convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : How to save a pdf form in reader Library SDK class asp.net wpf .net ajax Hag123-part740

Optimal Romanian clitics
31
possible by the theory (no information is available on negative imperatives).
This rare case also reveals that, universally, finite imperative morphology is
less  marked  than  non-finite  morphology  (regardless  of  whether  finite
morphology is specific to imperatives or not). This suggests two OT avenues.
One, the input to imperatives contains both features [imp] and [T]. Two, non-
finite imperative morphology follows whenever the feature [T] is not parsed.
That is to  say, non-finite candidates violate  an  Input-Output faithfulness
constraint called P
ARSE
(T).
(36) 
P
ARSE
(T): The input feature [T] must be parsed in the output.
One  final  aspect  of  the  morphology  needs  consideration. Finite
imperative morphology, at least in most Romance and Balkan languages, is
realized as verbal inflection rather than some sort of particle (as is the case in
some other languages). This means that a single form instantiates two features,
[imp]  and  [T].  As  expected,  such  forms  are  constrained  both  by
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
) and E
DGEMOST
(T). Following a suggestion made by Paul
Smolensky (personal communication), I propose that such forms are also
constrained by the conjunction of E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&
E
DGEMOST
(T) which
outranks  the simpler  constraints.  Such conjunctions  have been argued to
operate  both  in  phonology  (Smolensky  1993,  1995,  1997)  and  syntax
(Legendre  et  al, 1998;  Legendre,  in  press  a).  They  are  known  as  local
conjunctions in the literature because the conjoined constraint is violated only
when the conjuncts are both violated within a common local domain. Further
discussion of local conjunctions follows the presentation of the candidate set
in T11 which concerns positive imperatives in Romanian. 
Recall that that the forms las
|
and l
|
sa are finite and non-finite,
respectively. This has important consequences for the applicability of certain
constraints to a given candidate. Non-finite candidates are annotated with -T
in the next few tableaux.
T11. Romanian positive imperatives
I: [imp] [T] [acc]
*S
TRUC
*t E(
IMP
)
&E(T)
P
ARSE
(T) E(
ACC
) E(
IMP
) E(T) NI
N
(T)
L a. [
V!
las| m
|
]
Ç
Ç
a’. [
V’
l|sa  m
|
]  -T
*!
*
How to save a pdf form in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract pdf form data to xml; export pdf form data to excel
How to save a pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
html form output to pdf; extracting data from pdf files
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
32
14 Note that the Romanian plural imperative is finite in both positive and negative
contexts; hence reference to number features must ultimately be incorporated to the present
account.
b. [
V!
m
|
las|]   
*!
*
*
b’. [
V’
m
|
l|sa ]  -T
*!
*
*
c. [
V!
las| [
V’
m
|
t ]]
*!
*
*
*
c’.[
V’
l|sa [
V’
m
|
t ]] -T *!
*
*
*
The candidate set includes verb movement candidates c and c’. Given the
relative ranking of the relevant constraints -- *S
TRUCTURE
, *t >> E
DGEMOST
constraints as shown in section 3 --  candidates c and c’ are immediately
disqualified. We know that the optimal candidate a violates E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
and N
ON
I
NITIAL
(T). The question is: why aren’t a’, b, or c’ optimal instead?
They violate constraints that are lower ranked than E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
). The
answer must be that additional constraints are at work. One is P
ARSE
(T).
Ranking
P
ARSE
(T)  higher  than  the  highest-ranked  constraint  violated  by
optimal a says that it is preferable in Romanian to have encliticization in
imperatives  (and  violate  E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
))  than  switch  to  non-finite
morphology (and violate P
ARSE
(T)). This partial ranking eliminates two non-
finite candidates a’ and b’. This leaves candidate b which does not violate
P
ARSE
(T) and yet is non-optimal. This is where local conjunction comes in.
Note that candidate b violates both E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
) and
E
DGEMOST
(T). It is
conceivable  that  there  is  a  stronger  requirement  on  a  morpheme  which
instantiates more than one feature, formally characterizable as the conjunction
of  E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)  and  E
DGEMOST
(T).  From  the  competition  between
candidates  a and b  we can derive one relative ordering of the conjoined
constraint:  E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
).  One
important restriction on conjoined constraints is their local domain. It is not the
case than any two constraints can be conjoined. Only constraints relevant to a
single local domain can be.
14
My claim, then, is that portmanteau morphemes
are the locus of such constraint interaction. It is a welcome possibility, I
believe, for synthetic morphology has, to the best of my knowledge, never
received any formal consideration by syntacticians incorporating inflectional
morphology to syntax.
Of course,  the theory  predicts several  types  of  re-rankings. Two
important ones are considered here. The reverse order, clitic-verb, is predicted
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
SaveFile(String filePath): Save PDF document file to a specified path form (Here, we take a blank form as an open a file dialog and load your PDF document in
pdf form save in reader; pdf form field recognition
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
put image into specified PDF page position and save existing PDF image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field.
extract data from pdf form to excel; how to fill pdf form in reader
Optimal Romanian clitics
33
if  the  conjoined  constraint  is  demoted  below  E
DGEMOST
(
DAT
),
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
).
Under this re-ranking, candidate b is the optimal one in T11.
Several  cases  of  procliticization  in  positive  imperatives  are  in  fact
acknowledged in Rooryck (1992). Note that two of the languages belong to the
Balkan group (Tsakonian is a Modern Greek dialect).
(37)
a. Brazilian Portuguese
Me da!
‘Give me’
b. Tsakonian
Mou pe!   
‘Tell me’
c. Albanian
Më thuaj! 
‘Tell me’
Another  re-ranking  prediction  is  made  by  re-ranking  P
ARSE
(T)  below
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) or
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
). It yields procliticization with non-finite
verbal morphology; that is, candidate b’ becomes optimal.  It remains to be
seen whether Yokuts instantiates this ranking. 
Under the present analysis, positive imperatives in Romanian are finite
because, among other things, they satisfy P
ARSE
(T). However, P
ARSE
(T) is
violated in Romanian negative imperatives. Can we also derive the preverbal
position of clitics in negative imperatives from the ranking in T11? The answer
is yes, as shown in T12.
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word is used to illustrate how to save a sample RE__Test Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub New
extract table data from pdf; how to save fillable pdf form in reader
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
how to flatten a pdf form in reader; extract data from pdf using java
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
34
T12.
Romanian negative imperatives
I: [neg] [imp] [T]
[acc]
E(
NEG
)
E(
IMP
)&
E(T)
P
ARSE
(T) E(
ACC
) E(
IMP
) E(T)
La. [
V!
nu m
|
l|sa]   -
T
Ç
Ç
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
a’. [
V’
nu m
|
las| ]
**!
*
**
**
b.  [
V!
nu l|sa  m
|
]   -
T
*
**!
*
b’. [V’ nu las| m
|
]
*!
**
*
*
c.  [
V!
l|sa  nu m
|
]   -T *!
*
**
c'.  [
V!
las| nu m
|
]  
*!
**
Consider how this result is achieved. Assume that the alignment constraint on
the feature [neg] outranks all other E
DGEMOST
constraints (nu precedes all
other clitics discussed here). The fact that candidate c is sub-optimal shows that
E
DGEMOST
(
NEG
)  outranks  P
ARSE
(T),  violated  by  optimal  candidate  a.
Whenever  E
DGEMOST
(
NEG
)  is  satisfied,  all  other  competing  E
DGEMOST
constraints  are  violated.  In  particular,  finite  candidates  violate
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T)
while non-finite candidates vacuously satisfy
the conjoined constraint. Under the ranking E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T)
>>
P
ARSE
(T), all finite candidates are eliminated from the competition. This
leaves the non-finite ones, a and b, which differ with respect to the next lower-
ranked constraint, E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
). Because of gradiency, only candidate a
survives this step in the optimization process. Hence, candidate a is optimal. 
The remainder of this section is devoted to imperatives in languages
like Italian which share the morphological properties of Romanian but differ
in  the  placement  of clitics  in negative  imperatives. I  am assuming  with
Zanuttini (1997) that non is a head, and that P
ARSE
(
NEG
S
COPE
) is undominated.
T13 shows that minimal re-ranking predicts the Italian pattern. The forms leggi
and legger(e) are finite and non-finite, respectively.
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Turn PDF form data to HTML form. makes it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a multi-page PDF document and save each PDF page as
how to make pdf editable form reader; can reader edit pdf forms
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
Eaisly save and print designed PDF document using C# code; PDF document viewer can be created in C# Web Forms, Windows Form and mobile applications.
extract data from pdf table; how to type into a pdf form in reader
Optimal Romanian clitics
35
T13.
Italian negative imperatives
I: [imp] [T] [acc]
E(
IMP
)
&E(T)
P
ARSE
(T)
E(
IMP
)
E(
ACC
)
E(T)
a. [
V!
non [lo leggere]]  -T
*
**!
*
a ’.[
V’
non [lo leggi]]   
**!
**
*
**
b. [
V!
non lo [leggere]]  -T
*
**!
*
b’.[
V’
non lo [leggi]]
**!
**
*
**
L c. [
V!
non [leggerlo]]  -
T
Ç
Ç
ÇÇ
c’. [
V’
non [leggilo]]
*!
*
**
*
Recall that in Romanian, candidate a wins in T12: it violates E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)
twice but higher-ranked E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) only once; its closest competitor b
violates E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) twice. In Italian (T13), the optimal candidate is c.
Unlike its closest competitors, a and b, c violates
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
) only once
versus twice for a and b. On the other hand, c violates E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
) twice
which is violated only once by a and b. Compared to Romanian, the Italian
pattern  follows  simply  from  the  re-ranking  of  E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)  and
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
).  In  Romanian,
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
).  In
Italian, it is the reverse: E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
). 
Consider the prediction that the ranking in T13 makes for Italian
positive imperatives. In the absence of non,
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T)
can be satisfied.
P
ARSE
(T) can also be satisfied by candidates which satisfy the
conjoined
E
DGEMOST
constraint. The competition trickles down to the very
ranking  established  on the  basis  of  T13,  i.e. E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
) outranking
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
).  The  optimal  candidate  must  be  the  one  which  satisfy
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
), that is a structure in which the accusative clitic follows the
verb.  This  is  indeed  the  correct  prediction,  as  shown  in  (37a).  The
corresponding tableau is given in T14.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
fill in pdf form reader; extract data from pdf c#
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
to extract single or multiple pages from adobe PDF file and save into a The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a widely-used form of file
pdf data extractor; extract table data from pdf to excel
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
36
T14. Italian positive imperatives
I: [imp] [T] [acc]
*S
TRUC
*t E(
IMP
)
&E(T)
P
ARSE
(T) E(
IMP
) E(
ACC
) E(T) *I
N
(T)
L a.  [
V!
leggilo]
Ç
Ç
a’. [
V’
leggerlo]  -T
*!
*
b.  [
V!
lo leggi]
*!
*
*
b’. [
V’
lo leggere] -T
*!
*
*
c. [
V!
leggi [
V’
lo  t]] *!
*
*
To summarize the main points of section 4, I have proposed that the
Romanian order verb-clitic in positive imperatives is regulated by a conjoined
constraint, E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T), which outranks the constraints it
is a conjunction of, as well as E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
). The only way the conjoined
constraint  can be  satisfied is by  having  clitic  pronouns  follow  the  verb.
Wherever the conjoined constraint is inapplicable, the ranking E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(T)  forces  the  decision  and  yields  procliticization  (i.e.,  in
declaratives  and  questions).  In  negative  imperatives,
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T) can never be satisfied due to the presence of
the negative particle. The solution is to be unfaithful to the input and violate
P
ARSE
(T).  The  best  candidate  becomes  the  one  which  best  satisfies
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
), namely procliticization. Thus, finite and
non-finite candidate structures compete for optimization in all imperatives.
Finally, I have illustrated minimal re-ranking effects in Italian.
Dobrovie-Sorin (1994, 1995) offers an alternative analysis in which
comparatively few functional projections are also posited. Her analysis is
specifically designed to address the topic of the present paper. Yet, it differs
from the present analysis in some significant ways. For one, she analyzes both
questions  and  imperatives  in  terms  of  verb  movement  which  has  the
consequence of generating traces which are subject to the inviolable ECP.  In
her analysis, clitics are X
o
s, hence they block antecedent-government of the t
in I by its coindexed antecedent V in C under Relatived Minimality (Rizzi
1990). Her solution is to apply ‘merging’, an operation by which adjacent
functional X
o
categories into one X
o
. Clitics are generated adjoined to IP, which
can meet the conditions for merging only if IPs are assumed to be specless.
Several of these moves are theoretically costly: a) Adjunction of X
o
to IP
C# Image: Save or Print Document and Image in Web Viewer
or image, you can easily save the changes to DLL Library, including documents TIFF, PDF, Excel, Word string fileName = Request.Form["saveFileName"]; string fid
make pdf form editable in reader; export pdf data to excel
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
extract data from pdf into excel; export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet
Optimal Romanian clitics
37
violates the Structure Preservation Hypothesis.  (b) The specless IP structure
violates standard X’ Theory. (c) Merging in questions is a case of lowering. (d)
The clitic  trace  left  behind by  merging in imperative  structures  must  be
assumed to be invisible for antecedent government. To derive the fact that clitic
pronouns cannot intervene between the clitic auxiliary and the lexical verb,
Dobrovie-Sorin proposes that Romanian auxiliary structures are structurally
distinct from their counterparts in other Romance languages. Instead of heading
an AuxP projection dominating VP, they are assumed to be adjoined to a CP
whose head is occupied by the preposed V-I. Following V-I to C movement,
the clitic pronoun ends up in post-verbal position, which can be observed for
o ‘her’ in the presence of an auxiliary. She derives the preverbal position via
a local rule of clitic climbing characterized as a morpho-phonological process.
It is rather clear that the theoretically undesirable moves she makes are tied to
a framework of inviolable constraints and to the cumbersome syntacticization
of clitics and morphology. As noted above, she, in fact, violates a number of
principles of the theory she assumes. With respect to the important issue of
cross-linguistic variation, she explicitly rejects Rivero’s view that languages
may differ in terms of their functional projections. What she ends up with -- a
constituent structure truly idiosyncratic to Romanian -- does not seem to lead
to  a  more  constrained  typology:  if  Romanian  can  be  idiosyncratic  in  a
particular way, why can’t another language be idiosyncratic in some other
way?
5. Conclusion 
In conclusion, it is useful to step back from particular details of the
optimization process and highlight the main aspects of the proposed theory of
clitics. It is grounded in the characteristic clustering property of clitics. It builds
on earlier claims that clitics belong to the morphology rather than to the syntax
(Klavans  1985;  Anderson  1992).  Like  lexical  affixes,  clitics  instantiate
functional features and they are subject to alignment constraints. The only
significant difference between lexical affixes and clitics is the domain at the
edge of which a particular feature must be realized. If the domain is the word,
the feature is realized as a lexical affix; if the domain is clausal, the feature is
realized as a phrasal affix or clitic.
The main  departure from the  earlier  work  lies in  the claim  that
alignment constraints are violable, a claim independently made in Anderson
(1996). Different alignment constraints regulating the realization of distinct
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
38
features compete for the left edge of the clause; hence they must be violable.
Which one prevails depends on two factors: the input to optimization which
contains the features themselves and thus determines which constraints are
applicable in a particular context, as well as the ranking of the alignment
constraints themselves. The latter constitutes a partial grammar of a given
language. Partial rankings for Romanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian, and Italian
are proposed. They exemplify the OT theory of cross-linguistic variation,
typology by re-ranking. 
From the present perspective, the Romanian puzzle pertaining to its
clitic elements, as well as some of its cross-linguistic extensions, can be solved
in a comparatively simple fashion. Consider each part of the puzzle in turn. 
(1) Why doesn’t a relatively large class of Romanian auxiliaries allow
SA inversion in questions? As is well-known, SA inversion is a syntactic
operation whereby a verbal head moves to an empty head (C) position. The
answer is that clitic auxiliaries are not heads, hence they do not undergo SA
inversion. Instead, the lexical verb itself moves to C with the result that the
subject appears after the lexical verb rather than the auxiliary.
(2) The standard view of syntax requires a landing site for all verbal
elements, including the clitic auxiliary. If the lexical verb is in C, as revealed
by the position of overt subjects, where is the clitic auxiliary? To solve the
problem, Dobrovie-Sorin (1994) posits a complicated constituent structure. In
contrast, the issue does not even arise under the present theory. 
(3)  Why  does  clitic  placement  vary  in  questions  and  positive
imperatives? The answer is two-fold. One part involves the issue of verb
movement: questions involve movement of V to C to satisfy a high-ranked
structural constraint,
O
B
H
D
; imperatives do not involve movement. The other
part of the answer lies with constraint ranking. All morphological features are
subject to E
DGEMOST
(F), including features like [accusative] and [T]. Under
the ranking E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(T), clitic pronouns precede the
finite verbal element. Encliticization in positive imperatives result from a
conjoined  constraint  E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T)  outranking
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
). 
(4) Why do negative imperatives exhibit procliticization rather than
encliticization on the one hand and infinitive rather than finite morphology on
the other? Clitic pronouns are preverbal in negative imperatives because of the
ranking  of  alignment  constraints:
E
DGEMOST
(
ACC
)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
).
Infinitive morphology is interpreted as a failure to parse [T]. In negative
imperatives  [T]  is  unparsed  because  E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E
DGEMOST
(T)
is
undominated:  E
DGEMOST
(
IMP
)&E(
DGEMOST
T)
>>
P
ARSE
(T).  Violating
Optimal Romanian clitics
39
P
ARSE
(T) renders the conjoined constraint vacuous. Thus the morphology is
tied to the relative ranking of P
ARSE
(T) while the placement of clitics is tied to
the relative ranking of E
DGEMOST
(F). Contra Zanuttini (1997), the two features
are independent from one another. This is a desirable result because, cross-
linguistically,  four  types  of  negative  imperatives  are  attested:  infinitive
morphology with procliticization (Romanian), infinitive with encliticitization
(Italian,  Spanish),  finite  morphology  with  procliticization  (Bulgarian*,
Albanian), and finite morphology with encliticization (Slovak*, Czech*, Serbo-
Croatian*, and Macedonian). Starred are so-called Wackernagel languages
(analyzed here as cases where N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F)
>>
E
DGEMOST
(F)). The sample
is quite small and I suspect that second-position clitic languages with infinitive
imperative morphology also exist. If this turns out to be true, then there is no
correlation between finite morphology, clitic placement in negative imperatives
and Wackernagel effects, as predicted by the current analysis, in which they are
respectively governed by the relative ranking of three independent constraint
families: P
ARSE
(F),
E
DGEMOST
(F),
AND 
N
ON
I
NITIAL
(F).
References
Anderson,  S.  (1992).    A-Morphous  morphology.  Cambridge:  Cambridge
University Press.
Anderson, S. (1993). Wackernagel’s revenge: Clitics, morphology and the
syntax of second position. Language 69, 68-98.
Anderson, S. (1996). How to put your clitics in their place or why the best
account 
of second-position phenomena may be something like the
optimal one. 
The linguistic Review 13, 165-191.
Costa, J. (to appear). Word order typology in Optimality Theory. Optimality-
theoretic syntax, edited by G. Legendre, J. Grimshaw, and S. Vikner.
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Dobrovie-Sorin, C. (1994). The syntax of Romanian: Comparative studies in
Romance. Mouton de Gruyter. 
Dobrovie-Sorin, C. (1995). Clitic clusters in Rumanian: Deriving linear order
from  hierarchical  structure.  Advances  in Roumanian  linguistics ,
edited  by  G.  Cinque  and  G.  Giusti,  55-81.  Amsterdam:  John
Benjamins.
Everett, D. L. (1996). Why there are no clitics: An alternative perspective on
pronominal allomorphy. The Summer Institute of Linguistics and the
University of Texas at Arlington Publications in Linguistics.
Comparative studies in Romanian syntax
40
Grimshaw,  J.  (1991).  Extended  projections.  Manuscript.  MA:  Brandeis
University.
Grimshaw, J. (1997). Projection, heads, and optimality. Linguistic Inquiry 28,
373-422.
Grimshaw, J. and V. Samek-Lodovici. (1998). Optimal subjects and subject
universals. Is the best good enough?Optimality and competition in
syntax, edited by P. Barbosa, D. Fox, P. Hagstrom, M. McGinnis, and
D. Pesetsky, 193-219. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Halpern, A. (1995). On the placement and morphology of clitics. Stanford:
CSLI  Publications.
Kayne, R. (1975). French syntax. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Kok, A. de. (1989). On the conjunct object pronoun systems of Rumanian and
French: A comparative analysis. International Journal of Rumanian
Studies 7, 29-29.
Klavans, J. (1985). The independence of syntax and phonology in cliticization.
Language 61, 95-120.
Legendre,  G.  (1996).  Clitics,  verb  (non)-movement,  and  optimality  in
Bulgarian. Technical Report JHU-CogSci-96-5, Baltimore, MD: Johns
Hopkins University.
Legendre, G. (1998a). Optimization in French stylistic and complex Inversion.
Paper presented at the Rutgers University OT Workshop, May 1998.
Legendre, G. (1998b). Generalized optimality-theoretic alignment: The case of
South Slavic  clitics. Paper  presented at  the  University  of  Essex.
November 1998.
Legendre, G. (in press a). Morphological and prosodic alignment of Bulgarian
clitics.Optimality Theory: Syntax, phonology, and acquisition, edited
by J. Dekkers, F. van der Leeuw, and J. van de Weijer. New York:
Oxford University Press.
Legendre, G. (in press b). Morphological and prosodic alignment at work: The
case of South Slavic clitics. Proceedings of WCCFL XVII, edited by
S.J. 
Blake, E.-S. Kim, and K.N. Shahin. Stanford: CSLI Publications.
Legendre, G. (in press c). Second-position clitics in a verb-second language:
Conflict resolution in Macedonian. Proceedings of ESCOL 1997,
edited  by S. Avrutin and D. Jonas. Cornell University: GLC Publications.
Legendre, G., C. Wilson, P. Smolensky, K. Homer, and W. Raymond. (1995).
Optimality and wh-extraction.Papers in Optimality Theory, edited by
J. 
Beckman, S. Urbanczyck, and L. Walsh, 607-636. UMass:UMOP 18.
Legendre, G., P. Smolensky, and C. Wilson. (1998). When is less more?
Faithfulness and minimal links in wh-chains. Is the best good enough?
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested