) the
public
schema.
Of course, some SQL database systems might not implement schemas at all, or provide namespace
supportby allowing (possibly limited) cross-database access. If youneedto work with those systems,
then maximum portabilitywould be achieved by not using schemas at all.
5.8. Inheritance
PostgreSQL implements table inheritance, which can be a useful tool for database designers.
(SQL:1999 and later define a type inheritance feature, which differs in many respects from the
features described here.)
Let’s startwith anexample:suppose we are tryingtobuilda data model for cities. Eachstatehas many
cities, but only one capital. We want to be able to quickly retrieve the capital city for any particular
state. This can be done by creating two tables, one for state capitals and one for cities that are not
capitals. However, what happens when we want to ask for data about a city, regardless of whether it
is a capital or not? The inheritance feature can help to resolve this problem. We define the
capitals
table so that it inherits from
cities
:
CREATE TABLE cities (
name
text,
population
float,
altitude
int
-- in feet
);
CREATE TABLE capitals (
state
char(2)
) INHERITS (cities);
In this case, the
capitals
table inherits all the columns of its parent table,
cities
.State capitals
also have an extra column,
state
,that shows their state.
In PostgreSQL, a table caninherit from zero or more other tables, and a querycan reference either all
rows of a table or all rows of a table plus all of its descendanttables. The latter behavior is the default.
For example, the following queryfinds the names of allcities, including state capitals, that are located
at an altitude over 500 feet:
SELECT name, altitude
FROM cities
WHERE altitude > 500;
Given the sample data from the PostgreSQL tutorial (see Section 2.1), this returns:
name
| altitude
-----------+----------
Las Vegas |
2174
Mariposa
|
1953
Madison
|
845
68
Adding image to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg to pdf document; add image pdf document
Adding image to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add an image to a pdf in reader; how to add a picture to a pdf document
Chapter 5. Data Definition
On the other hand, the following query finds all the cities that are not state capitals and are situated at
an altitude over 500 feet:
SELECT name, altitude
FROM ONLY cities
WHERE altitude > 500;
name
| altitude
-----------+----------
Las Vegas |
2174
Mariposa
|
1953
Here the
ONLY
keyword indicates that the query should apply only to
cities
,and not any tables
below
cities
in the inheritance hierarchy. Many of the commands that we have already discussed
SELECT
,
UPDATE
and
DELETE
—support the
ONLY
keyword.
You can also write the table name with a trailing
*
to explicitly specify that descendant tables are
included:
SELECT name, altitude
FROM cities
*
WHERE altitude > 500;
Writing
*
is not necessary, since this behavior is the default (unless you have changed the setting
of the sql_inheritance configuration option). However writing
*
might be useful to emphasize that
additional tables will be searched.
Insome cases you might wish toknowwhich table a particular roworiginated from. There is a system
column called
tableoid
in each table which can tell you the originating table:
SELECT c.tableoid, c.name, c.altitude
FROM cities c
WHERE c.altitude > 500;
which returns:
tableoid |
name
| altitude
----------+-----------+----------
139793 | Las Vegas |
2174
139793 | Mariposa
|
1953
139798 | Madison
|
845
(If you try to reproduce this example, you will probably get different numeric OIDs.) By doing a join
with
pg_class
you can see the actual table names:
SELECT p.relname, c.name, c.altitude
FROM cities c, pg_class p
WHERE c.altitude > 500 AND c.tableoid = p.oid;
which returns:
relname
|
name
| altitude
----------+-----------+----------
cities
| Las Vegas |
2174
cities
| Mariposa
|
1953
69
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB It's a demo code for adding image to word page using C#.
add picture pdf; add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add photo to pdf online; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
Chapter 5. Data Definition
capitals | Madison
|
845
Inheritance does not automatically propagate data from
INSERT
or
COPY
commands toother tables in
the inheritance hierarchy. In our example, the following
INSERT
statement will fail:
INSERT INTO cities (name, population, altitude, state)
VALUES (’New York’, NULL, NULL, ’NY’);
We might hope that the data would somehow be routed to the
capitals
table, but this does not
happen:
INSERT
always inserts into exactlythe table specified. In some cases itis possible to redirect
the insertionusinga rule (see Chapter 38). However thatdoes not help for the above case because the
cities
table does not contain the column
state
,and so the command will be rejected before the
rule can be applied.
All check constraints and not-null constraints on a parenttable are automatically inherited by its chil-
dren. Other types of constraints (unique, primary key, and foreign key constraints) are not inherited.
Atable can inherit from more than one parent table, in which case it has the union of the columns
defined by the parent tables. Any columns declared in the child table’s definition are added to these.
If the same column name appears in multiple parent tables, or in both a parent table and the child’s
definition, then these columns are “merged” so that there is only one such column in the child table.
To be merged, columns must have the same data types, else an error is raised. The merged column
will have copies of all the check constraints coming from any one of the column definitions it came
from, and will be marked not-null if any of them are.
Table inheritance is typically established when the child table is created, using the
INHERITS
clause
of the CREATE TABLE statement. Alternatively, a table which is already defined in a compatible
way can have a new parent relationship added, using the
INHERIT
variant of ALTER TABLE. To do
this the new childtable must already include columns with the same names and types as the columns
of the parent. It must also include check constraints with the same names and check expressions as
those of the parent. Similarlyan inheritance link can be removedfrom a child using the
NO INHERIT
variant of
ALTER TABLE
.Dynamically adding and removing inheritance links like this can be useful
whenthe inheritance relationship is being used for table partitioning (see Section 5.9).
One convenient way to create a compatible table that will later be made a new child is to use the
LIKE
clause in
CREATE TABLE
.This creates a new tablewith the same columns as the sourcetable. If
there are any
CHECK
constraints defined on the sourcetable, the
INCLUDING CONSTRAINTS
option to
LIKE
shouldbe specified, as the new childmust have constraints matching the parent tobe considered
compatible.
Aparent table cannot be dropped while any of its children remain. Neither can columns or check
constraints of child tables be dropped or altered if they are inherited from any parent tables. If you
wish to remove a table and all of its descendants, one easy way is to drop the parent table with the
CASCADE
option.
ALTER TABLE willpropagate anychanges incolumndata definitions andcheckconstraints downthe
inheritance hierarchy. Again, dropping columns that are depended on by other tables is only possible
whenusing the
CASCADE
option.
ALTER TABLE
follows the same rules for duplicate column merging
and rejection that apply during
CREATE TABLE
.
Note how table access permissions are handled. Querying a parent table can automaticallyaccess data
in child tables without further access privilege checking. This preserves the appearance that the data
is (also) inthe parent table. Accessingthe child tables directlyis, however, not automaticallyallowed
and would require further privileges to be granted.
70
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF document to/from supported document and image forms. to define text or images on PDF document and Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB
add photo to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
C# PowerPoint - Insert Image to PowerPoint File Page in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET convert image to PDF, C#.NET
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; add picture to pdf form
Chapter 5. Data Definition
5.8.1. Caveats
Note that not all SQL commands are able to work on inheritance hierarchies. Commands that are
used for data querying, data modification, or schema modification (e.g.,
SELECT
,
UPDATE
,
DELETE
,
most variants of
ALTER TABLE
,but not
INSERT
or
ALTER TABLE ... RENAME
)typically default
to includingchild tables and support the
ONLY
notation to exclude them. Commands that do database
maintenance and tuning (e.g.,
REINDEX
,
VACUUM
)typically only work on individual, physical tables
and do not support recursing over inheritance hierarchies. The respective behavior of each individual
command is documented in its reference page (Reference I, SQL Commands).
Aserious limitation of the inheritance feature is that indexes (including unique constraints) and for-
eign key constraints only apply to single tables, not to their inheritance children. This is true on both
the referencing and referenced sides of a foreign key constraint. Thus, in the terms of the above ex-
ample:
If we declared
cities
.
name
tobe
UNIQUE
or a
PRIMARY KEY
,this would not stop the
capitals
table from having rows with names duplicating rows in
cities
.And those duplicate rows would
by default show up in queries from
cities
.In fact, by default
capitals
would have no unique
constraint at all, and so could contain multiple rows with the same name. You could add a unique
constraint to
capitals
,but this would not prevent duplication compared to
cities
.
Similarly, if we were to specify that
cities
.
name REFERENCES
some other table, this constraint
wouldnotautomaticallypropagate to
capitals
.Inthis caseyoucouldworkaround it by manually
adding the same
REFERENCES
constraint to
capitals
.
Specifying that another table’s column
REFERENCES cities(name)
would allow the other table
to contain city names, but not capital names. There is no good workaround for this case.
These deficiencies will probably be fixed in some future release, but in the meantime considerable
care is needed in deciding whether inheritance is useful for your application.
5.9. Partitioning
PostgreSQL supports basic table partitioning. This section describes why and how to implement par-
titioning as part of your database design.
5.9.1. Overview
Partitioning refers to splitting what is logically one large table into smaller physical pieces. Partition-
ing can provide several benefits:
Query performance can be improved dramatically in certain situations, particularly when most of
the heavily accessed rows of the table are in a single partition or a small number of partitions. The
partitioning substitutes for leading columns of indexes, reducing index size and making it more
likely that the heavily-used parts of the indexes fit in memory.
When queries or updates access a large percentage of a single partition, performance can be im-
provedby taking advantage of sequentialscanof thatpartitioninsteadof using an index and random
access reads scattered across the whole table.
Bulk loads and deletes can be accomplished by adding or removing partitions, if that requirement
is plannedinto the partitioning design.
ALTER TABLE NO INHERIT
and
DROP TABLE
are bothfar
71
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; add picture to pdf preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
how to add image to pdf in acrobat; pdf insert image
Chapter 5. Data Definition
faster than a bulk operation. These commands also entirely avoid the
VACUUM
overhead caused by
abulk
DELETE
.
Seldom-used data can be migrated to cheaper and slower storage media.
The benefits willnormallybe worthwhile only when a table would otherwise be very large. The exact
point at which a table will benefit from partitioning depends on the application, although a rule of
thumb is that the size of the table shouldexceed the physical memory of the database server.
Currently, PostgreSQL supports partitioning via table inheritance. Each partition must be created as a
child table of a single parent table. The parent table itself is normally empty; itexists just torepresent
the entire data set. You should be familiar with inheritance (see Section 5.8) before attempting to set
up partitioning.
The following forms of partitioning can be implemented in PostgreSQL:
Range Partitioning
The tableis partitioned into“ranges” defined bya key column or setof columns, withno overlap
betweenthe ranges of values assigned todifferent partitions. For example one might partition by
date ranges, or by ranges of identifiers for particular business objects.
List Partitioning
The table is partitioned by explicitly listing which key values appear in each partition.
5.9.2. Implementing Partitioning
To set up a partitioned table, do the following:
1. Create the “master” table, from which all of the partitions will inherit.
This table will contain no data. Do not define any check constraints on this table, unless you
intend them to be applied equally to all partitions. There is no point in defining any indexes or
unique constraints on it, either.
2. Create several “child” tables that each inherit from the master table. Normally, these tables will
not add any columns to the set inherited from the master.
We will refer to the child tables as partitions, though they are in every way normal PostgreSQL
tables.
3. Add table constraints to the partition tables to define the allowed key values in each partition.
Typical examples would be:
CHECK ( x = 1 )
CHECK ( county IN ( ’Oxfordshire’, ’Buckinghamshire’, ’Warwickshire’ ))
CHECK ( outletID >= 100 AND outletID < 200 )
Ensure thatthe constraints guarantee thatthere is no overlap between the key values permitted in
different partitions. A common mistake is to set up range constraints like:
CHECK ( outletID BETWEEN 100 AND 200 )
CHECK ( outletID BETWEEN 200 AND 300 )
This is wrong since it is not clear which partition the keyvalue 200belongs in.
Note that there is no difference in syntax between range and list partitioning; those terms are
descriptive only.
72
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file programmer, you might need some other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using VB
add image to pdf reader; add photo to pdf preview
VB.NET TIFF: Add New Image to TIFF File in Visual Basic .NET
NET TIFF image processing SDK and its TIFF image adding function at this section, the following parts will describe the sample method for adding image to TIFF
add jpeg signature to pdf; how to add image to pdf document
Chapter 5. Data Definition
4. For each partition, create an index on the key column(s), as well as any other indexes you might
want. (The key index is not strictly necessary, but in most scenarios it is helpful. If you intend
the key values to be unique then youshould always create a unique or primary-key constraint for
each partition.)
5. Optionally, define a trigger or rule to redirectdatainsertedinto the master table tothe appropriate
partition.
6. Ensure that the constraint_exclusion configuration parameter is not disabled in
postgresql.conf
.If it is, queries will not be optimized as desired.
For example, suppose we are constructing a database for a large ice cream company. The company
measures peak temperatures every day as well as ice cream sales in each region. Conceptually, we
want a table like:
CREATE TABLE measurement (
city_id
int not null,
logdate
date not null,
peaktemp
int,
unitsales
int
);
We know that most queries will access just the last week’s, month’s or quarter’s data, since the main
use of this table will be to prepare online reports for management. To reduce the amount of old data
thatneeds to be stored, wedecide toonly keep the most recent 3 years worthof data. At the beginning
of each month we will remove the oldest month’s data.
In this situation we can use partitioning to help us meet all of our different requirements for the
measurements table. Following the steps outlined above, partitioning can be set upas follows:
1. The master table is the
measurement
table, declared exactly as above.
2. Next we create one partition for each active month:
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2006m02 ( ) INHERITS (measurement);
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2006m03 ( ) INHERITS (measurement);
...
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2007m11 ( ) INHERITS (measurement);
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2007m12 ( ) INHERITS (measurement);
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2008m01 ( ) INHERITS (measurement);
Each of the partitions are completetables in their ownright, but they inherittheir definitions from
the
measurement
table.
This solves one of our problems:deletingolddata. Eachmonth, all we willneed to dois perform
a
DROP TABLE
on the oldest child table and create a new child table for the new month’s data.
3. We must provide non-overlapping table constraints. Rather than just creating the partition tables
as above, the table creationscript should really be:
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2006m02 (
CHECK ( logdate >= DATE ’2006-02-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2006-03-01’ )
) INHERITS (measurement);
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2006m03 (
CHECK ( logdate >= DATE ’2006-03-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2006-04-01’ )
) INHERITS (measurement);
...
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2007m11 (
CHECK ( logdate >= DATE ’2007-11-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2007-12-01’ )
) INHERITS (measurement);
73
VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
TIFF document at the page level, like TIFF page adding & deleting to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
add photo to pdf file; add jpg to pdf form
Chapter 5. Data Definition
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2007m12 (
CHECK ( logdate >= DATE ’2007-12-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2008-01-01’ )
) INHERITS (measurement);
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2008m01 (
CHECK ( logdate >= DATE ’2008-01-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2008-02-01’ )
) INHERITS (measurement);
4. We probably need indexes on the key columns too:
CREATE INDEX measurement_y2006m02_logdate ON measurement_y2006m02 (logdate);
CREATE INDEX measurement_y2006m03_logdate ON measurement_y2006m03 (logdate);
...
CREATE INDEX measurement_y2007m11_logdate ON measurement_y2007m11 (logdate);
CREATE INDEX measurement_y2007m12_logdate ON measurement_y2007m12 (logdate);
CREATE INDEX measurement_y2008m01_logdate ON measurement_y2008m01 (logdate);
We choose not to add further indexes at this time.
5. We want our application to be able to say
INSERT INTO measurement ...
andhave the data
be redirected into the appropriate partition table. We can arrange that by attaching a suitable
trigger functionto the master table. If data will be added only to the latest partition, we can use a
very simple trigger function:
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION measurement_insert_trigger()
RETURNS TRIGGER AS $$
BEGIN
INSERT INTO measurement_y2008m01 VALUES (NEW.
*
);
RETURN NULL;
END;
$$
LANGUAGE plpgsql;
After creating the function, we create a trigger which calls the trigger function:
CREATE TRIGGER insert_measurement_trigger
BEFORE INSERT ON measurement
FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE measurement_insert_trigger();
We must redefine the trigger function each month so that it always points to the current partition.
The trigger definition does not need to be updated, however.
We might want to insertdata and have the server automatically locate the partition intowhich the
row should be added. We could do this with a more complex trigger function, for example:
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION measurement_insert_trigger()
RETURNS TRIGGER AS $$
BEGIN
IF ( NEW.logdate >= DATE ’2006-02-01’ AND
NEW.logdate < DATE ’2006-03-01’ ) THEN
INSERT INTO measurement_y2006m02 VALUES (NEW.
*
);
ELSIF ( NEW.logdate >= DATE ’2006-03-01’ AND
NEW.logdate < DATE ’2006-04-01’ ) THEN
INSERT INTO measurement_y2006m03 VALUES (NEW.
*
);
...
ELSIF ( NEW.logdate >= DATE ’2008-01-01’ AND
NEW.logdate < DATE ’2008-02-01’ ) THEN
INSERT INTO measurement_y2008m01 VALUES (NEW.
*
);
ELSE
RAISE EXCEPTION ’Date out of range.
Fix the measurement_insert_trigger() function!’;
END IF;
RETURN NULL;
END;
$$
LANGUAGE plpgsql;
74
Chapter 5. Data Definition
The trigger definition is the same as before. Note that each
IF
test must exactlymatch the
CHECK
constraint for its partition.
While this function is more complex than the single-month case, it doesn’t needto be updated as
often, since branches can be added in advance of being needed.
Note: In practice it might be best to check the newest partition first, if most inserts go into
that partition. For simplicity we have shown the trigger’s tests in the same order as in other
parts of this example.
As we can see, a complex partitioning scheme could require a substantial amount of DDL. In the
above example we would be creating a new partition each month, so it might be wise to write a script
that generates the required DDL automatically.
5.9.3. Managing Partitions
Normally the set of partitions established when initially defining the table are not intended to remain
static. It is common to want to remove old partitions of data and periodically add new partitions
for new data. One of the most important advantages of partitioning is precisely that it allows this
otherwise painful task to be executed nearly instantaneously by manipulating the partition structure,
rather than physically movinglarge amounts of data around.
The simplest option for removing old data is simply to drop the partition that is no longer necessary:
DROP TABLE measurement_y2006m02;
This can very quickly delete millions of records because it doesn’t have to individually delete every
record.
Another option that is often preferable is to remove the partition from the partitioned table but retain
access to it as a table in its own right:
ALTER TABLE measurement_y2006m02 NO INHERIT measurement;
This allows further operations to be performed on the data before it is dropped. For example, this is
often auseful time tobackupthe data using
COPY
,pg_dump, or similar tools. Itmightalso be a useful
time to aggregate data into smaller formats, perform other data manipulations, or run reports.
Similarly we can add a new partition to handle new data. We can create an empty partition in the
partitioned table just as the original partitions were created above:
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2008m02 (
CHECK ( logdate >= DATE ’2008-02-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2008-03-01’ )
) INHERITS (measurement);
As an alternative, it is sometimes more convenient to create the new table outside the partition struc-
ture, and make it a proper partition later. This allows the data to be loaded, checked, and transformed
prior to it appearing in the partitioned table:
CREATE TABLE measurement_y2008m02
(LIKE measurement INCLUDING DEFAULTS INCLUDING CONSTRAINTS);
ALTER TABLE measurement_y2008m02 ADD CONSTRAINT y2008m02
75
Chapter 5. Data Definition
CHECK ( logdate >= DATE ’2008-02-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2008-03-01’ );
\copy measurement_y2008m02 from ’measurement_y2008m02’
-- possibly some other data preparation work
ALTER TABLE measurement_y2008m02 INHERIT measurement;
5.9.4. Partitioning and Constraint Exclusion
Constraint exclusion is a query optimization technique that improves performance for partitioned
tables defined in the fashion described above. As an example:
SET constraint_exclusion = on;
SELECT count(
*
) FROM measurement WHERE logdate >= DATE ’2008-01-01’;
Without constraint exclusion, the above querywould scaneach of the partitions of the
measurement
table. With constraint exclusion enabled, the planner will examine the constraints of each partition
and try to prove that the partition need not be scanned because it could not contain any rows meeting
the query’s
WHERE
clause. When the planner can prove this, it excludes the partition from the query
plan.
You can use the
EXPLAIN
command to show the difference between a plan with
constraint_exclusion
on and a plan with it off. Atypical unoptimized plan for this type of table
setup is:
SET constraint_exclusion = off;
EXPLAIN SELECT count(
*
) FROM measurement WHERE logdate >= DATE ’2008-01-01’;
QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aggregate
(cost=158.66..158.68 rows=1 width=0)
->
Append
(cost=0.00..151.88 rows=2715 width=0)
->
Seq Scan on measurement
(cost=0.00..30.38 rows=543 width=0)
Filter: (logdate >= ’2008-01-01’::date)
->
Seq Scan on measurement_y2006m02 measurement
(cost=0.00..30.38 rows=543 width=0)
Filter: (logdate >= ’2008-01-01’::date)
->
Seq Scan on measurement_y2006m03 measurement
(cost=0.00..30.38 rows=543 width=0)
Filter: (logdate >= ’2008-01-01’::date)
...
->
Seq Scan on measurement_y2007m12 measurement
(cost=0.00..30.38 rows=543 width=0)
Filter: (logdate >= ’2008-01-01’::date)
->
Seq Scan on measurement_y2008m01 measurement
(cost=0.00..30.38 rows=543 width=0)
Filter: (logdate >= ’2008-01-01’::date)
Some or allof the partitions mightuse index scans insteadof full-table sequentialscans, butthe point
here is that there is no need to scan the older partitions at all to answer this query. When we enable
constraint exclusion, we get a significantly cheaper plan that will deliver the same answer:
SET constraint_exclusion = on;
EXPLAIN SELECT count(
*
) FROM measurement WHERE logdate >= DATE ’2008-01-01’;
QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aggregate
(cost=63.47..63.48 rows=1 width=0)
->
Append
(cost=0.00..60.75 rows=1086 width=0)
->
Seq Scan on measurement
(cost=0.00..30.38 rows=543 width=0)
Filter: (logdate >= ’2008-01-01’::date)
76
Chapter 5. Data Definition
->
Seq Scan on measurement_y2008m01 measurement
(cost=0.00..30.38 rows=543 width=0)
Filter: (logdate >= ’2008-01-01’::date)
Note that constraint exclusion is driven only by
CHECK
constraints, not by the presence of indexes.
Therefore it isn’t necessary to define indexes on the key columns. Whether an index needs to be
created for a given partition depends on whether you expect that queries that scan the partition will
generally scan a large part of the partition or just a small part. An index will be helpful in the latter
case but not the former.
The default (and recommended) setting of constraint_exclusion is actually neither
on
nor
off
,but an
intermediate setting called
partition
,whichcauses the technique to be applied only to queries that
are likely to be working on partitioned tables. The
on
setting causes the planner to examine
CHECK
constraints in all queries, even simple ones that are unlikely to benefit.
5.9.5. Alternative Partitioning Methods
Adifferentapproach toredirecting inserts into the appropriate partition table is toset uprules, instead
of a trigger, on the master table. For example:
CREATE RULE measurement_insert_y2006m02 AS
ON INSERT TO measurement WHERE
( logdate >= DATE ’2006-02-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2006-03-01’ )
DO INSTEAD
INSERT INTO measurement_y2006m02 VALUES (NEW.
*
);
...
CREATE RULE measurement_insert_y2008m01 AS
ON INSERT TO measurement WHERE
( logdate >= DATE ’2008-01-01’ AND logdate < DATE ’2008-02-01’ )
DO INSTEAD
INSERT INTO measurement_y2008m01 VALUES (NEW.
*
);
Arule has significantly more overhead than a trigger, but the overhead is paid once per query rather
than once per row, so this method might be advantageous for bulk-insert situations. In most cases,
however, the trigger method will offer better performance.
Be aware that
COPY
ignores rules. If you want touse
COPY
to insert data, you’ll need to copy into the
correct partition table rather than into the master.
COPY
does fire triggers, so you can use it normally
if you use the trigger approach.
Another disadvantage of the rule approach is that there is no simple way to force an error if the set of
rules doesn’t cover the insertion date; the data will silently go into the master table instead.
Partitioning can also be arrangedusinga
UNION ALL
view, instead of table inheritance. For example,
CREATE VIEW measurement AS
SELECT
*
FROM measurement_y2006m02
UNION ALL SELECT
*
FROM measurement_y2006m03
...
UNION ALL SELECT
*
FROM measurement_y2007m11
UNION ALL SELECT
*
FROM measurement_y2007m12
UNION ALL SELECT
*
FROM measurement_y2008m01;
However, the needto recreate the viewadds an extrastep toaddinganddroppingindividual partitions
of the data set. In practice this method has little to recommend it compared to using inheritance.
77
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested