ghostscript.net convert pdf to image c# : Create pdf fill in form control SDK system web page wpf winforms console pspp2-part1610

Chapter 5: Using pspp
13
5 Using pspp
pspp is a toolfor the statistical analysis of sampled data. You can use it to discover patterns
in the data, to explain differences in one subset of data in terms of another subset and to
find out whether certain beliefs about the data are justified. This chapter does not attempt
to introduce the theory behind the statistical analysis, but it shows how such analysis can
be performed using pspp.
For the purposes of this tutorial, it is assumed that you are using pspp in its interactive
mode from the command line. However, the example commands can also be typed into a
file and executed in a post-hoc mode by typing ‘pspp filename’ at a shell prompt, where
filename is the name of the file containing the commands. Alternatively, from the graphical
interface, you can select File ! New ! Syntax to open a new syntax window and use the
Run menu when a syntax fragment is ready to be executed. Whichever method you choose,
the syntax is identical.
When using the interactive method, pspp tells you that it’s waiting for your data with
astring like PSPP> or data>. In the examples of this chapter, whenever you see text like
this, it indicates the prompt displayed by pspp, not something that you should type.
Throughout this chapter reference is made to a number of sample data files. So that
you can try the examples for yourself, you should have received these files along with your
copy of pspp.
1
Please note:
Normally these files are installed in the directory
/usr/local/share/pspp/examples. If however your system administrator or
operating system vendor has chosen to install them in a different location, you
will have to adjust the examples accordingly.
5.1 Preparation of Data Files
Before analysis can commence, the data must be loaded into pspp and arranged such that
both pspp and humans can understand what the data represents. There are two aspects of
data:
 The variables — these are the parameters of a quantity which has been measured or
estimated in some way. For example height, weight and geographic location are all
variables.
 The observations (also called ‘cases’) of the variables — each observation represents an
instance when the variables were measured or observed.
For example, a data set which has the variables height, weight, and name, might have the
observations:
1881 89.2 Ahmed
1192 107.01 Frank
1230 67 Julie
The following sections explain how to define a dataset.
1
These files contain purely fictitious data. They should not be used for research purposes.
Create pdf fill in form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf fillable form; create a writable pdf form
Create pdf fill in form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
converting a word document to a fillable pdf form; add signature field to pdf
Chapter 5: Using pspp
14
5.1.1 Defining Variables
Variables come in two basic types, viz: numeric and string. Variables such as age, height
and satisfaction are numeric, whereas name is a string variable. String variables are best
reserved for commentary data to assist the human observer. However they can also be used
for nominal or categorical data.
Example 5.1defines two variables forename e andheight, , andreadsdata intothemby
manual input.
PSPP> data list list /forename (A12) height.
PSPP> begin data.
data> Ahmed 188
data> Bertram 167
data> Catherine 134.231
data> David 109.1
data> end data
PSPP>
 
Example 5.1: Manual entry of data using the DATA LIST command. Two variables
forename and height are defined and subsequently filled with manually entered data.
There are several things to note about this example.
 The words ‘data list list’ are an example of the DATA LIST command. See
Section 8.5 [DATA LIST], page 66. It t tells s pspp toprepare e for readingdata. . The
word ‘list’ intentionally appears twice. The first occurrence is part of the DATA LIST
call, whilst the second tells pspp that the data is to be read as free format data with
one record per line.
 The ‘/’ character is important. It marks the start of the list of variables which you
wish to define.
 The text ‘forename’ is the name of the first variable, and ‘(A12)’ says that the variable
forename is a string variable and that its maximum length is 12 bytes. The second
variable’s name is specified by the text ‘height’. Since no format is given, this variable
has the default format. Normally the default format expects numeric data, which
should be entered in the locale of the operating system. Thus, the example is correct
for English locales and other locales which use a period (‘.’) as the decimal separator.
However if you are using a system with a locale which uses the comma (‘,’) as the
decimal separator, then you should in the subsequent lines substitute ‘.’ with ‘,’.
Alternatively, you could explicitly tell pspp that the height variable is to be read
using a period as its decimal separator by appending the text ‘DOT8.3’ after the word
‘height’. For more information on data formats, seeSection6.7.4[InputandOutput
Formats], page 34.
 Normally, pspp displays the prompt PSPP> whenever it’s expecting a command. How-
ever, when it’s expecting data, the prompt changes to data> so that you know to enter
data and not a command.
 At the end of every command there is a terminating ‘.’ which tells pspp that the end
of a command has been encountered. You should not enter ‘.’ when data is expected
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Document Protect. Apply password to protect PDF. Allow to create digital signature.
convert pdf form fillable; convert word form to fillable pdf form
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
3.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password setting passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form.
convert word form to fillable pdf; create a fillable pdf form
Chapter 5: Using pspp
15
(ie. when the data> prompt is current) since it is appropriate only for terminating
commands.
5.1.2 Listing the data
Once the data has been entered, you could type
PSPP> list /format=numbered.
to list the data. The optional text ‘/format=numbered’ requests the case numbers to be
shown along with the data. It should show the following output:
Case#
forename
height
----- ------------ --------
1 Ahmed
188.00
2 Bertram
167.00
3 Catherine
134.23
4 David
109.10
Note that the numeric variable height is displayed to 2 decimal places, because the format
for that variable is ‘F8.2’. For a complete description of the LIST command, seeSection8.10
[LIST], page 76.
5.1.3 Reading data from a text file
The previous example showed how to define a set of variables and to manually enter the
data for those variables. Manual entering of data is tedious work, and often a file containing
the data will be have been previously prepared. Let us assume that you have a file called
mydata.dat containing the ascii encoded data:
Ahmed
188.00
Bertram
167.00
Catherine
134.23
David
109.10
.
.
.
Zachariah
113.02
You can can tell the DATA LIST command to read the data directly from this file instead of
by manual entry, with a command like:
PSPP> data list file=’mydata.dat’ list /forename (A12) height.
Notice however, that it is still necessary to specify the names of the variables and their
formats, since this information is not contained in the file. It is also possible to specify
the file’s character encoding and other parameters. For full details refer to seeSection8.5
[DATA LIST], page 66.
5.1.4 Reading data from a pre-preparedpspp file
When working with other pspp users, or users of other software which uses the pspp data
format, you may be given the data in a pre-prepared pspp file. Such files contain not only
the data, but the variable definitions, along with their formats, labels and other meta-data.
Conventionally, these files (sometimes called “system” files) have the suffix .sav, but that
is not mandatory. The following syntax loads a file called my-file.sav.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
converting a word document to pdf fillable form; pdf add signature field
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a password setting passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form.
convert word form to pdf with fillable; best pdf form filler
Chapter 5: Using pspp
16
PSPP> get file=’my-file.sav’.
You will encounter several instances of this in future examples.
5.1.5 Saving data to apspp file.
If you want to save your data, along with the variable definitions so that you or other pspp
users can use it later, you can do this with the SAVE command.
The following syntax will save the existing data and variables to a file called my-new-
file.sav.
PSPP> save outfile=’my-new-file.sav’.
If my-new-file.sav already exists, then it will be overwritten. Otherwise it will be created.
5.1.6 Reading data from other sources
Sometimes it’s useful to be able to readdata fromcomma separated text, from spreadsheets,
databases or other sources. In these instances you should use the GET DATA command (see
Section 9.4 [GET DATA], page 83).
5.1.7 Exiting PSPP
Use the FINISH command to exit PSPP:
PSPP> finish.
5.2 Data Screening and Transformation
Once data has been entered, it is often desirable, or even necessary, to transform it in some
way before performing analysis upon it. At the very least, it’s good practice to check for
errors.
5.2.1 Identifying incorrect data
Data from real sources is rarely error free. pspp has a number of procedures which can be
used to help identify data which might be incorrect.
The DESCRIPTIVES command (see Section 15.1 [DESCRIPTIVES], page 128) is used
to generate simple linear statistics for a dataset. It is also useful for identifying potential
problems in the data. The example file physiology.sav contains a number of physiological
measurements of a sample of healthy adults selected at random. However, the data entry
clerk made a number of mistakes when entering the data. Example5.2 illustrates the use
of DESCRIPTIVES to screen this data and identify the erroneous values.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
convert word to pdf fillable form online; create fillable form from pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
create fill pdf form; create a pdf form to fill out and save
Chapter 5: Using pspp
17
PSPP> get file=’/usr/local/share/pspp/examples/physiology.sav’.
PSPP> descriptives sex, weight, height.
Output:
DESCRIPTIVES. Valid cases = 40; cases with missing value(s) = 0.
+--------#--+-------+-------+-------+-------+
|Variable# N| Mean |Std Dev|Minimum|Maximum|
#========#==#=======#=======#=======#=======#
|sex
#40|
.45|
.50|
.00|
1.00|
|height #40|1677.12| 262.87| 179.00|1903.00|
|weight #40| 72.12| 26.70| -55.60| 92.07|
+--------#--+-------+-------+-------+-------+
 
Example 5.2: Using the DESCRIPTIVES command to display simple summary information
about the data. In this case, the results show unexpectedly low values in the Minimum
column, suggesting incorrect data entry.
In the output ofExample5.2, the most interesting column is the minimum value. The
weight variable has a minimum value of less than zero, which is clearly erroneous. Similarly,
the height variable’s minimumvalue seems to be very low. Infact, it is more than 5 standard
deviations from the mean, and is a seemingly bizarre height for an adult person. We can
examine the data in more detail with the EXAMINE command (seeSection15.3[EXAMINE],
page 131):
InExample5.3you can see that the lowest value of height is 179 (which we suspect to be
erroneous), but the second lowest is 1598 which we know from the DESCRIPTIVES command
is within 1 standard deviation from the mean. Similarly the weight variable has a lowest
value which is negative but a plausible value for the second lowest value. This suggests that
the two extreme values are outliers and probably represent data entry errors.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
create a fillable pdf form in word; convert fillable pdf to html form
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
create fillable form pdf online; create a pdf with fields to fill in
Chapter 5: Using pspp
18
[. .. continue fromExample5.2]
PSPP> examine height, weight /statistics=extreme(3).
Output:
#===============================#===========#=======#
#
#Case Number| Value #
#===============================#===========#=======#
#Height in millimetres Highest 1#
14|1903.00#
#
2#
15|1884.00#
#
3#
12|1801.65#
#
----------#-----------+-------#
#
Lowest 1#
30| 179.00#
#
2#
31|1598.00#
#
3#
28|1601.00#
#
----------#-----------+-------#
#Weight in kilograms
Highest 1#
13| 92.07#
#
2#
5| 92.07#
#
3#
17| 91.74#
#
----------#-----------+-------#
#
Lowest 1#
38| -55.60#
#
2#
39| 54.48#
#
3#
33| 55.45#
#===============================#===========#=======#
 
Example 5.3: Using the EXAMINE command to see the extremities of the data for different
variables. Cases 30 and 38 seem to contain values very much lower than the rest of the
data. They are possibly erroneous.
5.2.2 Dealing with suspicious data
If possible, suspect data should be checked and re-measured. However, this may not always
be feasible, in which case the researcher may decide to disregard these values. pspp has
a feature whereby data can assume the special value ‘SYSMIS’, and will be disregarded
in future analysis. SeeSection6.6[MissingObservations],page32. You can set the two
suspect values to the ‘SYSMIS’ value using the RECODE command.
pspp
> recode height (179 = SYSMIS).
pspp
> recode weight (LOWEST THRU 0 = SYSMIS).
The first command says that for any observation which has a height value of 179, that
value should be changed to the SYSMIS value. The second command says that any weight
values of zero or less should be changed to SYSMIS. From now on, they will be ignored in
analysis. For detailed information about the RECODE command seeSection12.7[RECODE],
page 117.
Chapter 5: Using pspp
19
If you now re-run the DESCRIPTIVES or EXAMINE commands in Example 5.2 and
Example 5.3youwillseeadatasummarywithmoreplausibleparameters. Youwillalso
notice that the data summaries indicate the two missing values.
5.2.3 Inverting negatively coded variables
Data entry errors are not the only reason for wanting to recode data. The sample file
hotel.sav comprises data gathered from a customer satisfaction survey of clients at a par-
ticular hotel. InExample5.4,this file is loadedfor analysis. The line display dictionary.
tells pspp to display the variables and associated data. The output from this command has
been omitted from the example for the sake of clarity, but you will notice that each of the
variables v1, v2 . .. v5 are measured on a 5 point Likert scale, with 1 meaning “Strongly
disagree” and 5 meaning “Strongly agree”. Whilst variables v1, v2 and v4 record responses
to a positively posed question, variables v3 and v5 are responses to negatively worded ques-
tions. In order to perform meaningful analysis, we need to recode the variables so that they
all measure in the same direction. We could use the RECODE command, with syntax such
as:
recode v3 (1 = 5) (2 = 4) (4 = 2) (5 = 1).
However an easier and more elegant way uses the COMPUTE command (see Section 12.3
[COMPUTE], page 114). Sincethevariables s areLikertvariablesintherange(1 ... . 5),
subtracting their value from 6 has the effect of inverting them:
compute var = 6 - var.
Example 5.4usesthistechniquetorecodethevariablesv3andv5.AfterapplyingCOMPUTE
for both variables, all subsequent commands will use the inverted values.
5.2.4 Testing data consistency
A sensible check to perform on survey data is the calculation of reliability. This gives
the statistician some confidence that the questionnaires have been completed thoughtfully.
If you examine the labels of variables v1, v3 and v4, you will notice that they ask very
similar questions. One would therefore expect the values of these variables (after recoding)
to closely follow one another, and we can test that with the RELIABILITY command (see
Section 15.17 [RELIABILITY], page 154). Example 5.4 shows apsppsessionwhere the
user (after recoding negatively scaled variables) requests reliability statistics for v1, v3 and
v4.
Chapter 5: Using pspp
20
PSPP> get file=’/usr/local/share/pspp/examples/hotel.sav’.
PSPP> display dictionary.
PSPP> * recode negatively worded questions.
PSPP> compute v3 = 6 - v3.
PSPP> compute v5 = 6 - v5.
PSPP> reliability v1, v3, v4.
Output (dictionary information omitted for clarity):
1.1 RELIABILITY. Case Processing Summary
#==============#==#======#
#
# N|
% #
#==============#==#======#
#Cases Valid
#17|100.00#
#
Excluded# 0|
.00#
#
Total
#17|100.00#
#==============#==#======#
1.2 RELIABILITY. Reliability Statistics
#================#==========#
#Cronbach’s Alpha#N of Items#
#================#==========#
#
.81#
3#
#================#==========#
 
Example 5.4: Recoding negatively scaled variables, and testing for reliability with the
RELIABILITY command. The CronbachAlpha coefficient suggests ahighdegree of reliability
among variables v1, v3 and v4.
As a rule of thumb, many statisticians consider a value of Cronbach’s Alpha of 0.7 or
higher to indicate reliable data. Here, the value is 0.81 so the data and the recoding that
we performed are vindicated.
5.2.5 Testing for normality
Many statistical tests rely upon certain properties of the data. One common property, upon
which many linear tests depend, is that of normality — the data must have been drawn
from a normal distribution. It is necessary then to ensure normality before deciding upon
the test procedure to use. One way to do this uses the EXAMINE command.
InExample5.5, a researcher was examining the failure rates of equipment produced by
an engineering company. The file repairs.sav contains the mean time between failures
(mtbf) of some items of equipment subject to the study. Before performing linear analysis
on the data, the researcher wanted to ascertain that the data is normally distributed.
Anormal distribution has a skewness and kurtosis of zero. Looking at the skewness
of mtbf inExample 5.5 it is clear that the mtbf figures have a lot of positive skew and
are therefore not drawn from a normally distributed variable. Positive skew can often be
Chapter 5: Using pspp
21
compensated for by applying a logarithmic transformation. This is done with the COMPUTE
command in the line
compute mtbf_ln = ln (mtbf).
Rather than redefining the existing variable, this use of COMPUTE defines a new variable
mtbf
ln which is the natural logarithm of mtbf. The final command in this example calls
EXAMINE on this new variable, and it can be seen from the results that both the skewness
and kurtosis for mtbf
ln are very close to zero. This provides some confidence that the
mtbf
ln variable is normally distributed and thus safe for linear analysis. In the event that
no suitable transformation can be found, then it would be worth considering an appropriate
non-parametric test instead of a linear one. SeeSection15.11[NPARTESTS],page144,
for information about non-parametric tests.
Chapter 5: Using pspp
22
PSPP> get file=’/usr/local/share/pspp/examples/repairs.sav’.
PSPP> examine mtbf
/statistics=descriptives.
PSPP> compute mtbf_ln = ln (mtbf).
PSPP> examine mtbf_ln
/statistics=descriptives.
Output:
1.2 EXAMINE. Descriptives
#====================================================#=========#==========#
#
#Statistic|Std. Error#
#====================================================#=========#==========#
#mtbf
Mean
#
8.32 |
1.62
#
#
95% Confidence Interval for Mean Lower Bound#
4.85 |
#
#
Upper Bound# 11.79 |
#
#
5% Trimmed Mean
#
7.69 |
#
#
Median
#
8.12 |
#
#
Variance
# 39.21 |
#
#
Std. Deviation
#
6.26 |
#
#
Minimum
#
1.63 |
#
#
Maximum
# 26.47 |
#
#
Range
# 24.84 |
#
#
Interquartile Range
#
5.83 |
#
#
Skewness
#
1.85 |
.58
#
#
Kurtosis
#
4.49 |
1.12
#
#====================================================#=========#==========#
2.2 EXAMINE. Descriptives
#====================================================#=========#==========#
#
#Statistic|Std. Error#
#====================================================#=========#==========#
#mtbf_ln Mean
#
1.88 |
.19
#
#
95% Confidence Interval for Mean Lower Bound#
1.47 |
#
#
Upper Bound#
2.29 |
#
#
5% Trimmed Mean
#
1.88 |
#
#
Median
#
2.09 |
#
#
Variance
#
.54
|
#
#
Std. Deviation
#
.74
|
#
#
Minimum
#
.49
|
#
#
Maximum
#
3.28 |
#
#
Range
#
2.79 |
#
#
Interquartile Range
#
.92
|
#
#
Skewness
#
-.16 |
.58
#
#
Kurtosis
#
-.09 |
1.12
#
#====================================================#=========#==========#
 
Example 5.5: Testingfor normality using the EXAMINE command and applying a logarith-
mic transformation. The mtbf variable has a large positive skew and is therefore unsuitable
for linear statistical analysis. However the transformed variable (mtbf
ln) is close to normal
and would appear to be more suitable.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested