c# pdf to image pdfsharp : Convert word to pdf fillable form online Library SDK API .net wpf windows sharepoint wbook9-part75

CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
80
[W1 W W3] = xy2cont(latitude,longitude); % create W-matrix
[n k] = size(boston);y = boston(:,k);
% median house values
x = boston(:,1:k-1);
% other variables
vnames = strvcat('hprice','crime','zoning','industry','charlesr', ...
'noxsq','rooms2','houseage','distance','access','taxrate', ...
'pupil/teacher','blackpop','lowclass');
ys = studentize(log(y)); xs = studentize(x);
rmin = 0; rmax = 1;
W2 = W*W;
res = sac(ys,xs,W,W2); prt(res,vnames);
res2 = sac(ys,xs,W,W);
resid = res2.resid; % recover SAC residuals
prt(far(resid,W2,rmin,rmax));
The results shown below indicate that the SAC model using a second-
order spatial weight matrix produces a slightly lower likelihood function
value thanthe SAC model inexample 2.13,but estimates that arereasonably
similar in all other regards.
General Spatial Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
hprice
R-squared
=
0.8766
Rbar-squared
=
0.8736
sigma^2
=
0.1231
log-likelihood =
-56.71359
Nobs, Nvars
=
506,
13
# iterations
=
7
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
crime
-0.195223
-8.939992
0.000000
zoning
0.085436
2.863017
0.004375
industry
0.018200
0.401430
0.688278
charlesr
-0.008227
-0.399172
0.689939
noxsq
-0.190621
-3.405129
0.000715
rooms2
0.204352
8.727857
0.000000
houseage
-0.056388
-1.551836
0.121343
distance
-0.287894
-5.007506
0.000001
access
0.332325
5.486948
0.000000
taxrate
-0.245156
-4.439223
0.000011
pupil/teacher
-0.109542
-3.609570
0.000338
blackpop
0.127546
4.896422
0.000001
lowclass
-0.363506
-10.368125
0.000000
rho
0.684424
12.793448
0.000000
lambda
0.208597
2.343469
0.019502
First-order spatial autoregressive model Estimates
R-squared
=
0.0670
sigma^2
=
0.1245
Convert word to pdf fillable form online - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; pdf form fill
Convert word to pdf fillable form online - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert word to pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
81
Nobs, Nvars
=
506,
1
log-likelihood =
-827.5289
# of iterations =
9
min and max rho =
0.0000,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
rho
0.188278
1.420560
0.156062
The residuals from the SAC model in example 2.13 show no signicant
second-order spatial autocorrelation, since the FAR model estimate is not
statistically signicant.
Tofurther explore this modelas an exercise,youmight consider replacing
the W2 weight matrix in example 2.14 with a matrix based on distances.
See if this variant of the SAC model is successful. Another exercise would be
to estimate a model using: sac(ys,xs,W2,W), and compare it to the model
in example 2.14.
2.6 Chapter Summary
We have seen that spatial autoregressive models can be estimated using
univariate and bivariate optimization algorithms to solve for estimates by
maximizing the likelihoodfunction. The sparse matrix routines in MATLAB
allow us to write functions that evaluate the log likelihood function for
large models rapidly and with a minimum of computer RAM memory. This
approach was used to construct a library of estimation functions that were
illustrated on a problem involving all 3,107 counties in the continental U.S.
on an inexpensive desktop computer.
In addition to providing functions that estimate these models, the use of
ageneral software design allowed us to provide both printed and graphical
presentation of the estimation results.
Another place where we produced functions that can be used in spatial
econometric analysis was in the area of testing for spatial dependence in
the residuals from least-squares models and SAR models. Functions were
devised to implement Moran's I−statistic as well as likelihood ratio and
Lagrange multiplier tests for spatial autocorrelation in the residuals from
least-squares and SAR models. These tests are a bit more hampered by
large-scale data sets, but alternative approaches based on using the FAR
model on residuals or likelihood ratio tests can be used.
2.7 References
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
auto fill pdf form fields; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
c# fill out pdf form; create fillable pdf form from word
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
82
Anselin,L. 1980. EstimationMethods forSpatialAutoregressiveStruc-
tures, (New York: Regional Science Dissertation and Monograph Se-
ries 8).
Anselin, L. 1988. Spatial Econometrics: Methods and Models, (Dord-
drecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers).
Anselin, L. and D.A. Grith. 1988. \Do spatial eects really matter
in regression analysis? Papers of the Regional Science Association,65,
pp. 11-34.
Anselin, L. and R.J.G. Florax. 1994. \Small Sample Properties of
Tests for Spatial Dependence in Regression Models: Some Further
Results", Research paper 9414, Regional Research Institute, West Vir-
ginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia.
Anselin, L. and S. Rey. 1991. \Properties of tests for spatial depen-
dence in linear regressionmodels", Geographical Analysis, Volume 23,
pages 112-31.
Belsley, D. A., E. Kuh, and R. E. Welsch. 1980. Regression Diag-
nostics: Identifying Influential Data and Source of Collinearity, (John
Wiley: New York).
Cli, A. and J. Ord, 1972. \Testing for spatial autocorrelation among
regression residuals", Geographical Analysis, Vol. 4, pp. 267-84.
Cli, A. and J. Ord, 1973. Spatial Autocorrelation, (London: Pion)
Cli,A.andJ. Ord, 1981. SpatialProcesses, Models andApplications,
(London: Pion)
Gilley, O.W., and R. Kelley Pace. 1996. \On the Harrison and Ru-
binfeld Data," Journal of EnvironmentalEconomics and Management,
Vol. 31 pp. 403-405.
Pace, R. K. and R. Barry. 1997. \Quick Computation of Spatial
Autoregressive Estimators", forthcoming in Geographical Analysis.
Pace, R. Kelley. 1993. \Nonparametric Methods with Applications to
Hedonic Models," Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics Vol.
7, pp. 185-204.
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert pdf to fillable form; convert fillable pdf to html form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
convert word form to fillable pdf form; convert word document to fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
83
Pace, R. Kelley, and O.W. Gilley. 1997. \Using the Spatial Congu-
rationof the Data to Improve Estimation,"Journal of the Real Estate
Finance and Economics Vol. 14 pp. 333-340.
Pace, R. Kelley, and R. Barry. 1998. \Simulating mixed regressive
spatiallyautoregressiveestimators,"ComputationalStatistics,Vol. 13
pp. 397-418.
Ripley, Brian D. 1988. Statistical Inference for Spatial Processes,
(Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, U.K.).
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. Export PDF from OpenOffice Spreadsheet data. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.Word.dll.
convert word to fillable pdf form; attach file to pdf form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual An excellent .NET control support convert PDF to multiple Evaluation library and components for PDF creation from
best pdf form filler; convert html form to pdf fillable form
Chapter 3
Bayesian Spatial
autoregressive models
This chapter discusses spatial autoregressive models from a Bayesian per-
spective. It is well-known that Bayesian regression methods implemented
with diuse prior information can replicate maximum likelihood estimation
results. We demonstrate this type of application, but focus on some exten-
sions that are available with the Bayesian approach. The maximum likeli-
hood estimation methods set forth in the previous chapter are based on the
presumption that the underlying disturbance process involved in generating
the model is normally distributed.
Further, many of the formal tests for spatial dependence and heterogene-
ity including those introduced in the previous chapter rely on characteristics
of quadratic forms for normal variates in order to derive the asymptotic dis-
tribution of the test statistics.
There is a history of Bayesian literature that deals with heteroscedas-
tic and leptokurtic disturbances, treating these two phenomena in a similar
fashion. Geweke (1993) points out that a non-Bayesian regression method-
ology introduced by Lange, Little and Taylor (1989), which assume an inde-
pendent Student-t distribution for the regression disturbances, is identical
to a Bayesian heteroscedastic linear regression model he introduces. Lange,
Little and Taylor (1989) show that their regression model provides robust
results in a wide range of applied data settings.
Geweke (1993) argues the samefor his method and makes a connection to
the Bayesian treatment of symmetric leptokurtic disturbance distributions
through the use of scale mixtures of normal distributions. We adopt the
approach of Geweke (1993) in order to extend the spatial autoregressive
84
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create fillable PDF document with fields. Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins.
auto fill pdf form from excel; convert pdf to form fillable
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application.
convert word form to pdf with fillable; add signature field to pdf
CHAPTER 3. BAYESIAN SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS 85
models introduced in Chapter2.
The extended version of the model is:
y = W
1
y+ X + u
(3.1)
u = W
2
u+"
"  N(0;
2
V)
V = diag(v
1
;v
2
;:::;v
n
)
Where the change made to the basic model is in the assumption regarding
the disturbances ". We assume that they exhibit non-constant variance,
taking on dierent values for every observation. The magnitudes v
i
;i =
1;:::::;n represent parameters tobe estimated. This assumption of inherent
spatial heterogeneity seems more appropriate than the traditional Gauss-
Markov assumption that the variance of the disturbance terms is constant
over space.
The rst section of this chapter introduces a Bayesian heteroscedastic
regression model and the topic of Gibbs sampling estimation without com-
plications introduced by the spatial autoregressive model. The next section
applies these ideas to the simple FAR model and implements a Gibbs sam-
pling estimation procedure for this model. Following sections deal with the
other spatial autoregressive models that we introduced in the previous chap-
ter.
3.1 The Bayesian regression model
We consider the case of a heteroscedastic linear regression model with an
informative prior that can be written as in (3.2).
y = X + "
(3.2)
"  N(0;
2
V)
V = diag(v
1
;v
2
;:::;v
n
)
  N(c;T)
  (1=)
r=v
i
 ID 
2
(r)=r
r 
Γ(m;k)
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Free online C# source codes provide best ways to create PDF forms and delete PDF A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; create a fillable pdf form in word
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; using RasterEdge.XDoc.Excel; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint; How to VB.NET: Convert ODT to PDF.
change font size in fillable pdf form; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 3. BAYESIAN SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS 86
Where y is an nx1 vector of dependent variables and X represents the nxk
matrix of explanatory variables. We assume that " is an nx1 vector of nor-
mally distributed random variates with non-constant variance. We place
anormal prior on the parameters  and a diuse prior on . The rela-
tive variance terms (v
1
;v
2
;:::;v
n
), are assumed xed but unknown param-
eters that need to be estimated. The thought of estimating n parameters,
v
1
;v
2
;:::;v
n
,in addition to the k+1 parameters, ; using n data obser-
vations seems problematical. Bayesian methods don't encounter the same
degrees of freedom constraints, because we can rely on an informative prior
for these parameters. This prior distribution for the v
i
terms will take the
form of an independent 
2
(r)=r distribution. Recall that the 
2
distribution
is a single parameter distribution,where we have represented this parameter
as r. This allows us to estimate the additional n v
i
parameters in the model
by adding the single parameter r to our estimation procedure.
This type of prior has been used by Lindley (1971) for cell variances
in an analysis of variance problem, and Geweke (1993) in modeling het-
eroscedasticity and outliers. The specics regarding the prior assigned to
the v
i
terms can be motivated by considering that the prior mean equals
unity and the variance of the prior is 2=r. This implies that as r becomes
very large, the terms v
i
will all approach unity, resulting in V = I
n
, the
traditional Gauss-Markov assumption. We will see that the role of V 6= I
n
is to robustify against outliers and observations containing large variances
by downweighting these observations. Large r values are associated with a
prior belief that outliers and non-constant variances do not exist.
Now consider the posterior distribution from which we would derive our
estimates. Following the usual Bayesian methodology, we would combine
the likelihood function for our simple model with the prior distributions
for ,  and V to arrive at the posterior. There is little use in doing this
as we produce a complicated function that is not amenable to analysis. As
an alternative,consider the conditional distributions for the parameters ;
and V . These distributions are those that would arise fromassuming each of
the other parameters were known. For example, the conditionaldistribution
for  assuming that we knew  and V would looks as follows:
j(;V)  N[H(X
0
V
−1
y+ 
2
R
0
T
−1
c) ; 
2
H]:
(3.3)
H
= (X
0
V
−1
X+ R
0
T
−1
R)
−1
Note that this is quite analogous to a generalized least-squares (GLS) ver-
sion of the Theil and Goldberger (1961) estimation formulas, known as the
CHAPTER 3. BAYESIAN SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS 87
\mixed estimator". Consider also that this would be fast and easy to com-
pute.
Next consider the conditional distribution for the parameter  assuming
that we knew the parameters  and V in the problem. This distribution
would be:
[
n
X
i=1
(e
2
i
=v
i
)=
2
]j(;V )  
2
(n)
(3.4)
Where we let e
i
=y
i
−x
0
i
. This result parallels the simple regression case
where we know that the residuals are 
2
distributed. A dierence from the
standard case is that we adjust the e
i
using the relative variance terms v
i
.
Finally, the conditional distribution for the parameters V represent a 
2
distribution with r + 1 degrees of freedom (see Geweke, 1993):
[(
−2
e
2
i
+r)=v
i
]j(;)  
2
(r + 1)
(3.5)
The Gibbs sampler provides a way to sample from a multivariate poste-
rior probability density of the type we encounter in this estimation problem
based only on the densities of subsets of vectors conditional on allothers. In
other words, we can use the conditional distributions set forth above to pro-
duce estimates for our model, despite the fact that the posterior distribution
was not tractable.
The Gibbs sampling approach that we will use throughout this chapter
to estimate Bayesian variants of the spatial autoregressive models is based
on this simple idea. We specify the conditional distributions for all of the
parameters in the model and proceed to carry out random draws from these
distributions until we collect a large sample of parameter draws. Gelfand
and Smith (1990) demonstrate that Gibbs sampling from the sequence of
complete conditional distributions for all parameters in the model produces
aset of draws that converge inthe limit to the true (joint) posterior distribu-
tion of the parameters. That is, despite the use of conditional distributions
in our sampling scheme, a large sample of the draws can be used to produce
valid posterior inferences about the mean and moments of the multivariate
posterior parameter distribution.
The method is most easily described by developing and implementing a
Gibbs sampler for our heteroscedastic Bayesian regression model. Given the
three conditionalposterior densities in (3.3) through (3.5), we can formulate
aGibbs sampler for this model using the following steps:
1. Begin with arbitrary values for the parameters 
0
;
0
and v
0
i
which we
designate with the superscript 0.
CHAPTER 3. BAYESIAN SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS 88
2. Compute the mean and variance of  using (3.3) conditional on the
initial values 
0
and v
0
i
.
3. Use the computed mean and variance of  to draw a multivariate
normal random vector, which we label 
1
.
4. Calculate expression (3.4) using 
1
determined in step 3 and use this
value along with a random 
2
(n) draw to determine 
1
.
5. Using 
1
and 
1
,calculate expression (3.5) and use the value along
with an n−vector of random 
2
(r + 1) draws to determine v
i
;i =
1;:::;n.
These steps constitute a single pass of the Gibbs sampler. We wish
to make a large number of passes to build up a sample (
j
;
j
;v
j
i
) of j
values from which we can approximate the posterior distributions for our
parameters.
To illustrate this approach in practice, consider example 3.1 which shows
the MATLAB code for carry out estimation using the Gibbs sampler set
forth above. In this example, we generate a regression model data set that
contains a heteroscedastic set of disturbances based on a time trend variable.
Only the last 50 observations in the generated data sample contain non-
constant variances. This allows us to see if the estimated v
i
parameters
detect this pattern of non-constant variance over the last half of the sample.
The generated data set used values of unity for 
0
,the intercept term,
and the two slope parameters, 
1
and 
2
. The prior means for the  pa-
rameters were set to the true values of unity with prior variances of unity,
reflecting a fair amount of uncertainty. The following MATLAB program
implements the Gibbs sampler for this model. Note how easy it is to imple-
ment the mathematical equations in MATLAB code.
% ----- Example 3.1 Heteroscedastic Gibbs sampler
n=100; k=3; % set number of observations and variables
x = randn(n,k); b = ones(k,1); % generate data set
tt = ones(n,1); tt(51:100,1) = [1:50]';
y = x*b + randn(n,1).*sqrt(tt); % heteroscedastic disturbances
ndraw = 1100; nomit = 100;
% set the number of draws
bsave = zeros(ndraw,k);
% allocate storage for results
ssave = zeros(ndraw,1);
vsave = zeros(ndraw,n);
c = [1.0 1.0 1.0]';
% prior b means
R = eye(k); T = eye(k);
% prior b variance
Q = chol(inv(T)); q = Q*c;
b0 = x\y;
% use ols starting values
CHAPTER 3. BAYESIAN SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS 89
sige = (y-x*b0)'*(y-x*b0)/(n-k);
V = ones(n,1); in = ones(n,1); % initial value for V
rval = 4;
% initial value for rval
qpq = Q'*Q; qpv = Q'*q;
% calculate Q'Q, Q'q only once
tic;
% start timing
for i=1:ndraw;
% Start the sampling
ys = y.*sqrt(V); xs = matmul(x,sqrt(V));
xpxi = inv(xs'*xs + sige*qpq);
b = xpxi*(xs'*ys + sige*qpv); % update b
b = norm_rnd(sige*xpxi) + b; % draw MV normal mean(b), var(b)
bsave(i,:) = b';
% save b draws
e = ys - xs*b; ssr = e'*e;
% update sige
chi = chis_rnd(1,n);
% do chisquared(n) draw
sige = ssr/chi; ssave(i,1) = sige; % save sige draws
chiv = chis_rnd(n,rval+1);
% update vi
vi = ((e.*e./sige) + in*rval)./chiv;
V = in./vi; vsave(i,:) = vi'; % save the draw
end;
% End the sampling
toc;
% stop timing
bhat = mean(bsave(nomit+1:ndraw,:)); % calculate means and std deviations
bstd = std(bsave(nomit+1:ndraw,:));
tstat = bhat./bstd;
smean = mean(ssave(nomit+1:ndraw,1));
vmean = mean(vsave(nomit+1:ndraw,:));
tout = tdis_prb(tstat',n); % compute t-stat significance levels
% set up for printing results
in.cnames = strvcat('Coefficient','t-statistic','t-probability');
in.rnames = strvcat('Variable','variable 1','variable 2','variable 3');
in.fmt = '%16.6f'; tmp = [bhat' tstat' tout];
fprintf(1,'Gibbs estimates \n'); % print results
mprint(tmp,in);
fprintf(1,'Sigma estimate = %16.8f \n',smean);
result = theil(y,x,c,R,T);
% compare to Theil-Goldberger estimates
prt(result); plot(vmean);
% plot vi-estimates
title('mean of vi-estimates');
We rely on MATLAB functions norm
rnd and chis
rnd to provide the
multivariate normal and chi-squared random draws. These functions are
part of the Econometrics Toolbox and are discussed in Chapter 8 of the
manual. Note also, we omit the rst 100 draws at start-up to allow the
Gibbs sampler to achieve a steady state before we begin sampling for the
parameter distributions.
The results are shown below, where we nd that it took only 11.5seconds
to carry out the 1100 draws and produce a sample of 1000 draws on which
we can base our posterior inferences regarding the parameters  and .
For comparison purposes, we produced estimates using the theil function
from the Econometrics Toolbox that implements mixed estimation. These
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested