Economic and Policy Background
13
Figure 7  EU’s direct investment flows to the US, 2004-2011
Source: Eurostat and own calculations.
Investment flows from the US (and from the rest of the world) to the EU also dropped 
dramatically during the crisis (see Figure 8). The highest amount of investment from 
the US took place in 2007, amounting to 195,660 million euros. In 2010, the incoming 
FDI flows were only 114,763 million euros. However, while the volume of FDI inflows 
from the US is still below the pre-crisis level, the share of investment coming from the 
US has reached its pre-crisis level as of 2010. 
Figure 8  EU’s direct investment flows from the US, 2004-2011
Source: Eurostat and own calculations.
Pdf form fill - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
create pdf fill in form; convert pdf file to fillable form online
Pdf form fill - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
converting a word document to a fillable pdf form; convert excel to fillable pdf form
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
14
Given the importance and attractiveness of the North American region for EU investors 
and of the European market for US investors any policy aiming to remove regulatory 
barriers to transatlantic investments can be expected to have a potentially very large 
impact.
2.2.   Current patterns of tariffs
In this section we focus on existing tariff barriers. Figure 9 shows that there is some 
heterogeneity in terms of tariff protections between the EU and the US. While in most 
sectors, EU  tariffs  are slightly  higher than  those imposed  by the US, they are  still 
relatively low. However, there are two main exceptions: motor vehicles, and processed 
foods. The EU average tariffs on these products are substantially higher than the US 
tariffs. For motor vehicles
6
 the EU applies an average tariff (8.0 per cent) that is almost 
eight times higher than the US. For processed food products, EU average tariffs (14.6 
per cent) are more  than four  times higher  than US average  tariffs. For  agriculture, 
forestry and fisheries average tariffs are also relatively high (about 3.7 per cent) but for 
these products there is no difference between the EU and the US. 
Figure 9  Trade Weighted Applied (MFN) average tariff rates 2007
Source: WTO, CEPII, UNCTAD mapped to GTAP8
 Motor vehicles sector in this case includes also parts and components.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
adding a signature to a pdf form; convert pdf to fillable form
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form; convert pdf to fillable pdf form
Economic and Policy Background
15
Given the current tariff structure, the scope for tariff reductions to have a significant 
impact on trade flows is limited. Indeed, for most sectors, a further reduction in tariffs 
implies very small absolute changes in the level of protection. Nevertheless, in some 
sectors, such as processed foods, agriculture, forestry and fisheries, and motor vehicles, 
the impact is likely to be more substantial. For other sectors, NTBs are the primary 
driver of potential impact as will be shown in the next section.
2.3.  Non-tariff barriers
NTBs and regulatory divergence are  complex issues to deal with analytically. Even 
the measurement of  the  importance of  these barriers for  trade  and  investment is  a 
difficult exercise. This study relies on the earlier work on this topic in the Ecorys (2009) 
study. The Ecorys study remains the most comprehensive and detailed to date. The 
methodology incorporated in that study used a multi-pronged approach that combined 
literature reviews, business surveys, econometric analyses (gravity modelling together 
with  CGE  modelling),  as well  as  consultations  with  regulators  and  businesses and 
inputs by sector experts  aiming to obtain a qualitative and quantitative estimates of 
transatlantic NTBs. While the Ecorys survey focused on both trade and FDI, we focus 
here on trade-related barriers.  We will return to FDI barriers in Chapter 6.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
allow users to attach to pdf form; convert word doc to fillable pdf form
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
convert pdf fill form; convert pdf to fillable form online
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
16
2.3.1.  Indexes and econometrics
To estimate the ad-valorem equivalent of NTBs (the impact on prices and costs) and 
to quantify to what extent those are removable between the two economies, the Ecorys 
(2009) study undertook a complex set of assessments. We summarize those steps briefly 
here. The assessment involved surveys combined with gravity-based econometrics.
7
 
 For further discussion on the methodologies used for NTB quantification, which technically are known as gravity models 
see both Ecorys (2009) Chapter 3.4, and also Anderson, Bergstrand, Egger, and Francois (2008).  For goods, selection 
based gravity modelling was used.  Services barriers were based on the NTB elasticity estimates from Francois and 
Hoekman (2010).
Box 1 
NTBS and the concepts of cost and rents
NTBs  and  regulatory differences  can  have  two  main  effects.  NTBs  can  either 
increase the cost of doing business for firms, or they can restrict market access. 
Traditional NTBs, like import quotas, are an example where NTBs market access. 
In  contrast,  regulations that  require  expensive  reconfiguration of  products (like 
changing  voltage  or  reconfiguration  of  an  exhaust  system)  for  export  are  an 
example of cost raising NTBs. Both can have different impacts by changing market 
concentration and economic power (and thus profits) of companies.  In order to 
be able to make a distinction between those two types of NTBs, the concepts of 
‘cost’ and ‘rent’ are included here in modelling of NTBs, following the findings 
of the firm surveys (and related literature) in the Ecorys (2009) study.  That study 
found that about 60 per cent of the price impact of NTBs could be classified as 
following from  actual  cost  increases  on  average,  while  the  creation  of market 
power (economic rent) was responsible for the other 40 per cent of price increases. 
This is an average, and there is some variation across both sectors and countries 
in this regard. In the case of NTB-related cost increases, this constitutes a welfare 
loss to society. In case of an increase in market concentration, consumer prices may 
also go up. However part of the increase is then appropriated by companies as they 
reap increased revenues and profits. Thus there is a redistribution of welfare, and 
not simply a reduction in economic efficiency.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free form. Users can draw freehand annotation on
create fill pdf form; convert word document to pdf fillable form
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free form. Users can draw freehand annotation on
convert pdf form fillable; convert word form to pdf fillable form
Economic and Policy Background
17
The NTB estimates involved a two-part survey as a first step. The survey was conducted 
on firms in the EU and US engaged in trade, and firms in the EU and US engaged 
in FDI. They  were asked  both  detailed questions about NTBs,  and a  more general 
set of questions about overall market access conditions.
8
 In cases where NTBs were 
identified, companies were asked about the relative importance of such barriers. Firms 
also provided  a comprehensive general  measure of NTB-related market  access (the 
combined impact of all barriers) in the form of a ranking scaled from 0 to 100. With 
the overall ranking question, 0 indicated that there were no NTBs of any type, and 
100 meant  there  were  prohibitively high NTBs. The business  survey restrictiveness 
indicators  were  then  crosschecked  against  OECD  (2007)  restrictiveness  indicators 
and against the Product Market  Regulation (PMR)  indexes. For  the service  sectors 
the combination of the OECD restrictiveness indicators and the survey results were 
used. The resulting measures are summarised in Table 1 below.  The firm rankings are 
bilateral (for example an American firm in France might give a different ranking than 
a German firm in France).
The reported NTB rankings (the NTB index) on goods on both sides of the Atlantic are 
generally higher than on services, ranging from 20 per cent to 56 per cent. The highest 
perceived NTB  levels were  found  on  the aerospace  and  space industry. On  goods 
exported to the US, machinery also exhibits  high levels of NTBs, while the lowest 
levels are reported for pharmaceuticals. For goods exported from the US, high levels 
of NTBs were reported for chemicals, cosmetics and biotechnology. Lower levels of 
NTBs were reported for electronics, iron, steel and metal products.
Of course, the firm rankings of general openness are relative. They do not translate into 
actual impacts on costs and prices. For this, the survey data was then integrated with 
a set of econometric models (known as gravity models) to estimate the corresponding 
ad-valorem of percent price impact of the variations in NTB levels. On that basis, the 
 The general ranking questions are reproduced as an annex to this report.  See the annex to the Ecorys (2009) report for 
more information on the more detailed questions.
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
pdf form filler; convert fillable pdf to word fillable form
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Click to open edited file in web browser in PDF form which can be PDF and Word (.docx). with customized style, like setting shape outline, shape fill and shape
create a pdf with fields to fill in; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
18
Ecorys (2009) report also provides price/cost estimates of existing NTBs for traded 
goods and services in a percentage form that can be interpreted similarly to ad-valorem 
tariffs. These estimates are reported in Table 2 below. They reflect the higher prices that 
result because of NTBs.
9
Table 1  Perceived NTB index by business (index between 0-100)
Sector
 EU exports to the US
US exports to the EU
Services Sectors:
Travel
35.6
17.6
Transport
39.9
26.3
Financial Services
29.7
21.3
ICT
20.0
19.3
Insurance
29.5
39.3
Communication
44.6
27.0
Construction
45.0
37.3
Other Business Services
42.2
20.0
Personal, Cultural and 
Recreational Services
35.8
35.4
Goods Sectors:
Chemicals
45.8
53.2
Pharmaceuticals
23.8
44.7
Cosmetics
48.3
52.2
Biotechnology
46.1
50.2
Machinery
50.9
36.5
Electronics
30.8
20.0
Office, Information and 
Communication Equipment
37.9
32.3
Medical, Measuring and 
Testing Appliances
49.3
44.5
Automotive Industry
34.8
31.6
Aerospace and Space Industry
56.0
55.1
Food and Beverages
45.5
33.6
Iron, Steel and Metal Products
35.5
24.0
Textiles, Clothing and 
Footwear
35.6
48.9
Wood and Paper, Paper 
Products
30.0
47.1
Source: Ecorys (2009)
 The reader may note some difference between the sectors in the tables in this section.  We have started in Table 1 with 
the full set of sectors from the original ECORYS survey.  These have been consolidated when we move to sectors for the 
modelling, both in the original ECORYS study and in this report.
Economic and Policy Background
19
According to the estimates in Table 2, non-tariff barriers are the highest for food and 
beverage products, with imports from the US facing a 56.8 per cent tariff equivalent, 
while EU exports to the US of these products face a 73.3 per cent extra cost. Among 
services, financial services are one of the sectors with the highest estimated NTBs. In 
this sector, EU barriers against US exports amount to 11.3 per cent, while US barriers 
against EU exports are estimated to be about 31.7 per cent. Barriers in the services 
sectors are higher on the EU side for the business and ICT sector, communications 
sector, construction, and personal, cultural, other services. On the other hand the US 
barriers for EU exporters in the services sectors are higher than in the EU in the finance 
and insurance sectors. 
It should be stressed that in contrast to reducing tariffs, the removal of NTBs is not as 
straightforward. In fact, it is unlikely that all areas of regulatory divergence identified 
actually can be addressed. As previously pointed out, there are many different sources 
of  NTBs  and  thus  removing  them  may  require  constitutional  changes,  unrealistic 
legislative  changes,  or unrealistic technical  changes.  Removing  NTBs may  also  be 
difficult politically, e.g. because there is a lack of sufficient economic benefit to support 
the effort; because the set of regulations is too broad; because of consumer preferences, 
language  and  geography;  or  due  to  other  political  sensitivities.  In  recognition  of 
these difficulties, in the assumptions of the scenarios, the degree to which an NTB or 
regulatory divergence can, potentially and realistically, be reduced is taken into account 
which is discussed in more details in the following subchapter.
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
20
Table 2  Total trade cost estimates from NTB reduction in per cent, Ecorys (2009)
Sector
Total trade barriers: EU 
barriers against US exports
Total trade barriers: US 
barriers against EU exports
Food and beverages
56.8
73.3
Chemicals
13.6
19.1
Electrical machinery
12.8
14.7
Motor vehicles
25.5
26.8
Other transport equipment
18.8
19.1
Metals and metal products
11.9
17.0
Wood and paper products
11.3
7.7
Other manufactures
N/A
N/A
average goods
21.5
25.4
Transport
Air
2.0
2.0
Water
8.0
8.0
Finance
11.3
31.7
Insurance
10.8
19.1
Business and ICT
14.9
3.9
Communications
11.7
1.7
Construction
4.6
2.5
Personal, cultural, other 
services
4.4
2.5
average services
8.5
8.9
Source: Ecorys (2009), Annex Table III.1
At this stage, there are patterns in Table 2 that will carry forward in the modelling. 
Following from the Ecorys (2009) study, businesses perceived transatlantic NTBs as 
substantially lower for services than for goods. This means that, for comparable cuts 
in barriers in per cent terms, the differences in barriers (combined with the absolute 
importance in goods trade relative to services trade) imply that we can expect greater 
impact from NTB reductions in goods than in services.
21
The purpose of this chapter is to present and discuss the model used as basis for the 
policy experiments, including the sector and regional aggregation that were used. 
In this report, the economic assessment of a trade agreement between the EU and US 
is based on a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of global world trade. The 
CGE modelling exercise is meant to estimate the effects on the EU and US economies. 
CGE models like the ones used here help answer what-if questions by simulating the 
price, income and substitution effects in market equilibrium under different assumptions 
about changes in policy. The economic outcomes of the “baseline” scenario (with no 
policy  change)  can  be  compared to  the  different  scenario associated  with changes 
in trade policy. The “baseline” for the model is thus the equilibrium without policy 
change, and the ‘scenario’ is the equilibrium after the policy change. The effect of the 
policy change can then be benchmarked by the difference between the two.
3.1.  The model 
The CGE model employed is based on the widely used GTAP model (Hertel, 1997), 
with added features from the Francois, van Meijl, and  van Tongeren (2005) model. 
More technical details of the model are provided in the annex. 
The most important aspects of the model can be summarised as follows:
•  It covers global world trade and production
•  It allows for scale economies and imperfect competition
3.  Technical Discussion on CGE 
Modelling Set Up  
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
22
•  It includes intermediate linkages between sectors
•  It allows for trade to impact on capital stocks through investment effects which 
allows to obtain longer-run impact on the economy 
Imperfect competition in the Francois, van Meijl, and van Tongeren (2005) model, as 
implemented here, is explained in Francois, Manchin, and Martin (2012). It involves 
firm  level competition  and  supply  of  varieties  of  goods  and services  to  both  final 
consumers and downstream firms under what is known as monopolistic competition. 
The modelling of investment effects is based on Francois and McDonald (1996). This 
does not involve gross foreign direct investment flows, but rather changes in regional 
and global capital stocks (machinery and equipment) as a result of changes in levels of 
savings and investment.
Box 2 
Key features of the model
Model simulations are based on a multi-region, multi-sector global CGE model. 
Sectors are linked through intermediate input coefficients (based on national social 
accounts data) as well as competition in primary factor markets. The model includes 
imperfect competition, short-run and long-run macroeconomic closure options, as 
well as the standard static, perfect competition, Armington-type set-up as a subset. 
On the policy side, it offers the option to implement tariff reductions, export tax 
and subsidy reduction, trade quota expansion, input subsidies, output subsidies, 
and reductions in trade costs. International trade costs include shipping and logistic 
services (the source of fob-cif margins), but can also be modelled as Samuelson-
type deadweight costs. This can be used to capture higher costs when producing for 
export markets, due to regulatory barriers or NTBs that do not generate rents (or 
where the rents are dissipated through rent-seeking). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested