c# pdf to image free : Save pdf forms in reader control application system web page html .net console how-to-create-successful-html-email-newsletters1-part875

One way to make your email newsletter stand out is give it personality by using HTML 
formatting. Value-added content is an important goal of your email newsletter but it 
goes hand-in hand with good formatting, layout, and style. You can read more about 
those important issues in Chapter 9: Design and Layout 
Characteristics of Good Email Newsletters 
The next few sections introduce some of the characteristics of good email newsletters. 
How do you know when you have a good email newsletter? The ultimate test is whether 
your subscribers read it. However, there are other characteristics that we can target to 
increase the odds that your email newsletter will get read. A list of characteristics of 
good email newsletters will be covered in the next few sections. 
To learn more about good email newsletters, do what the writers of this book have 
done. Take a look at the email newsletters that you read. 
ɸ
What do you like about them?   
ɸ
What do you do with them?   
ɸ
Do you explore all their resources?   
ɸ
Do you skim some articles and more carefully read others?  
ɸ
Do you look forward to opening them when they are in your inbox? 
ɸ
What do you like about their look and feel? 
ɸ
What do you see in the “From:” line or the “Subject:” line that makes 
you want to open the email and read the newsletter? 
ɸ
At least 80% of the content is useful information versus no more than 
20% that is promotional (information about the company and its 
products/services). 
Good email newsletters are read (or skimmed) by subscribers. Subscribers look forward 
to receiving the newsletter in the inbox and they “spend time” with their favorite 
newsletters. They interact with the newsletter. They explore links, request additional 
information, download free reports, worksheets, and white papers; they crunch numbers 
in calculators, look up stock quotes, scroll, and make purchases all through the gateway 
of the email newsletter. 
You want your readers to “stick around” and explore – not only when they visit your 
web site but also when they read your newsletters. When your readers do stick around, 
it helps with an important web metric called “stickiness”. Stickiness is important.   
Introduction to Email Newsletters 
11 
Save pdf forms in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
save data in pdf form reader; pdf data extractor
Save pdf forms in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
It’s also important for the reader to feel that the newsletter is useful, a vibe you must 
provide. Usefulness (utility or value-added) can be best evaluated by answering the 
question: Would a subscriber forward a copy of the newsletter to a friend or colleague? 
If your subscribers truly believe that you are doing a good job as an information 
provider, they probably will spend the time to read and interact with the newsletter. 
They will also forward it to others — giving it “legs”. If subscribers think your 
newsletter is a marketing puff piece, they will quickly delete it from the inbox. 
More on Stickiness 
Email newsletters promote an important e-marketing quality called stickiness. Usually 
discussed by web site administrators as a worthy goal, stickiness must be one of the 
goals of your email newsletter. You want subscribers to spend time reading (or 
skimming) the newsletter because that may also lead to website visits and eventually 
conversions (purchases).
4
Much like web sites, email newsletters can be full of 
resources – links to other information, pictures, diagrams, web site links, downloads, 
etc. Good email newsletters get readers to “poke around”, “browse”, and “kick the 
tires”. Stickiness promotes responses, loyalty, and future purchases. The theory is that if 
your subscribers (and web site visitors) don’t stick around long, they won’t buy. So 
make a list of things you can include in your email newsletter that will promote 
stickiness. 
Viral 
Not only are good email newsletters “sticky”, they spawn or better yet, they clone. 
Readers of your email newsletter should be able to easily forward copies of it to other 
interested parties by simply clicking the FORWARD button in their email software. 
This is what some folks call the “viral” benefit of email newsletters. In an act of the 
simplest form of viral marketing, subscribers will forward a copy of your e-publication 
to friends and colleagues. However, they will only click that “Forward” button if they 
believe that you have provided good newsletter.  
The viral marketing possibility of email newsletters is another reason why you must 
work hard to provide enough useful information. What is enough? That’s a difficult 
12 
4
Research studies show that readers of web site content, emails, and email newsletters tend to skim 
rather than read every word. 
Introduction to Email Newsletters 
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
file in different display formats, and save source PDF introduction to RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document viewer & reader for Windows Forms application, you
java read pdf form fields; how to fill out pdf forms in reader
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
Eaisly save and print designed PDF document using C# code; PDF document viewer can be created in C# Web Forms, Windows Form and mobile applications.
pdf data extraction open source; extract data from pdf to excel online
question to answer. One thing is for sure, if your email newsletter is 90% 
marketing/promotional material or mostly filler and puff, your subscribers will rarely 
forward it. Prepare a great email newsletter, full of value-added information and copies 
of it will multiply across the internet. Subscribers will mention your email newsletters 
in online discussions, chat rooms, and in emails, giving more exposure to your 
messages and opening doors for additional interactions and new subscribers. 
Value-Added Information 
For your email newsletter to be successful and well respected, you must think of 
yourself as an information provider. Information is the lifeblood of many organizations 
and people value information. For years, people have subscribed (and in some cases 
have paid lots of money) to traditional paper based newsletters. Some readers will pay 
hundreds of dollars per year to subscribe to investment advisory newsletters and they 
will continue to do so as long as they believe that the information in the newsletter is 
worth the subscription price.  
Many readers look to newsletters to give them quick snippets of information that they 
can use in their businesses, professions, and everyday life to make a difference. 
Subscribers hope that you can provide them with the kind of information that they could 
only get by doing their own time consuming research. Since you probably have useful 
information or can get your hands on good information, you can share it with your 
customers and prospective customers through your email newsletter. That’s great value. 
Your subscribers will appreciate your effort and you will build valuable and profitable 
customer relationships — relationships that may yield results for years to come. 
As you read through this book and as you develop your email newsletter plan and 
program, keep reminding yourself of this simple assumption. You are an information 
provider! When you write and design a great email newsletter, you show your readers 
(customers and prospective customers) that you are more than a seller of product — you 
are a source of valuable information. Show your subscribers that your email newsletter 
is more than “brochureware”.  
There are so many possibilities for adding value through an email newsletter. Your 
email newsletter should add value so your readers can use it to: 
ɸ
Make intelligent purchase decisions. 
Introduction to Email Newsletters 
13 
VB.NET Word: .NET Word Reader & Processor Control SDK | Online
How to save target Word file (with desired storage like ASP.NET web application, Windows Forms project and for converting Word document file to PDF, png, gif
how to save fillable pdf form in reader; pdf form save with reader
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
with great capabilities to view, annotate, process, save and scan and BMP) and document files (TIFF, PDF and Word NET, VB.NET, ASP.NET and .NET Windows Forms.
pdf data extraction tool; extract data from pdf form to excel
ɸ
Live better lives or do their job better. 
ɸ
Lower costs. 
ɸ
Save time. 
ɸ
Use your product more effectively. 
ɸ
Increase revenues. 
ɸ
Promote their cause. 
ɸ
Stay up-to-date.  
ɸ
Improve careers. 
ɸ
Improve standards of living. 
ɸ
Shape the future. 
ɸ
Enrich intellectual life. 
ɸ
Enrich spiritual life. 
Increase Customer Lifetime Value and Build Relationships 
Many marketing experts talk about increasing customer lifetime value and the 
importance of building long-term relationships with customers. Any informative email 
newsletter helps build relationships and customer loyalty. Every well-done email 
newsletter builds stronger links between you and your customers (and prospects). One 
of the value-added functions of any good marketing program is to provide information 
that prospective customers can use to make purchase decisions. Remember the simple 
selling model? Persuasion leads to conversion which can lead to revenue. As you work 
this formula over and over (with the aid of your email newsletter) you are adding to 
customer lifetime value.  
Introduction to Email Newsletters 
14 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms like Png, Bmp, Gif, .NET Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and save them into
exporting data from pdf to excel; extracting data from pdf to excel
Save, Print Image in .NET Winforms | Online Tutorials
PDF Generator. PDF Reader. Twain Scanning. DICOM Reading. ISIS & printing capabilities into your Windows Forms applications Save images & documents to the disk; Save
how to extract data from pdf to excel; extract data from pdf file
It’s About Content 
Content, Content, Content 
Content is king!  Great formatting, pictures, color, e-metrics and web tricks cannot save 
an email newsletter that was developed with poor content. All the tracking of clicks, all 
the innovative ways to build a database of email addresses, and fancy HTML formatting 
will not make an email newsletter with poor content successful. Most of the value of an 
email newsletter is in the information it provides. Period! Invest in content before you 
invest in anything else. You must have something to say that is interesting, useful, and 
compelling or the email newsletter will be a huge waste of time for everyone involved, 
especially for customers and prospects, who will see your email newsletter as just 
another piece of spam. 
Choosing Content 
Where will you get your content for your email newsletter? Will you write all the 
content yourself, get others to write it for you, or use 'recycled' articles from other 
writers? Fresh, original content is always the best. If you don't think you can manage 
writing all of the content, perhaps you can compromise: consider writing most of the 
articles with the occasional third-party article.  
As you decide what content to put into your email newsletter, think about one of the 
basic goals of any newsletter – to build a relationship. Remember that your entry into 
the world of email newsletter publishing is not about replacing your direct mail pieces 
with a thinly disguised email newsletter sent cheaply via email. Your foray into this 
field is about building stronger customer relationships with current and prospective 
customers. It is in that light that you should gather and develop factual and solid 
content. People rationalize purchases (conversions) based on facts. Present the facts in 
your newsletter. 
Also remember that you are an expert in your field and that as an expert, you have much 
information to offer. For example, if you are a mortgage broker who writes a newsletter, 
you can bet that most of the people who read your newsletter are not mortgage brokers. 
They want to know some of the tidbits, tips, advice, and trends that you know and that 
It’s About Content 
15 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document in both web server-side application and Windows Forms project using doc2.Save(outPutFilePath Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using
extract data from pdf file to excel; export pdf data to excel
C# PDF: Start to Create, Load and Save PDF Document
APIs will be used to achieve PDF document saving in void Save(String fileName); void SaveToStream(Stream stream ASP.NET AJAX, Silverlight, Windows Forms as well
extract data from pdf form; how to fill pdf form in reader
you clearly see and can explain. They want to know what you know about interest rate 
trends, closing costs, credit report errors, credit repair, and innovative loan programs. 
Why not share what you know via your email newsletter? 
What is there about your industry, products, services, and your organization that your 
readers would like to know more about? There’s probably a lot! Your subscribers don’t 
work in your field nor do they have the richness of experiences that you have. Tell them 
a story! Think about how you share that in interesting, engaging, and interactive ways.  
For example, Eenie Meenie Records in Los Angeles doesn’t just use their newsletter to 
promote their artists and advertise – they actively seek feedback and content from their 
customers with contests and exclusive offers, even private shows and chances to meet 
the bands they enjoy.  If you can pull that off, you will be a long way towards your goal 
of creating a great email newsletter. 
A newsletter adds value by offering relevant and truly useful articles your customers 
can’t find anywhere else. And you write these articles by taking the intelligence and 
expertise you accumulate every day and packaging it for your customers in helpful, 
easily digested portions. Explain new technologies. Decipher relevant legislation. 
Forecast trends. Chime in on industry debates. Give your customers the knowledge and 
understanding they need to become better customers.
5
Figure 2.1 shows an example of an email newsletter that is aimed at its target audience 
and engages them by not only telling a story, but telling it in a different way.  Michael 
Katz’s E-Newsletter on E-Newsletters gives readers suggestions for content and writing 
tips in an engaging manner.  This example talks about how the writer became a fan of 
country music and uses it as a metaphor for finding your audience – a unique approach 
that does more than just give facts. 
16 
5
B2B E-Newsletters Done Right, Build relationships by Helping, not by Selling
, by Mark Scapicchio.  
Mark has written advertising and marketing copy for some of the best-known companies and advertising 
agencies in the world, and for many successful smaller companies.  To learn more about his background, 
his clients, and how he can improve your copy visit his Web site at www.scapicchio.com
It’s About Content 
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
ASP.NET web application or .NET Windows Forms project, without Allow VB.NET developers to save source image file to multi-page document files, like PDF and Word
how to make a pdf form fillable in reader; extract pdf data to excel
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Windows Word Viewer | Online
Word documents displaying, processing and printing in .NET Windows Forms project. Word Windows Viewer enables developers to load, view, process, save and print
export pdf form data to excel; extract table data from pdf
Figure 2.1 Michael Katz’s E-Newsletter on E-Newsletters  
Keep Track of Ideas 
Writer’s block or even a lack of ideas can be a problem when writing any publication. 
However, if you are excited about your subject, then you probably won’t have that 
problem. Perhaps the reverse will be true — you may have an abundance of ideas. 
However, if you are concerned that you will be tripped up by some form of writer’s 
block, start keeping a list of content ideas in your planner, notebook or PDA. Or 
It’s About Content 
17 
maintain a word processing file of content ideas that you update once or twice a week. 
Ask your readers to suggest topics. The ideas will pile up. In the end, the challenge 
won’t be in coming up with ideas — the biggest challenge will be how to filter and 
prioritize the information so that you can best serve the needs of your specific target 
market – the subscribers of your email newsletter. 
Target Audience 
Who would likely subscribe to your email newsletter? Good writing starts with knowing 
your reader. Can you think about the typical subscriber and what they might ask you 
about?  For instance, Publishers Weekly sends emails to specific segments of the 
publishing market on a weekly basis – libraries get content dedicated to their portion of 
the industry, bookstores get content related to retail operations, etc. 
The ultimate goal of your email newsletter is to engage readers who will eventually do 
business with your organization. Therefore, keep in mind that you are trying to attract 
readers who will eventually buy from you. For example, if you are a financial planner 
whose services are geared towards wealthy individuals, your estate planning articles 
might be focused on estates of greater than $2 million dollars. That group is quite 
different from the young couple struggling to buy their first home. Their information 
needs are quite different. The wealthy person might want to know how to shelter 
income from taxes and how to protect assets from estate taxes. On the other hand, the 
young couple might want information about how to buy and finance a home or how to 
start saving for retirement. 
To really get to know your subscribers, you should develop a subscriber profile. This 
profile should be quite similar to the profile that marketers would develop for your 
customers. The profile might include: 
ɸ
Where they live  
ɸ
Gender 
ɸ
Job title 
ɸ
Job function  
ɸ
Industry 
ɸ
Company size 
ɸ
Company sales volume  
It’s About Content 
18 
ɸ
Age 
ɸ
Occupation 
ɸ
Income range 
ɸ
Cars they drive 
ɸ
Children and what ages 
ɸ
Hobbies 
ɸ
Where they shop 
If you do a good job identifying your subscribers and their needs and you work hard to 
develop appropriate content, your readers will eventually come to the conclusion that 
what you write about, helps. That direct link between what you write about and how 
you can help your subscribers is powerful. You need to develop that link to be 
successful over the long run.   
Have you ever read a company’s newsletter articles and then fail to see any link to the 
services and products of that company? That’s a big no-no. Your articles should make 
your subscribers want to learn more about your offerings. Your content should make 
subscribers request additional information. Newsletter content should offer useful 
product and service related information, that’s the critical link you want to have in 
every issue.  There is an insurance agency that has a newsletter that includes food 
recipes. Recipes are popular tidbits of information but how do they help sell more 
insurance products and services?  Unless you are the owner of a food service company, 
how will recipes contribute to the success of your business? Over the long run, content 
like that doesn’t directly link to your business mission is more like filler or fluff. It does 
little to develop profitable relationships. Remember the simple model of selling – 
persuasion leads to conversion which leads to revenue. You need to “trace” how your 
content “works” the selling model. 
Question Yourself as you Write 
You need to perform a thorough analysis of your readers’ needs before you write. That 
is a critical success factor of newsletter writing. Think about the information you need 
to convey and anticipate questions your reader might have after reading your email 
newsletter. The answers to those questions should then be incorporated into the first 
draft of the newsletter. Here are some more questions you might ask yourself as you 
rough out your first draft of the newsletter: 
It’s About Content 
19 
ɸ
How familiar are your readers with your topics? How much do you need 
to explain? 
ɸ
What additional information, tables, pictures, diagrams, and charts will 
enhance your message and provide value to the customer/prospect? 
ɸ
Are you overstating your case? When you overstate, the reader will be 
on guard and then you risk losing their confidence. 
ɸ
Are you being objective? This is difficult to do when promoting your 
organization, services, and products. 
ɸ
Have you weeded out subjective statements or superlative phrases? 
Most readers are skeptical of exaggeration or over-reaching wording. 
Do not reduce your credibility by using superlatives. Readers want facts 
and objectivity. 
ɸ
Is your tone and content appropriate based on your target audience? 
Your choices of tone include: 
ɸ
Casual 
ɸ
Informal 
ɸ
Personal 
ɸ
Scholarly 
ɸ
Formal 
ɸ
Does the level of complexity or technical information in your newsletter 
match the level of your subscribers?  
ɸ
Will your subscribers perceive your newsletter as a benefit?  
ɸ
If your subscriber base is global or from diverse backgrounds, be careful 
in your use of jargon, slang, and clichés. Jargon, slang, and clichés are 
easily misunderstood. If you insist on using jargon, please explain the 
meaning of the word so that no-one feels left out. 
I ’s About Content 
t
20 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested