how to add header and footer in pdf using c# : Extracting data from pdf into excel software control dll winforms azure .net web forms napee_chap6_418715_70-part1510

Extracting data from pdf into excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
pdf form save in reader; extract data from pdf form fields
Extracting data from pdf into excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data out of pdf file; flatten pdf form in reader
Programs  that  have  been  operating  over  the  past 
decade, and longer, have a history of proven savings in 
megawatts (MW), megawatt-hours (MWh), and therms, 
as well as on customer bills. These programs show that 
energy efficiency can compare very favorably to supply-
side options. 
This chapter summarizes key findings from a portfolio­
level
review of many of the energy efficiency programs 
that have been operating successfully for a number of 
years.  It  provides  an  overview of  best practices in  the 
following areas: 
• Political and human factors that have led to increased 
reliance on energy efficiency as a resource. 
• Key considerations used in identifying target measures
for 
energy efficiency programming in the near- and long-term. 
• Program design and delivery strategies that can maxi­
mize program impacts and increase cost-effectiveness. 
• The role of monitoring and evaluation in ensuring that 
program dollars are optimized and that energy efficiency 
investments deliver results. 
Background 
Best  practice  strategies  for  program  planning,  design 
and implementation, and evaluation were derived from 
a review of energy efficiency programs at the portfolio 
level across a range of policy models (e.g., public benefit 
charge  administration,  integrated  resource  planning). 
The box on page 6-3 describes the policy models and 
Table  6-1  provides  additional  details  and  examples  of 
programs operating  under  various  policy  models.  This 
chapter is not intended as a comprehensive review of the 
energy efficiency programs operating around the country, 
but does highlight key factors that can help improve and 
accelerate  energy  efficiency  program  success. 
Organizations reviewed for this effort have a sustained 
history of  successful energy efficiency  program  imple­
mentation  (See  Tables  6-2  and  6-3  for  summaries  of 
these programs) and share the following characteristics: 
• Significant investment in energy efficiency as a 
resource within their policy context. 
• Development of cost-effective programs that deliver 
results. 
• Incorporation of program design strategies that work 
to remove near- and long-term market barriers to invest­
ment in energy efficiency. 
• Willingness to devote the necessary resources to make 
programs successful. 
Most of the organizations reviewed also have conducted 
full-scale impact evaluations of their portfolio of energy 
efficiency investments within the last few years. 
The best practices gleaned from a review of these organ­
izations can assist utilities, their commissions, state energy 
offices, and other stakeholders in overcoming barriers to 
significant  energy  efficiency  programming,  and  begin 
tapping into energy efficiency as a valuable and clean 
resource to effectively meet future supply needs.  
1 For the purpose of this chapter, portfolio refers to the collective set of energy efficiency programs offered by a utility or third-party energy efficiency 
program administrator. 
Measures refer to the specific technologies (e.g., efficient lighting fixture) and practices (e.g., duct sealing) that are used to achieve energy savings. 
6-2
National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc. Help to extract single or multiple pages from adobe PDF file and save into a new PDF file.
how to save filled out pdf form in reader; export excel to pdf form
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
how to save pdf form data in reader; pdf data extraction tool
Energy Efficiency Programs Are Delivered Within Many Policy Models 
dels 
Systems Benefits Charge (SBC) Model 
In this model, funding for programs comes from an SBC 
that is either determined by legislation or a regulatory 
process.  The  charge  is  usually  a  fixed  amount  per 
kilowatt-hour  (kWh)  or  million  British  thermal  units 
(MMBtu) and is set for a number of years. Once funds 
are collected by the distribution or integrated utility, 
programs can be administered by the utility, a  state 
agency, or a third party. If the utility implements the 
programs, it usually receives current cost recovery and 
a shareholder  incentive.  Regardless of administrative 
structure,  there  is  usually an  opportunity  for  stake­
holder input. 
This model provides stable program design. In some 
cases,  funding  has  become  vulnerable  to  raids  by 
state agencies. In areas aggressively pursuing energy 
efficiency as a resource, limits to additional funding 
have created a ceiling on the resource. While predom­
inantly used in the electric sector, this model can, and 
is, being used to fund gas programs. 
Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) Model 
In this model, energy efficiency is part of the utility’s 
IRP. Energy efficiency, along with other demand-side 
options, is treated on an equivalent basis with supply. 
Cost recovery can either be in base rates or through a 
separate charge. The utility might receive a sharehold­
er incentive, recovery of lost revenue (from reduced 
sales volume), or both. Programs are driven more by 
the resource need than in the SBC models. This gen­
erally is an electric-only model. The regional planning 
model used by the Pacific Northwest is a variation on 
this model. 
Request For Proposal (RFP) Model 
In this case, a utility or an independent system opera­
tor  (ISO)  puts  out  a  competitive  solicitation  RFP  to 
acquire energy efficiency from a third-party provider 
to meet demand, particularly in areas where there are 
transmission and distribution bottlenecks or a gener­
ation need. Most examples of this model to date have 
been electric only. The focus of this type of program 
is typically on saving peak demand. 
Portfolio Standard 
In this model, the program adminstrator is subject to 
a portfolio standard expressed in terms of percentage 
of overall energy or demand.  This model can include 
gas as well as electric, and can be used independent­
ly or in conjunction with an SBC or IRP requirement. 
Municipal Utility/Electric Cooperative Model 
In this model, programs are administered by a munic­
ipal utility or electric cooperative. If the utility/cooper­
ative owns or is responsible for generation, the energy 
efficiency resource can be part of an IRP. Cost recovery 
is most likely in base rates. This model can include gas 
as well as electric. 
To create a sustainable, aggressive national commitment to energy efficiency 
6-3
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# programming sample for extracting all images from PDF. // Open a document. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page.
edit pdf form in reader; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text in PDF, extracting text from PDF, and value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
extracting data from pdf into excel; using pdf forms to collect data
Table 6-1. Overview of Energy Efficiency Programs 
ms 
Policy Model/ 
Examples 
Funding 
Type 
Shareholder 
Incentive
Lead 
Administrator 
Role in 
Resource 
Acquisition 
Scope of 
Programs 
Political 
Context 
SBC with utility 
implementation: 
California 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
Massachusetts 
Separate charge 
Usually 
Utility 
Depends on 
whether utility 
owns generation 
Programs for all 
customer classes 
Most programs of 
this type came out 
of a restructuring 
settlement in states 
where there was an 
existing infrastruc­
ture at the utilities 
SBC with state 
or third-party 
implementation: 
New York 
Vermont 
Wisconsin 
Separate charge 
No 
State agency 
Third party 
None or limited 
Programs for all 
customer classes 
Most programs of 
this type came out 
of a restructuring 
settlement 
IRP or gas 
planning model: 
Nevada 
Arizona 
Minnesota 
Bonneville Power 
Administration (BPA) 
(regional planning 
model as well) 
Vermont Gas 
Keyspan 
Varies: in rates, 
capitalized, or 
separate charge 
In some cases 
Utility 
Integrated 
Program type 
dictated by 
resource need 
Part of IRP 
requirement; 
may be combined 
with other models 
RFP model 
for full-scale 
programs and 
congestion relief 
Varies 
No 
Utility buys from 
third party 
Integrated – can 
be T&D only 
Program type 
dictated by 
resource need 
Connecticut and 
Con Edison going 
out to bid to reduce 
congestion 
Portfolio standard 
model (can be 
combined with 
SBC or IRP): 
Nevada 
California 
Connecticut 
Texas 
Varies 
Varies 
Utility may 
implement 
programs or 
buy to meet 
standard 
Standard portfolio 
Programs for all 
customer classes 
Generally used 
in states with 
existing programs 
to increase program 
activity 
Municipal 
utility & electric 
cooperative: 
Sacramento 
Municipal Utility 
District (CA) 
City of Austin (TX) 
Great River Energy 
(MN) 
In rates 
No 
Utility 
Depends on 
whether utility 
owns generation 
Programs for all 
customer classes 
Based on customer 
and resource needs; 
can be similar to IRP 
model 
A shareholder incentive is a financial incentive to a utility (above those that would normally be recovered in a rate case) for achieving set goals for 
or 
energy efficiency program performance. 
6-4
National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form. OCR text from scanned PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK.
pdf data extractor; extract data from pdf to excel
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Sample for extracting all images from PDF in VB.NET program. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
extract data from pdf to excel online; export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet
Key Findings 
Overviews of  the energy efficiency programs  reviewed 
for this chapter are provided in Table 6-2 and 6-3. Key 
findings drawn from these programs include: 
• Energy efficiency resources are being acquired on aver­
age  at  about  one-half  the  cost  of  the  typical  new 
power sources, and about one-third of the cost of nat­
ural gas supply in many cases—and contribute to an 
overall lower cost energy system for rate-payers (EIA, 
2006). 
• Many energy efficiency programs are being delivered at 
a total program cost of about $0.02 to $0.03 per life­
time kilowatt-hour  (kWh)  saved  and  $0.30 to $2.00 
per  lifetime  million  British  thermal  units  (MMBtu) 
saved. These costs are less than the avoided costs seen 
in most regions of the country. Funding for the majority 
of programs reviewed ranges from about 1 to 3 per­
cent of electric utility revenue and 0.5 to 1 percent of 
gas utility revenue. 
• Even low energy cost states, such as those in the Pacific 
Northwest, have reason to invest in energy efficiency, 
as  energy  efficiency  provides  a  low-cost,  reliable 
resource that reduces customer utility bills. Energy effi­
ciency also  costs less  than constructing new genera­
tion, and provides a hedge against market, fuel, and 
environmental risks (Northwest Power and Conservation 
Council, 2005). 
• Well-designed programs provide opportunities for cus­
tomers of all types to adopt energy savings measures 
and reduce their energy bills. These programs can help 
customers make sound energy use decisions, increase 
control over their energy bills, and empower them to 
manage their energy usage. Customers can experience 
significant savings depending on their own habits and 
the program offered. 
• Consistently funded, well-designed efficiency programs 
are cutting electricity and natural gas load—providing 
annual savings for a given program year of 0.15 to 1 
percent  of  energy  sales.  These  savings  typically  will 
accrue at this level for 10 to 15 years. These programs 
are  helping  to  offset  20  to  50  percent  of  expected 
energy growth in some regions without compromising 
end-user activity or economic well being. 
• Research and development enables a continuing source 
of new technologies and methods for improving energy 
efficiency  and  helping  customers  control  their 
energy bills. 
• Many state and regional studies have found that pur­
suing  economically  attractive,  but  as  yet  untapped 
energy efficiency could yield more than 20 percent sav­
ings  in total electricity demand  nationwide  by 2025. 
These savings could help cut load growth by half  or 
more, compared to current forecasts. Savings in direct 
use of natural gas could similarly provide a 50 percent 
or greater reduction in  natural gas demand  growth. 
Potential  varies  by  customer  segment,  but  there  are 
cost-effective opportunities for all customer classes. 
• Energy efficiency programs are being operated success­
fully  across  many  different  contexts:  regulated  and 
unregulated  markets;  utility,  state,  or  third-party 
administration; investor-owned,  public,  and coopera­
tives; and gas and electric utilities. 
• Energy efficiency resources are being acquired through 
 variety  of  mechanisms  including  system  benefits 
charges  (SBCs),  energy  efficiency  portfolio  standards 
(EEPSs),  and  resource  planning  (or  cost  of  service) 
efforts. 
• Cost-effective energy efficiency programs for electricity 
and natural gas can be specifically targeted to reduce 
peak load. 
• Effective models are available for delivering gas and 
electric energy efficiency programs to all customer classes. 
Models may vary based on whether a utility is in the ini­
tial  stages  of  energy  efficiency programming,  or  has 
been implementing  programs for a number  of years. 
To create a sustainable, aggressive national commitment to energy efficiency 
6-5
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are to load a PDF document from file or query data and save the PDF document.
extract data from pdf; extract pdf data to excel
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are to load a PDF document from file or query data and save the PDF document.
how to make pdf editable form reader; save data in pdf form reader
Table 6-2. Efficiency Measures of Natural Gas Savings Programs 
ams 
Program Administrator 
Keyspan 
(MA) 
Vermont Gas 
(VT) 
SoCal Gas 
(CA) 
Policy Model 
Gas 
Gas 
Gas 
Period 
2004 
2004 
2004 
Program Funding 
Average Annual Budget ($MM) 
12 
1.1 
21 
% of Gas Revenue 
1.00% 
1.60% 
0.53% 
Benefits 
Annual MMBtu Saved (000s MMBtu) 
500 
60 
1,200 
Lifetime MMBtu Saved  (000s MMBtu) 
6,000 
700 
15,200 
Cost-Effectiveness 
Cost of Energy Efficiency ($/lifetime MMBtu) 
Retail Gas Prices ($/thousand cubic feet [Mcf]) 
11 
Cost of Energy Efficiency (% Avoided Energy Cost) 
19% 
18% 
18% 
Total Avoided Cost (2005 $/MMBtu) 
12 
11 
SWEEP, 2006; Southern California Gas Company, 2004. 
4. 
Lifetime MMBtu calculated as 12 times annual MMBtu saved where not reported (not reported for Keyspan or Vermont Gas). 
). 
VT and MA avoided cost (therms) represents all residential (not wholesale) cost considerations (ICF Consulting, 2005). 
• Energy efficiency programs, projects, and policies ben­
efit  from  established  and  stable  regulations,  clear 
goals, and comprehensive evaluation. 
• Energy efficiency programs benefit from committed 
program  administrators  and  oversight  authorities,  as 
well as strong stakeholder support. 
• Most large-scale programs have improved productivity, 
enabling job growth in the commercial and industrial sectors. 
• Large-scale energy efficiency programs can reduce 
wholesale market prices. 
Lessons  learned  from  the  energy  efficiency  programs 
operated since inception of utility programs in the late 
1980s are presented as follows, and cover key aspects of 
energy efficiency program planning, design, implemen­
tation, and evaluation. 
Summary of Best Practices 
In this chapter, best practice strategies are organized and 
explained under four major groupings: 
• Making Energy Efficiency a Resource 
• Developing an Energy Efficiency Plan 
• Designing and Delivering Energy Efficiency Programs 
• Ensuring Energy Efficiency Investments Deliver Results 
For the most part, the best practices are independent of 
the policy model in which the programs operate. Where 
policy context is important, it is discussed in relevant sec­
tions of this chapter. 
6-6
National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency 
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
functions to PDF document imaging application, such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text in PDF, extracting text from PDF, and so on
extracting data from pdf forms to excel; how to flatten a pdf form in reader
Making Energy Efficiency a Resource 
Energy efficiency is a resource that can be acquired to 
help utilities meet current and future energy demand. To 
realize this potential requires leadership at multiple levels, 
organizational alignment, and an understanding of the 
nature and extent of the energy efficiency resource. 
• Leadership at multiple levels is needed to establish the 
business case for energy efficiency, educate key stake­
holders, and enact policy changes that increase invest­
ment  in  energy  efficiency  as  a  resource.  Sustained 
leadership is needed from: 
— Key individuals in upper management at the utility 
who understand that energy efficiency is a resource 
alternative that can help manage risk, minimize long-
term costs, and satisfy customers. 
— State agencies, regulatory commissions, local govern­
ments and associated legislative bodies, and/or consumer 
advocates that expect to see energy efficiency considered 
as part of comprehensive utility management. 
— Businesses that value energy efficiency as a way to 
improve  operations,  manage  energy  costs,  and  con­
tribute to long-term energy price stability and availabili­
ty, as well as trade associations and businesses, such as 
Energy Service Companies (ESCOs), that help members 
and customers achieve improved energy performance. 
— Public interest groups that understand that in order 
to  achieve  energy  efficiency  and  environmental 
objectives, they must help educate key stakeholders 
and find workable solutions to some of the financial 
challenges  that  limit  acceptance  and  investment  in 
energy efficiency by utilities.
• Organizational alignment. With policies in place to sup­
port energy efficiency programming, organizations need 
to institutionalize policies to ensure that energy efficiency 
goals are realized. Factors contributing to success include: 
— Strong support from upper management and one or 
more internal champions. 
— A framework appropriate to the organization that 
supports large-scale implementation of energy effi­
ciency programs. 
— Clear, well-communicated program goals that are tied 
to organizational goals and possibly compensation. 
— Adequate staff resources to get the job done. 
— A commitment to continually improve business 
processes. 
• Understanding of the efficiency resource is necessary 
to create a credible business case for energy efficiency. 
Best practices include the following: 
— Conduct a “potential study” prior to starting programs 
to inform and shape program and portfolio design. 
— Outline what can be accomplished at what costs. 
— Review measures for all customer classes including 
those appropriate for hard-to-reach customers, such 
as low income and very small business customers. 
Developing an Energy Efficiency Plan 
An energy efficiency plan should reflect a long-term per­
spective  that  accounts  for  customer  needs,  program 
cost-effectiveness,  the  interaction  of  programs  with 
other policies that increase energy efficiency, the oppor­
tunities  for  new  technology,  and  the  importance  of 
addressing multiple  system  needs  including  peak load 
reduction and congestion  relief. Best  practices include 
the following: 
• Offer programs for all key customer classes. 
• Align goals with funding. 
3 Public interest groups include environmental organizations such as the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Alliance to Save Energy (ASE), and 
American Council for an Energy  Efficient Economy (ACEEE) and regional market transformation entities such as the Northeast Energy  Efficiency 
Partnerships (NEEP), Southwest Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP), and Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA). 
To create a sustainable, aggressive national commitment to energy efficiency 
6-7
Table 6-3. Efficiency Measures of Electric and Combination Programs 
ams 
NYSERDA 
(NY) 
Efficiency 
Vermont 
(VT) 
MA Utilities 
(MA) 
WI Department 
of 
Administration12 
CA Utilities 
(CA) 
Policy Model 
SBC w/State Admin 
SBC w/3rd Party Admin 
SBC w/Utility Admin 
SBC w/State Admin 
SBC w/Utility Admin 
& Portfolio Standard 
Period 
2005 
2004 
2002 
2005 
2004 
Program Funding 
Spending on Electric Energy 
Efficiency ($MM) 
138 
14 
123 
63 
317 
Budget as % of Electric Revenue 
1.3% 
3.3% 
3.0% 
1.4% 
1.5% 
Avg Annual Budget Gas ($MM) 
NR 10 
NA 
11 
NA 
NA 
% of Gas Revenue 
NR 10 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
Benefits 
Annual MWh Saved / MWh Sales 3,4 
0.2% 
0.9% 
0.4% 
0.1% 
1.0% 
Lifetime MWh Saved (000s MWh) 
6,216 
700 
3,428 
1,170 
22,130 
Annual MW Reduction 
172 
15 
48 
81 
377 
Lifetime MMBtu Saved (000s MMBtu) 
17,124 
470 
850 
11,130 
43,410 
Annual MMBtu Saved (000s MMBtu) 
1,427 
40 
70 
930 
3,620 
Non-Energy Benefits 
$79M bill 
reduction 
37,200 CCF of water 
$21M bill 
reduction 
2,090 new jobs 
created 
Value of 
non-energy benefits: 
Residential: $6M 
C/I: $36M 
NR 
Avoided Emissions (tons/yr for 1 
program year) 
(could include benefits from load response, 
renewable, and DG programs) 
NO
X
: 470 
SO
2
: 850 
CO
2
: 400,000 
Unspecified pollutants: 
460,000 over 
lifetime 
NO
X
: 135 
SO
2
: 395 
CO
2
: 161,205 
NO
X
: 2,167 
SO
2
: 4,270 
CO
2
: 977,836 
(annual savings from 5
program years) 
NR 
Cost-Effectiveness 
Cost of Energy Efficiency 
$/lifetime (kWh) 
0.02 
0.02 
0.03 
0.05 
0.01 
$/lifetime (MMBtu) 
NA 
NA 
0.32 
NA 
NA 
Retail Electricity Prices ($/kWh) 
0.13 
0.11 
0.11 
0.07 
0.13 
Retail Gas Prices ($/mcf) 
NA 
NA 
NR 
NA 
NA 
Avoided Costs (2005$) 7,8 
Energy  ($/kWh) 
0.03 
0.07 
0.07 
0.02 to 0.06 13 
0.06 
Capacity  ($/kW)
28.20 
3.62 
6.64 
On-Peak Energy ($/kWh) 
0.08 
Off-Peak Energy ($/kWh) 
0.06 
Cost of Energy Efficiency as % Avoided 
Energy Cost 
89% 
29% 
10% 
90% 
23% 
C/I = Commercial and Industrial; CO
= Carbon Dioxide; $MM = Million Dollars; N/A = Not Applicable; NR = Not Reported; NO
= Nitrogen Oxides; 
SO
= Sulfur Dioxide 
NYSERDA 2005 spending derived from subtracting cumulative 2004 spending from cumulative 2005 spending; includes demand response and 
and 
research and development (R&D). 
ACEEE, 2004; Seattle City Light, 2005. 
Annual MWh Saved averaged over program periods for Wisconsin and California Utilities. NYSERDA 2005 energy efficiency savings derived from 
rom 
subtracting cumulative 2004 savings from 2005 cumulative reported savings. 
EIA, 2006; Austin Energy, 2004; Seattle City Light, 2005. Total sales for California Utilities in 2003 and SMUD in 2004 were derived based on 
d on 
growth in total California retail sales as reported by EIA. 
Lifetime MWh savings based on 12 years effective life of installed equipment where not reported for NYSERDA, Wisconsin, Nevada, SMUD, BPA, 
A, 
and Minnesota. Lifetime MMBtu savings based on 12 years effective life of installed equipment. 
6-8
National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency 
Table 6-3. 
Efficiency Measures of Electric and Combination Programs (continued) 
d) 
Nevada 
CT Utilities 
(CT) 
SMUD 
(CA) 
Seattle City 
Light (WA) 
Austin Energy 
Bonneville Power 
Administration  
(ID, MT, OR, WA) 
A) 
MN Electric and 
Gas Investor-Owned 
Utilities (MN) 
IRP with 
Portfolio 
Standard 
SBC w/Utility Admin 
& Portfolio Standard 
Municipal 
Utility 
Municipal Utility 
Municipal Utility 
Regional Planning 
IRP and Conservation 
Improvement Program 
2003 
2005 
2004 
2004 
2005 
2004 
2003 
Program Funding 
11 
65 
30 
20 
25 
78 
52 
0.5% 
3.1% 
1.5% 
3.4% 
1.9% 
NR 
NR 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
$14 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
0.50% 
Benefits 
0.1% 
1.0% 
0.5% 
0.7% 
0.9% 
0.5% 
420 
4,400 
630 
1,000 
930 
3,080 
3,940 
16 
135 
14 
50 
47.2 
129 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
10,777 
NA 
22,010 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
1,268 
NA 
1,830 
NR 
lifetime savings of 
$550M on bills 
NR 
lifetime savings of 
$430M on bills 
created 
Potentially over 900 
jobs created 
Residential: $6M 
C/I: $36M 
NR 
NR 
NR 
NO
X
: 334 
SO
2
: 123 
CO
2
: 198,586 
NO
X
:18 
CO
2
: 353,100 
(cummulative 
annual savings for 
13 years) 
NO
X
: 640 
SO
2
: 104 
CO
2
: 680,000 
over lifetime 
NR 
NR 
Cost-Effectiveness 
0.03 
0.01 
0.03 
0.02 
0.03 
0.03 
0.01 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
2.32 
NA 
0.06 
0.09 
0.10 
0.10 
0.06 
0.12 
Wholesaler - NA 
0.06 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
NA 
5.80 
0.07 
NR 
NR 
Wholesaler - NA 
NR 
36.06 
20.33 
0.08 
0.06 
Not calculated 
21% 
63% 
Not calculated 
Not calculated 
Not calculated 
Calculated for all cases except SMUD; SMUD data provided by J. Parks, Manager, Energy Efficiency and Customer R&D, Sacramento Municipal 
al 
Utility District (personal communication, May 19, 2006). 
Avoided cost reported as a consumption ($/kWh) not a demand (kW) figure. 
Total NSTAR avoided cost for 2006. 
Avoided capacity reported by NYSERDA as the three-year averaged hourly wholesale bid price per MWh. 
h. 
10 NYSERDA does not separately track gas-related project budget, revenue, or benefits. 
11 NSTAR Gas only
12 Wisconsin has a portfolio that includes renewable distributed generation; some comparisons might not be appropriate. 
ate. 
13 Range based on credits given for renewable distributed generation. 
To create a sustainable, aggressive national commitment to energy efficiency 
6-9
• Use cost-effectiveness tests that are consistent with 
long-term planning. 
• Consider building codes and appliance standards when 
designing programs. 
• Plan to incorporate new technologies. 
• Consider efficiency investments to alleviate transmis­
sion and distribution constraints. 
• Create a roadmap of key program components, 
milestones, and explicit energy use reduction goals. 
Designing and Delivering Energy Efficiency Programs 
Program administrators can reduce the time to market 
and implement programs and increase cost-effectiveness 
by leveraging the wealth of knowledge and experience 
gained by other program administrators throughout the 
nation and working with industry to deliver energy effi­
ciency to market. Best practices include the following: 
• Begin with the market in mind. 
— Conduct a market assessment. 
— Solicit stakeholder input. 
— Listen to customer and trade ally needs. 
— Use utility channels and brands. 
— Promote both energy and non-energy (e.g., 
improved comfort, improved air quality) benefits of 
energy efficient products and practices to customers. 
— Coordinate with other utilities and third-party pro­
gram administrators. 
— Leverage the national ENERGY STAR program. 
— Keep participation simple. 
— Keep funding (and other program characteristics) as 
consistent as possible. 
— Invest in education, training, and outreach. 
— Leverage customer contact to sell additional efficien­
cy and conservation. 
• Leverage  private  sector  expertise,  external  funding, 
and financing. 
— Leverage manufacturer and retailer resources 
through cooperative promotions. 
— Leverage state and federal tax credits and other tax 
incentives (e.g., accelerated  depreciation,  first-year 
expensing, sales tax holidays) where available. 
— Build on ESCO and other financing program options. 
— Consider outsourcing some programs to private and 
not-for-profit  organizations  that  specialize  in 
program  design  and  implementation  through  a 
competitive bidding process. 
• Start  with  demonstrated  program  models—build 
infrastructure for the future. 
— Start with successful program approaches from 
other utilities and program administrators and adapt 
them  to  local  conditions  to  accelerate  program 
design and effective implementation. 
— Determine the right incentives, and if incentives are finan­
cial, make sure that they are set at appropriate levels. 
— Invest in educating and training the service industry 
(e.g., home performance contractors, heating and cool­
ing  technicians)  to  deliver  increasingly  sophisticated 
energy efficiency services. 
— Evolve to more comprehensive programs. 
6-10
National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested