c# pdf to image without ghostscript : Change font pdf fillable form control software platform web page winforms asp.net web browser wbook20-part61

CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
190
models a practitioner would need to devote considerable eort to testing
and specifying the functional form and variables involved in the model for
var("
i
). Assuming success in nding a few candidate specications, there is
stillthe problem of inferences that may vary across alternative specications
for the non-constant variance.
We rely on Gibbs sampling to estimate the spatial logit/probit and tobit
models. During sampling, we introduce a conditional distribution for the
censored or latent observations conditional on all other parameters in the
model. This distributionis usedto produce a random drawfor each censored
value of y
i
in the case of tobit and for all y
i
in the probit model. The
conditional distribution for the latent variables takes the form of a normal
distribution centered on the predicted value truncated at the right by 0 in
the case of tobit, and truncated by 0 from the left and right in the case of
probit, for y
i
=1 and y
i
=0 respectively.
An important dierence between the EM approach and the sampling-
based approach set forth here is the proof outlined by Gelfand and Smith
(1990) that Gibbs sampling from the sequence of complete conditional dis-
tributions for all parameters in the model produces a set of draws that
converge in the limit to the true (joint) posterior distribution of the param-
eters. Because of this, we overcome the bias inherent in the EM algorithm's
use of conditional distributions. Valid measures of dispersion for all param-
eters in the model can be constructed from the large sample of parameter
draws produced by the Gibbs sampler. Further, if one is interested in linear
or non-linear functions of the parameters, these can be constructed using
the underlying parameter draws in the linear or non-linear function and
then computing the mean over all draws. A valid measure of dispersion for
this linear or non-linear combination of the parameters can be based on the
distribution of the functional combination of parameters.
The Gibbs sampling approach to estimating the spatial autoregressive
models presented in Chapter 3 can be adapted to produce probit and to-
bit estimates by adding a single conditional distribution for the censored or
latent observations. Intuitively, once wehavea samplefor the unobserved la-
tent dependent variables, the problem reduces to the Bayesian heteroscedas-
tic spatial autoregressive models presented in Chapter3. The conditional
distributions for all other parameters in spatial autoregressive model pre-
sented in Chapter3 remain valid.
Another important advantage of the method proposed here is that het-
eroscedasticity and outliers can be easily accommodated with the use of the
methods outlined in Chapter 3. For the case of the probit model, an in-
teresting interpretation can be given to the family of t−distributions that
Change font pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf fill form; attach file to pdf form
Change font pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
pdf form fill; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
191
arise from the methods in Chapter3 to deal with spatial heterogeneity and
spatial outliers. Recall that models involving binary data can rely on any
continuous probability function as the probability rule linking tted prob-
abilities with the binary observations. Probit models arise from a normal
probability rule and logit models from a logistic probability rule. When
one introduces the latent variables z
i
in the probit model to reflect unob-
served values based on the binary dependent variables y
i
,we have an un-
derlying conditional regression involving z and the usual spatial regression
model variables X;W, where X represents the explanatory variables and
W denotes the row-standardized spatialweight matrix. The heteroscedastic
spatial autoregressive model introduced in Chapter3 can be viewed in the
case of binary dependent variables as a probability rule based on a family
of t−distributions that represent a mixture of the underlying normal dis-
tribution used in the probit regression. (It is well known that the normal
distribution can be modeled as a mixture of t−distributions, see Albert and
Chib, 1993).
The most popular choice of probability rule to relate tted probabilities
with binary data is the logit function corresponding to a logisticdistribution
for the cumulative density function. Albert and Chib (1993) show that the
quantiles of the logistic distribution correspond to a t-distribution around
7or 8 degrees of freedom. We also know that the normal probability den-
sity is similar to a t−distribution when the degrees of freedom are large.
This allows us to view both the probit and logit models as special cases of
the family of models introduced here using a chi-squared prior based on a
hyperparameter specifying alternative degrees of freedom to model spatial
heterogeneity and outliers.
By using alternative values for the prior hyperparameter that we labeled
r in Chapter 3, one can test the sensitivity of the tted probabilities to
alternative distributional choices for the regression model. For example, if
we rely on a value of r near 7 or 8, the estimates resulting from the Bayesian
version of the heteroscedastic probit model correspond to those one would
achieve using a logit model. On the other hand, using a large degrees of
freedom parameter, say r = 50 would lead to estimates that produce tted
probabilities based on the probit model choice of a normal probability rule.
The implication of this is that the heteroscedastic spatial probit model we
introduce here represents a more general model than either probit or logit.
The generality derives from the family of t−distributions associated with
alternative values of the hyperparameter r in the model.
Anal advantage of the method described here is that estimates of the
non-constant variance for each point in space are provided and the prac-
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
auto fill pdf form fields; create a pdf form that can be filled out
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
framework. Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box.
convert word to pdf fillable form online; add fillable fields to pdf
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
192
titioner need not specify a functional form for the non-constant variance.
Spatial outliers or aberrant observations as well as patterns of spatial het-
erogeneity will be identied in the normal course of estimation. This repre-
sents a considerable improvement over the approach described by McMillen
(1992), where a separate model for the non-constant variance needs to be
specied.
5.2 The Gibbs sampler
For spatial autoregressive models with uncensored y observations where the
error process is homoscedastic and outliers are absent, the computational
intensity of the Gibbs sampler is a decided disadvantage over maximumlike-
lihood methods. As demonstrated in Chapter3, the estimates produced by
the Bayesian model estimated with Gibbs sampling are equivalent to those
from maximum likelihood in these cases. For the case of probit and tobit
models, the Gibbs sampler might be very competitive to the EM algorithm
presented in McMillen (1992) because numerous probit or tobit maximum
likelihood problems need to be solved to implement the EM method.
Before turning attention to the heteroscedastic version of the Bayesian
spatial autoregressive logit/probit and tobit models, consider the case of
a homoscedastic spatial autoregressive tobit model where the observed y
variable is censored. One can view this model in terms of a latent but unob-
servable variable z such that values of z
i
<0, produce an observed variable
y
i
= 0. Similarly, spatial autoregressive probit models can be associated
with a latent variable z
i
<0 that produces an observed variable y
i
=0 and
z
i
0 resulting in y
i
=1. In both these models, the posterior distribution
of z conditional on all other parameters takes the form of truncated normal
distribution (see Chib, 1992 and Albert and Chib, 1993).
For the spatial tobit model, the conditional distribution of z
i
given all
other parameters is a truncated normal distribution constructed by trun-
cating a N[~y
i
;
2
ti
]distribution from the right by zero. Where the predicted
value for z
i
is denoted by ~y
i
which represents the ith row of ~y = B
−1
X for
the SAR modelandthe ith row of ~y = X for the SEM model. The variance
of the prediction is 
2
ti
=
2
"
P
j
!
2
ij
,where !
ij
denotes the ijth element of
(I
n
−W)
−1
"for both the SAR and SEM models. The pdf of the latent
variables z
i
is then:
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; change font size in pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
create a fillable pdf form in word; add fillable fields to pdf online
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
193
f(z
i
j;;) =
(
[1 −(~y
i
=
ti
)]
−1
exp[−(z
i
−~y
i
)
2
=2
it
]; if z
i
0
0
if z
i
>0
(5.5)
Similarly, for the case of probit, the conditional distribution of z
i
given
all other parameters is:
f(z
i
j;;) 
(
N(~y
i
;
2
pi
); truncated at the left by 0 if y
i
=1
N(~y
i
;
2
pi
); truncated at the right by 0 if y
i
=0
(5.6)
Where 
2
pi
=
P
j
!
2
ij
,because the probit model is unable to identify both 
and 
2
"
,leading us to scale our problem so 
2
"
equals unity. The predicted
value ~y
i
takes the same form for the SAR and SEM models as described
above for the case of tobit.
The tobit expression (5.5) indicates that we rely on the actual observed
yvalues for non-censored observations and use the sampled latent variables
for the unobserved values of y. For the case of the probit model, we replace
values of y
i
=1 with the sampled normals truncated at the left by 0 and
values of y
i
=0 with sampled normals truncated at the right by 0.
Given these sampled continuous variables from the conditional distri-
bution of z
i
,we can implement the remaining steps of the Gibbs sampler
described in Chapter3 to determine draws from the conditional distribu-
tions for ; ( and  in the case of tobit) using the sampled z
i
values in
place of the censored variables y
i
.
5.3 Heteroscedastic models
The models described in this section can be expressed in the form shown
in (5.5), where we relax the usual assumption of homogeneity for the dis-
turbances used in SAR, SEM and SAC modeling. Given the discussion in
Section5.2, we can initially assume the existence of non-censored obser-
vations on the dependent variable y because these can be replaced with
sampled values z as motivated in the previous section.
y = W
1
y+ X + u
(5.7)
u = W
2
u+"
"  N(0;
2
V);
V = diag(v
1
;v
2
;:::;v
n
)
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
pdf fillable forms; allow users to attach to pdf form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable C#.NET Project DLLs: Conversion from OpenOffice to PDF in C#.NET. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
change font size pdf fillable form; pdf fill form
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
194
Where v
i
;i = 1;:::;n represent a set of relative variance parameters to be
estimated. We restrict the spatial lag parameters to the interval 1=
min
<
; < 1=
max
.
It should be clear that we need only add one additional step to the
Gibbs sampler developed in Chapter3 for Bayesian heteroscedastic spatial
autoregressive models. The additional step will provide truncated draws for
the censored or limited dependent variables.
The above reasoning suggest the following Gibbs sampler. Begin with
arbitrary values for the parameters 
0
;
0
;
0
and v
0
i
, which we designate
with the superscript 0. (Keep in mind that we do not sample the conditional
distribution for  in the case of the probit model where this parameter is
set to unity.)
1. Calculate p(j
0
;
0
;v
0
i
), which we use along with a random 
2
(n)
draw to determine 
1
.
2. Calculate p(j
0
;
1
v
0
i
) using 
1
from the previous step. Given the
means and variance-covariance structure for , we carry out a multi-
variate random draw based on this mean and variance to determine
1
.
3. Calculate p(v
i
j
0
;
1
1
), which is based on an n−vector of random
2
(r +1) draws to determine v
1
i
;i = 1;:::;n.
4. Use metropolis within Gibbs sampling to determine 
1
as explained in
Chapter3, using the the values 
1
;
1
and v
1
i
;i = 1;:::;n determined
in the previous steps.
5. Sample the censored y
i
observations from a truncated normal centered
onthe predictive mean and variance determined using 
1
;
1
;
1
;v
1
i
(as
described in Section5.2) for the probit and tobit models.
In the above development of the Gibbs sampler we assumed the hyper-
parameter r that determines the extent to which the disturbances take on a
leptokurtic character was known. It is unlikely in practice that investigators
would have knowledge regarding this parameter, so an issue that confronts
us when attempting to implement the heteroscedastic model is setting the
hyperparameter r. As already discussed in Chapter3, I suggest using a small
value near r = 4, which produces estimates close to those based on a logit
probability rule. If you wish to examine the sensitivity of your inferences
to use of a logit versus probit probability rule, you can produce estimates
based on a larger value of r = 30 for comparison.
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; c# fill out pdf form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
convert html form to pdf fillable form; convert pdf to fillable form online
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
195
5.4 Implementing these models
We have functions sarp
gand sart
gthat carry out Gibbs sampling esti-
mation of the probit and tobit spatialautoregressive models. The documen-
tation for sarp
gis:
PURPOSE: Gibbs sampling spatial autoregressive Probit model
y = p*Wy + Xb + e, e is N(0,sige*V)
y is a 0,1 vector
V = diag(v1,v2,...vn), r/vi = ID chi(r)/r, r = Gamma(m,k)
B = N(c,T), sige = gamma(nu,d0), p = diffuse prior
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: results = sarp_g(y,x,W,ndraw,nomit,prior,start)
where: y = dependent variable vector (nobs x 1)
x = independent variables matrix (nobs x nvar)
W = 1st order contiguity matrix (standardized, row-sums = 1)
ndraw = # of draws
nomit = # of initial draws omitted for burn-in
prior = a structure for: B = N(c,T), sige = gamma(nu,d0)
prior.beta, prior means for beta,
c above (default 0)
prior.bcov, prior beta covariance , T above (default 1e+12)
prior.rval, r prior hyperparameter, default=4
prior.m,
informative Gamma(m,k) prior on r
prior.k,
(default: not used)
prior.nu,
a prior parameter for sige
prior.d0,
(default: diffuse prior for sige)
prior.rmin = (optional) min rho used in sampling
prior.rmax = (optional) max rho used in sampling
start = (optional) structure containing starting values:
defaults: beta=1,sige=1,rho=0.5, V= ones(n,1)
start.b
= beta starting values (nvar x 1)
start.p
= rho starting value
(scalar)
start.sig = sige starting value (scalar)
start.V
= V starting values (n x 1)
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure:
results.meth = 'sarp_g'
results.bdraw = bhat draws (ndraw-nomit x nvar)
results.sdraw = sige draws (ndraw-nomit x 1)
results.vmean = mean of vi draws (1 x nobs)
results.ymean = mean of y draws (1 x nobs)
results.rdraw = r draws (ndraw-nomit x 1) (if m,k input)
results.pdraw = p draws
(ndraw-nomit x 1)
results.pmean = b prior means, prior.beta from input
results.pstd = b prior std deviations sqrt(diag(T))
results.r
= value of hyperparameter r (if input)
results.r2mf = McFadden R-squared
results.rsqr = Estrella R-squared
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
add fillable fields to pdf online; create fillable form pdf online
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
change font in pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form online
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
196
results.nobs = # of observations
results.nvar = # of variables in x-matrix
results.zip
= # of zero y-values
results.ndraw = # of draws
results.nomit = # of initial draws omitted
results.y
= actual observations (nobs x 1)
results.yhat = predicted values
results.nu
= nu prior parameter
results.d0
= d0 prior parameter
results.time = time taken for sampling
results.accept= acceptance rate
results.rmax = 1/max eigenvalue of W (or rmax if input)
results.rmin = 1/min eigenvalue of W (or rmin if input)
This functiondocumentationand useis very similartothe sar
gfunction
from Chapter3. One dierence is in the measures of t calculated. These
are R−squared measures that are traditionally used for limited dependent
variable models.
Followingan example provided by McMillen (1992) for his EM algorithm
approach to estimating SAR and SEM probit models, we employ the data
set from Anselin (1988) on crime in Columbus, Ohio. McMillen censored the
dependent variable oncrime such that y
i
=1 for values of crime greater than
40 and y
i
=0 for values of crime less than or equal to 40. The explanatory
variables in the model are neighborhood housing values and neighborhood
income. Example 5.1 demonstrates how to implement a spatial probit model
Gibbs sampler using the probit
gfunction.
% ----- Example 5.1 SAR Probit Model
load anselin.data;
y = anselin(:,1); [n junk] = size(y);
x = [ones(n,1) anselin(:,2:3)];
vnames = strvcat('crime','constant','income','hvalue');
load Wmat.data; W = Wmat;
yc = zeros(n,1);
% now convert the data to 0,1 values
for i=1:n
if y(i,1) > 40.0
yc(i,1) = 1;
end;
end;
ndraw = 1100; nomit = 100;
prior.rval = 4; prior.rmin = 0; prior.rmax = 1;
result = sarp_g(yc,x,W,ndraw,nomit,prior);
prt(result,vnames);
plt(result,vnames);
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
197
The printed results are shown below and the graphical results provided
by the plt function are shown inFigure5.1. For comparison we also present
the results from ignoring the limited dependent variable nature of the y
variable in this model and using the sar function to produce maximum
likelihood estimates.
Gibbs sampling spatial autoregressive Probit model
Dependent Variable =
crime
McFadden R^2
=
0.4122
Estrella R^2
=
0.5082
sigma^2
=
2.4771
r-value
=
4
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
# 0, 1 y-values =
30,
19
ndraws,nomit
=
1100,
100
acceptance rate =
0.7836
time in secs
=
69.0622
min and max rho =
0.0000,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Prior Mean
Std Deviation
constant
0.000000
1000000.000000
income
0.000000
1000000.000000
hvalue
0.000000
1000000.000000
***************************************************************
Posterior Estimates
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
constant
3.616236
2.408302
0.020092
income
-0.197988
-1.698013
0.096261
hvalue
-0.036941
-1.428174
0.159996
rho
0.322851
2.200875
0.032803
Spatial autoregressive Model Estimates
R-squared
=
0.5216
Rbar-squared
=
0.5008
sigma^2
=
0.1136
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
log-likelihood =
-1.1890467
# of iterations =
13
min and max rho =
-1.5362,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
variable 1
0.679810
2.930130
0.005259
variable 2
-0.019912
-1.779421
0.081778
variable 3
-0.005525
-1.804313
0.077732
rho
0.539201
2.193862
0.033336
Gibbs sampling spatial autoregressive Probit model
Dependent Variable =
crime
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
198
McFadden R^2
=
0.3706
Estrella R^2
=
0.4611
sigma^2
=
2.2429
r-value
=
40
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
# 0, 1 y-values =
30,
19
ndraws,nomit
=
1100,
100
acceptance rate =
0.9616
time in secs
=
70.3423
min and max rho =
0.0000,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Prior Mean
Std Deviation
constant
0.000000
1000000.000000
income
0.000000
1000000.000000
hvalue
0.000000
1000000.000000
***************************************************************
Posterior Estimates
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
constant
4.976554
2.408581
0.020078
income
-0.259836
-2.047436
0.046351
hvalue
-0.053615
-1.983686
0.053278
rho
0.411042
3.285293
0.001954
There is a remarkable dierence between the maximum likelihood esti-
mates that ignore the limited dependent nature of the variable y which we
would expect. To explore the dierence between `logit' and `probit' esti-
mates, we produced a set of Bayesian estimates based on a hyperparameter
value of r = 40, which would correspond to the Probit model. Green (1997)
states that the issue of which distributional form should be used on applied
econometric problems is unresolved. He further indicates that inferences
from either logit or probit models are often the same. This does not appear
to be the case for the data set in example 5.1, where we see a dierence
in both the magnitude and signicance of the parameters from the models
based on r = 4 and r = 40.
Analpoint withrespect tointerpretingthe estimatesis that the marginal
impacts of the variables on the tted probabilities is usually the inference
aim of these models. The estimates would need to be converted according
to the probability rule implied by the alternativeunderlying t−distributions
associated with the r value employed. These marginal impacts would be
very similar (as in the case of non-spatial maximum likelihood logit versus
probit marginalimpacts) despite the apparent dierences in the coecients.
For the purpose of computing marginal impacts, one needs to evaluate the
posterior density of p
k
,which we denote ^(p
k
)for k ranging over all sample
observations. (It is conventional to assess marginal impacts across all obser-
CHAPTER 5. LIMITED DEPENDENT VARIABLE MODELS
199
10
20
30
40
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
SAR Probit Gibbs   Actual vs. Predicted
0
10
20
30
40
50
-1
-0.5
0
0.5
1
Residuals
0
10
20
30
40
50
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
2
Mean of V
i
draws
0
0.5
1
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Posterior Density for rho
Figure 5.1: Results of plt() function
vations in the model and then average these.) For the heteroscedastic model
p
k
will take the form: (~y
k
)= (W
k
v
(−1=2)
k
y+ v
(−1=2)
k
x
0
k
). To nd the
posterior density estimate of ^(p
k
)we would employ the draws for 
i
;v
i
k
;
i
in normal densities, denoted N(;) as indicated in (5.8)
^(p
k
) = (1=m)
m
X
i=1
N[~y
i
k
;(1=v
i
k
)x
0
k
(X
0
V
−1
i
X)
−1
x
k
]=N[0;1] (5.8)
~y
i
k
= 
i
W
k
(1=
q
v
i
k
)y + (1=
q
v
i
k
)x
0
k
i
V
−1
i
= diag(1=v
i
j
);j = 1;:::;n
Table5.1 shows a comparison of McMillen's EM algorithm estimates and
those from Gibbs sampling. The Gibbs estimates are based on 1,100 draws
with the rst 100 discarded for startup or burn-in. Gibbs SAR and SEM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested