ghostscript.net convert pdf to image c# : Converting a word document to a fillable pdf form control software system azure windows web page console Web_Access_Workbook0-part159

A Web Accessibility Primer 
Usability for Everyone 
Office of Web Communications 
Cornell University
2007 
Converting a word document to a fillable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf forms to fillable; create fillable forms in pdf
Converting a word document to a fillable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert excel to fillable pdf form; change font size in pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; PDF document can be converted from ODT by using following C# demo code Following sample code may help you with converting ODP to PDF
pdf fill form; create fillable pdf form from word
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET VB.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF from Microsoft Office Excel
convert pdf form fillable; convert word to pdf fillable form
Unless otherwise noted, all materials on this site are Copyright © 2007 Cornell University. All 
rights reserved. 
All Cornell copyrighted content on this Web site may be modified, reproduced and distributed in 
print or electronic format only if offered at no cost to recipients and as long as full credit is given 
to Cornell University. Note that some sections and text are drawn from other sources with similar 
copyright policies, particularly WebAIM (www.webaim.org). Due credit should be given to 
these sources as appropriate.  
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET Tutorial for Creating PDF document from MS Office Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF.
auto fill pdf form from excel; convert html form to pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF.
change font in pdf fillable form; create a pdf form to fill out and save
Table of Contents 
I.
Introduction to Web Accessibility 
5
People with Disabilities Using the Web 
6 
Resources 
Cornell’s Approach to Web Accessibility 
8 
Accessible Design is Good Design 
Accessibility Standards 
Checking in at Cornell 
Policy and Section 508 
11 
Basics of Accessible Design 
12 
Think Access 
12 
Accessible Design Principles 
12 
Evaluating for Access 
14 
II.
Cross-cutting Accessibility Strategies 
16
Labeling and Structure 
16 
Color Use 
16 
Acronyms 
17
Hyperlinking 
17
Avoid Flickering Images 
17 
Tables 
18 
Image Use and Alternative text (alt-text) 
19 
Forms 
20 
Audio and Video Media 
21 
Text Presentation and Formatting 
22 
Writing Style 
22 
Timed Responses 
22 
III.
Creating Downloadable Files 
23
Creating Accessible Word Documents 
24 
Use Real Headings 
24 
Make Real Lists 
25 
Improve Tables 
25 
Describe Images 
26 
Resources on Word 
27 
Making Adobe PDF Content Accessible 
28 
Improving PDF accessibility 
28 
Resources on PDFs 
30 
Creating Accessible Excel Spreadsheet Content 
31 
Resources on Excel 
31 
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
1
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable may help you with converting PowerPoint(.pptx PDF document can be converted from PowerPoint2003 by
asp.net fill pdf form; change pdf to fillable form
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Creating Accessible PowerPoint Content 
32 
Guidelines for Increasing PowerPoint File Accessibility 
33 
Resources on PowerPoint 
34 
IV.
Making “Regular” Web Pages Accessible – HTML 
35
HTML Authoring Tools 
36 
Using Dreamweaver to Create Accessible HTML 
36 
Microsoft’s Editors – FrontPage and Expression Web Designer 
37 
HTML Accessibility 
38 
Content and Structure 
38 
Forms 
40 
Images in HTML Pages 
41 
Keyboard Accessibility 
43 
Frames 
44 
Tables 
44 
Resources on HTML Authoring 
46 
V.
Beyond HTML: CSS, JavaScript, Plug-ins 
47
Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) 
47 
Resources on CSS 
48 
JavaScripts 
49 
JavaScript Accessibility Issues 
49 
Resources on JavaScript 
49 
Plug-ins 
50 
Making plug-ins more accessible 
50 
Resources on Plug-ins 
50 
VI.
CommonSpot and BlackBoard 
51
CommonSpot 
51 
BlackBoard 
52
VII.
Choosing and Converting File Types 
53
Appendix A – 508 Guidelines from A to P 
54
The Section 508 Guidelines for the Web 
54 
Resources on Section 508 
55 
Appendix B – Related Accessibility Resources 
56
Cornell Resources 
56 
General Resources 
56 
Checklists 
56 
Link Collections 
57 
Online Courses and Tutorials 
57 
Resources by Topic 
58 
Introductions to Accessibility 
58 
Specific Disabilities and Web Access 
58 
Accessibility Standards 
58 
Evaluation Resources 
59 
Images and Alt-text 
59 
Transcripts and Captions for Audio/Visual Media 
60 
Writing 
60 
Microsoft Word 
60 
Adobe PDFs 
60 
Microsoft Excel 
61 
Microsoft PowerPoint 
61 
HTML 
61 
Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) 
62 
JavaScript 
63 
Plug-ins 
63 
Converting Files 
63 
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
3
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Part I - Introduction 
When did you last access the internet? What did you use it for? Imagine, now, going to those 
same web sites and trying to use them if you were blind, deaf, had cognitive trouble dealing with 
large amounts of content, or couldn’t use your arms. At Cornell, we have about 800 students, 
plus many staff and faculty, with disabilities. Also, of course, many of our website visitors from 
outside the University, whether prospective faculty or students, or alumni, or the general public, 
have disabilities that affect their web use.  
In many ways, the internet is one of the best things that ever happened to people with disabilities. 
For example, blind people can now access newspapers with screen readers that read the text 
aloud. They don't have to wait for expensive audio tapes or costly, and bulky, Braille printouts. 
On the other hand, when not designed accessibly, the web creates all kinds of barriers to people 
with disabilities. What if a newspaper webpage is not screen-reader 
accessible? What if a video clip has no captions for deaf people? What if a 
page is only useable with a mouse, and you don’t have use of your arms or 
hands? 
With support from this workbook, this workshop should help you: 
Better understand the barriers and frustrations people with disabilities face with 
inaccessible websites. 
Know what web accessibility means. 
Make the websites and site content you are responsible for more accessible to both 
people with disabilities, and users generally. 
This workshop does not provide full technical training in designing accessible web content. 
Instead, it introduces you to key concepts and strategies. In some cases, this workbook will tell 
you all you need to know to make your sites accessible. In other cases, when you’ll need 
particular technical skills or procedures, it refers you to outside resources that you can use on 
your own as you need them.  
While this workbook is designed to be used in a face-to-face workshop, you could also use it on 
your own as a primer on creating and maintaining accessible websites.  
I.  Introduction to Web Accessibility 
This section introduces the kinds of disabilities that affect web use, Cornell’s 
approach to making our websites accessible, and what web accessibility means. 
It should help you: 
Describe the kinds of barriers people with varied disabilities face when they 
encounter inaccessible websites. 
Feel empathy for people who encounter inaccessible websites. 
Motivate yourself to try to make sites that you are responsible for accessible. 
Understand Cornell’s basic approach to web accessibility. 
List some key components of making a site accessible. 
Understand web accessibility as a process, rather than an end. 
Identify some ways your own web sites might be inaccessible. 
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
5
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
People with Disabilities Using the Web 
Up to 20% of Americans have some kind of disability. The major kinds that affect web use 
include: 
Visual – blindness, low vision, color-blindness 
Hearing – deafness 
Motor  – inability to use a mouse, slow response time, limited fine motor control 
Cognitive  – includes learning disabilities, inability to focus on lots of data 
Adaptations, often quite simple ones, can make our Cornell websites accessible to most people 
with most kinds of disabilities. Also, usually, these adaptations benefit nearly everyone, not just 
people with disabilities. Almost everyone benefits from helpful illustrations, properly-organized 
content and clear navigation. Similarly, while deaf users need captions, they are also helpful for 
people who need to view a video without audio, for example in the office or at home with 
children playing loudly.  
These two exercises may help those of you without disabilites glimpse 
what using the web can be like for people who do have visual or motor 
impairments. 
Visual: Screen readers, such as JAWS, read web page content aloud for 
people who have low or no vision. Try this simulation, and the associated 
exercise, for an insight into what using a screen reader is like: 
www.webaim.org/simulations/screenreader-sim.htm (Shockwave 
required). 
Motor: People who don’t have use of their arms or hands sometimes 
navigate the web via the keyboard, hitting keys with a stick in their 
mouths. But this requires site design that allows for exclusive keyboard 
navigation. Go to one of your favorite websites. Try getting around the 
pages using just the keyboard, without using a mouse. Can you do it? 
Resources 
The succinct web-based presentation, “A Quick and Dirty Introduction to Accessibility,” at 
www.maxdesign.com.au/presentation/accessibility provides an excellent introduction to web 
accessibility, along with links to explore assistive technologies available to people with different 
kinds of disabilities. 
WebAIM’s introduction to web accessibility at www.webaim.org/intro
is also a good starting 
point, with further links to experiences and needs specific to particular kinds of disabilities. Their 
series of articles on the user’s perspective at www.webaim.org/articles
provide great insight into 
the way people with various kinds of disabilities access the web, or can be prevented from 
accessing by bad web design. The articles often include short videos and exercises as well.  
Disability-specific Resources 
WebAIM has extensive resources, including simulations, about making the web accessible to 
people with visual disabilities. For example, visit www.webaim.org/techniques/screenreader/
for 
more details on screen readers in particular, with links to further resources available at the end.  
WebAIM’s section on deafness, at www.webaim.org/articles/auditory
, provides some insight 
into hearing loss and how this impacts web use. 
The short article “Making the Web Accessible for the Deaf, Hearing and Mobility Impaired,” at 
www.samizdat.com/pac2.htm
, provides some quick tips on accessible design for people with 
auditory or motor disabilities. The short article “Web Design for the Mobility-Impaired,” at 
www.ptvguy.com/accessibility-web-design-for-the-mobility-impaired
, provides some additional 
tips.  
The authors of “An Accessibility Frontier: Cognitive disabilities and learning difficulties” 
provide guidance in these areas at www.usability.com.au/resources/cognitive.cfm
.  
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested