c# pdf to image pdfsharp : Create pdf fillable form Library application class asp.net html windows ajax sp800-1223-part756

G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
4-8 
Audit Review, Analysis, and Reporting (AU-6).  Organizations can regularly review and analyze 
information system audit records for indications of inappropriate or unusual activity affecting PII, 
investigate suspicious activity or suspected violations, report findings to appropriate officials, and 
take necessary actions. 
Identification and Authentication (Organizational Users) (IA-2).  Users can be uniquely identified 
and authenticated before accessing PII.
65
The strength requirement for the authentication mechanism 
depends on the impact level of the PII and the system as a whole.  OMB M-07-16 specifies that 
Federal agencies must ―allow remote access only with two
-factor authentication where one of the 
factors is provided by a device separate from the computer gaining access,‖ and also must ―use a 
‗time
-
out‘ function for remote access and mobile devices requiring user re
-authentication after thirty 
minutes of inactivity.‖
Media Access (MP-2).  Organizations can restrict access to information system media containing PII, 
including digital media (e.g., CDs, USB flash drives, backup tapes) and non-digital media (e.g., 
paper, microfilm).  This could also include portable and mobile devices with a storage capability. 
Media Marking (MP-3).  Organizations can label information system media and output containing 
PII to indicate how it should be distributed and handled.  The organization could exempt specific 
types of media or output from labeling so long as it remains within a secure environment.  Examples 
of labeling are cover sheets on printouts and paper labels on digital media. 
Media Storage (MP-4).  Organizations can securely store PII, both in paper and digital forms, until 
the media are destroyed or sanitized using approved equipment, techniques, and procedures.  One 
example is the use of storage encryption technologies to protect PII stored on removable media. 
Media Transport (MP-5).  Organizations can protect digital and non-digital media and mobile 
devices containing PII that is transported outside the organization‘s controlled areas.  Examples of 
protective safeguards are encrypting stored information and locking the media in a container. 
Media Sanitization (MP-6).  Organizations can sanitize digital and non-digital media containing PII 
before it is disposed or released for reuse.
66
An example is degaussing a hard drive
applying a 
magnetic field to the drive to render it unusable. 
Transmission Confidentiality (SC-9).  Organizations can protect the confidentiality of transmitted 
PII.  This is most often accomplished by encrypting the communications or by encrypting the 
information before it is transmitted.
67
Protection of Information at Rest (SC-28).  Organizations can protect the confidentiality of PII at 
rest, which refers to information stored on a secondary storage device, such as a hard drive or backup 
tape.  This is usually accomplished by encrypting the stored information. 
Information System Monitoring (SI-4).  Organizations can employ automated tools to monitor PII 
internally or at network boundaries for unusual or suspicious transfers or events.  An example is the 
use of data loss prevention technologies. 
65
 For additional information about authentication, see NIST SP 800-63, Electronic Authentication Guideline
66
 For more information on media sanitization, see NIST SP 800-88, Guidelines for Media Sanitization
67
 NIST has several publications on this topic that are available from http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/PubsSPs.html
Create pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
converting pdf to fillable form; create a pdf form to fill out
Create pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
attach image to pdf form; create fillable form pdf online
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
5-1 
5.  Incident Response for Breaches Involving PII 
Handling incidents and breaches involving PII is different from regular incident handling and may require 
additional actions by an organization.
68
Breaches involving PII can receive considerable media attention, 
which can greatly harm an organization‘s reputation and reduce the public‘s trust
69
in the organization.  
Moreover, affected individuals can be subject to embarrassment, identity theft, or blackmail as the result 
of a breach involving PII.  Due to these particular risks of harm, organizations should develop additional 
policies, such as determining when and how individuals should be notified, when and if a breach should 
be reported publicly, and whether to provide remedial services, such as credit monitoring, to affected 
individuals.  Organizations should integrate these additional policies into their existing incident handling 
response policies.
70
Management of incidents involving PII often requires close coordination among personnel from across 
the organization, such as the CIO, CPO, system owner, data owner, legal counsel, and public relations 
officer.  Because of this need for close coordination, organizations should establish clear roles and 
responsibilities to ensure effective management when an incident occurs.    
FISMA requires Federal agencies to have procedures for handling information security incidents, and it 
directed OMB to ensure the establishment of a central Federal information security incident center, which 
is the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT).  Additionally, NIST provided guidance 
on security incident handling in NIST SP 800-61 Revision 1, Computer Security Incident Handling 
Guide In 2007, OMB issued M-07-16, which provided specific guidance to Federal agencies for 
handling incidents involving PII.
71
Incident response plans should be modified to handle breaches involving PII.  Incident response plans 
should also address how to minimize the amount of PII necessary to adequately report and respond to a 
breach.  NIST SP 800-61 Revision 1 describes four phases of handling security incidents.  Specific 
policies and procedures for handling breaches involving PII can be added to each of the following phases 
identified in NIST SP 800-61: preparation; detection and analysis; containment, eradication, and 
recovery; and post-incident activity.  This section provides additional details on PII-specific 
considerations for each of these four phases. 
5.1  Preparation 
Preparation requires the most effort because it sets the stage to ensure the breach is handled appropriately.  
Organizations should build their response plans for breaches involving PII into their existing incident 
response plans.  The development of response plans for breaches involving PII requires organizations to 
make many decisions about how to handle breaches involving PII, and the decisions should be used to 
develop policies and procedures.  The policies and procedures should be communicated to the 
organization‘s entire staff through training and awareness programs.
Training may include tabletop 
68
 For the purposes of this document, incident and breach are used interchangeably to mean any violation or imminent threat of 
violation of privacy or computer security policies, acceptable use policies, privacy rules of behavior, or standard computer 
security practices.  Modified from NIST SP 800-61 Revision 1. 
69
 According to a 2007 Government Privacy Trust Survey conducted by the Ponemon Institute, a Federal department fell from 
being a top five most trusted agency in 2006 to just above the bottom five least trusted agencies after the highly publicized 
breach of millions of PII records in 2006.  http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0207/022007tdpm1.htm
70
 Some organizations choose to have separate policies and procedures for incidents and breaches of PII, which may involve 
the use of a separate privacy incident response team.  If the policies and procedures are separate for incidents and breaches 
involving PII, then the security incident response plan should be amended so that staff members know when to follow the 
separate policies and procedures for incidents and breaches involving PII.   
71
 Organizations may also want to review 
Combating ID Theft: A Strategic Plan
from the President‘s Task Force on Identity 
Theft, April 2007, at: http://www.idtheft.gov/
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert word form to fillable pdf; convert pdf to fillable form online
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable
pdf fillable form creator; convert pdf to fill in form
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
5-2 
exercises to simulate an incident and test whether the response plan is effective and whether the staff 
members understand and are able to perform their roles effectively.  Training programs should also 
inform employees of the consequences of their actions for inappropriate use and handling of PII.   
The organization should determine if existing processes are adequate, and if not, establish a new incident 
reporting method for employees to report suspected or known incidents involving PII.  The method could 
be a phone hotline, email, online form, or a management reporting structure in which employees know to 
contact a specific person within the management chain.  Employees should be able to report any breach 
involving PII immediately on any day, at any time.  Additionally, employees should be provided with a 
clear definition of what constitutes a breach involving PII and what information needs to be reported.  The 
following information is helpful to obtain from employees who are reporting a known or suspected breach 
involving PII.
72
Person reporting the incident 
Person who discovered the incident 
Date and time the incident was discovered 
Nature of the incident 
Name of system and possible interconnectivity with other systems 
Description of the information lost or compromised 
Storage medium from which information was lost or compromised 
Controls in place to prevent unauthorized use of the lost or compromised information 
Number of individuals potentially affected 
Whether law enforcement was contacted. 
Federal agencies are required to report all known or suspected breaches involving PII,
in any format, to 
US-CERT within one hour.
73 
To meet this obligation, organizations should proactively plan their breach 
notification response.  A breach involving PII may require notification to persons external to the 
organization, such as law enforcement, financial institutions, affected individuals, the media, and the 
public.
74
Organizations should plan in advance how, when, and to whom notifications should be made.  
Organizations should conduct training sessions on interacting with the media regarding incidents.  
Additionally, OMB M-07-16 requires federal agencies to include the following elements in their plans for 
handling breach notification: 
Whether breach notification to affected individuals is required
75
Timeliness of the notification 
Source of the notification 
Contents of the notification 
72
 U.S. Department of Commerce, Breach Notification Response Plan, September 28, 2007 
73
 In M-07-16, OMB required Federal agencies to report all known or suspected PII breaches to US-CERT within one hour.  
This document does not change or affect any US-CERT reporting requirements as required by OMB, other NIST guidance, 
US-CERT, or statute.   
74
 For additional information about communications with external parties, such as the media, see NIST SP 800-61 Revision 1.  
75
 For Federal agencies, notification to US-CERT is always required. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
change font in pdf fillable form; add attachment to pdf form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
create a pdf form that can be filled out; add signature field to pdf
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
5-3 
Means of providing the notification 
Who receives the notification; public outreach response 
What actions were taken and by whom 
Additionally, organizations should establish a committee or person responsible for using the breach 
notification policy to coordinate the organization‘s response. 
Organizations also need to determine how 
incidents involving PII will be tracked within the organization.    
The organization should also determine what circumstances require the organization to provide remedial 
assistance to affected individuals, such as credit monitoring services.  The PII confidentiality impact level 
should be considered for this determination because it provides an analysis of the likelihood of harm for 
the loss of confidentiality for each instance of PII.   
5.2  Detection and Analysis 
Organizations may continue to use their current detection and analysis technologies and techniques for 
handling incidents involving PII.  However, adjustments to incident handling processes may be necessary, 
such as ensuring that the analysis process includes an evaluation of whether an incident involves PII.  
Detection and analysis should focus on both known and suspected breaches involving PII.  Detection of 
an incident involving PII also requires reporting internally, to US-CERT, and externally, as appropriate.  
5.3  Containment, Eradication, and Recovery 
Existing technologies and techniques for containment, eradication, and recovery may be used for breaches 
involving PII.  However, changes to incident handling processes may be necessary, such as performing 
additional media sanitization steps when PII needs to be deleted from media during recovery.
76
PII 
should not be sanitized until a determination has been made about whether the PII must be preserved as 
evidence.
77
Particular attention should be paid to using proper forensics techniques
78
to ensure 
preservation of evidence.  Additionally, it is important to determine whether PII was accessed and how 
many records or individuals were affected.     
5.4  Post-Incident Activity 
As with other security incidents, information learned through detection, analysis, containment, and 
recovery should be collected for sharing within the organization and with the US-CERT to help protect 
against future incidents.  The incident response plan should be continually updated and improved based 
on the lessons learned during each incident.  Lessons learned might also indicate the need for additional 
training, security controls, or procedures to protect against future incidents. 
Additionally, the organization should use its response policy, developed during the planning phase, to 
determine whether the organization should provide affected individuals with remedial assistance.  When 
providing notice to individuals, organizations should make affected individuals aware of their options, 
76
 For additional information on media sanitization, see NIST SP 800-88. 
77
 Often, information involved with an incident will need to be preserved in preparation for prosecution or litigation related to 
the incident.  Legal counsel should be consulted before any PII is sanitized. 
78
 For additional information, see NIST SP 800-86, Guide to Integrating Forensic Techniques into Incident Response
http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-86/SP800-86.pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
pdf add signature field; create fillable pdf form from word
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
create a pdf form to fill out and save; .net fill pdf form
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
5-4 
such as obtaining a free copy of their credit report, obtaining a freeze credit report, placing a fraud alert 
on their credit report, or contacting their financial institutions.
79
79
 Organizations may need to provide other types of remedial assistance for breaches that would cause harm unrelated to 
identity theft and financial crimes, such as PII maintained for law enforcement, medical care, or homeland security. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
convert pdf file to fillable form; create fillable form from pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with embedded Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
create a writable pdf form; create fill in pdf forms
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
A-1 
Appendix A
Scenarios for PII Identification and Handling 
Exercises involving PII scenarios within an organization provide an inexpensive and effective way to 
build skills necessary to identify potential issues with how the organization identifies and safeguards PII.  
Individuals who participate in these exercises are presented with a brief PII scenario and a list of general 
and specific questions related to the scenario.  After reading the scenario, the group then discusses each 
question and determines the most appropriate response for their organization.  The goal is to determine 
what the participants would really do and to compare that with policies, procedures, and generally 
recommended practices to identify any discrepancies or deficiencies and decide upon appropriate 
mitigation techniques.   
The general questions listed below are applicable to almost any PII scenario.  After the general questions 
are scenarios, each of which is followed by additional scenario-specific questions.  Organizations are 
encouraged to adapt these questions and scenarios for use in their own PII exercises.  Also, additional 
scenarios and questions specific to PII incident handling are available from NIST SP 800-61 Revision 1, 
Computer Security Incident Handling Guide.
80
A.1 
General Questions 
1.
What procedures are in place to identify, assess, and protect the PII described in the scenario? 
2.  Which individuals have designated responsibilities within the organization to safeguard the PII 
described in the scenario?
3.
To which people and groups within the organization should questions about PII or the possible 
misuse of PII be reported?   
4.  What could happen if the PII described in the scenario is not safeguarded properly? 
A.2 
Scenarios 
Scenario 1:  A System Upgrade 
An organization is redesigning and upgrading its physical access control systems, which consist of entry-
way consoles that recognize ID badges, along with identity management systems and other components.  
As part of the redesign, several individual physical access control systems are being consolidated into a 
single system that catalogues and recognizes biometric template data (a facial image and fingerprint), 
employee name, employee identification number (an internal identification number used by the 
organization) and employee SSN.  
The new system will also contain scanned copies of ―identity‖ 
documentation, including birth certificates, d
river‘s 
licenses, and/or passports.  In addition, the system 
will maintain a log of all access (authorized or unauthorized) attempts by a badge.  The log contains 
employee identification numbers and timestamps for each access attempt.   
1.
What information in the system is PII? 
2.  What is the PII confidentiality impact level?  What factors were taken into consideration when 
making this determination?
80
 SP 800-61 Revision 1 is available at http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/PubsSPs.html
.  
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
create fillable pdf form; change pdf to fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
convert word form to pdf with fillable; create pdf fillable form
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
A-2 
3
  By consolidating data into a single system, does it create additional vulnerabilities that could 
result in harm to the individual?  What additional controls could be put in place to mitigate the 
risk?
4
 Is all of the information necessary for the system to function?  Is there a way to minimize the 
information in the system?  Could PII on the system be replaced with anonymized data that is not 
PII?
5.  Is the organization required to conduct a PIA for this system?  
Scenario 2:  Protecting Survey Data 
Recently, an organization emailed to individuals a link to an online survey, which was designed to gather 
feedback about the organization‘s services.  The organization identified each individual by name, email 
address, and an organization-assigned ID number.  The majority of survey questions asked individuals to 
express their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the organization, but there were also questions asking 
individuals to provide their ZIP code along with demographic details on their age, income level, 
educational background, and marital status. 
The following are additional questions for this scenario:
1.
Which data elements collected through this survey should be considered PII? 
2.    What is the PII confidentiality impact level?  What factors were taken into consideration when                
making this determination? 
3.  How are determinations made as to which data from the survey is 
relevant to the organization‘s 
operations?  Does the Paperwork Reduction Act apply?  What happens to data that is deemed 
unnecessary? 
4.  What privacy-specific safeguards might help protect the PII collected and retained from this 
survey?   
5.  What other types of controls for safeguarding data (that are not necessarily specific to 
safeguarding PII) might be used to protect the data from the responses? 
Scenario 3:  Completing Work at Home 
An 
organization‘s
employee needed to leave early for a doctor‘s appointment, but the employee was not 
finished with her work for the day and had no leave time available.  Since she had the same spreadsheet 
application at home, she decided to email a data extract as an attachment to her personal email address 
and finish her work at home that evening.  The data extract was downloaded from an access-controlled 
hum
an resources database located on a server within the organization‘s security perimeter.  The extract 
contained employee names, identification numbers, dates of birth, salary information, manager names, 
addresses, phone numbers, and positions.  As she was leaving, she remembered that she had her personal 
USB flash drive in her purse.  She decided the USB drive would be good to use in case she had an 
attachment problem with the email she had already sent.  Although much of the USB 
drive‘s space was 
taken up with family photos she had shared with her coworkers earlier in the day, there was still enough 
room to add the data extract.  She copied the data extract and dropped it in her purse as she left for her 
appointment.  When she arrived home that evening, she plugged the USB drive into her 
family‘s
computer and used her spreadsheet application to analyze the data.       
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
A-3 
The following are additional questions for this scenario: 
1.  Which data elements contained in this data extract should be considered PII?   
2.  What is the PII confidentiality impact level?  What factors were taken into consideration when 
making this determination? 
3.  What privacy-specific safeguards might help protect the PII contained in the data extract?  
4.  What should the employee do if her purse (containing the USB drive) is stolen? What should the 
organization do?  How could the employer have prevented this situation? 
5.  What should the employee do with the copies of the extract when she finishes her work?   
6.  Should the emailing of the extract to a personal email address be considered a breach?  Should 
storing the data on the personal USB drive be considered a breach? 
7.  What could the organization do to reduce the likelihood of similar events in the future? 
8.  How should this scenario be handled if the information is a list of de-identified retirement income 
statistics?  Would the previous questions be answered differently?     
Scenario 4:  Testing Systems 
An organization needed to test an upgrade to its fingerprint matching system before the upgrade could be 
introduced into the production environment.  Because it is difficult to simulate fingerprint image and 
template data, the organization used real biometric image and template data to test the system.  In addition 
to the fingerprint images and templates, the system also processed the demographic data associated with 
each fingerprint image, including name, age, sex, race, date of birth, and nationality.  After successful 
completion of the testing, the organization upgraded its production system. 
1.  Which data elements contained in this system test should be considered PII?   
2.  What is the PII confidentiality impact level?  What factors were taken into consideration when 
making this determination? 
3.  What privacy-specific safeguards might help protect the PII used in this test? 
4.  Is a PIA required to conduct this testing?  Is a PIA required to complete the production system 
upgrade? 
5.  What should the organization do with the data used for testing when it completes the upgrade? 
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
B-1 
Appendix B
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) 
Privacy and security leadership and staff, as well as others, may have questions about identifying, 
handling, and protecting the confidentiality of personally identifiable information (PII).  This appendix 
contains frequently asked questions (FAQ) related to PII.  Organizations are encouraged to customize this 
FAQ and make it available to their user community. 
1.  What is personally identifiable information (PII)? 
PII is 
any information about an individual maintained by an agency, including (1) any information 
that c
an be used to distinguish or trace an individual‘s identity, such as name, social security number, 
date and place of birth, mother‘s maiden name, or biometric records; and (2) any other information 
that is linked or linkable to an individual, such as medical, educational, financial, and employment 
information.‖
81
2.  What are examples of PII
The following examples are meant to offer a cross-section of the types of information that could be 
considered PII, either singly or collectively, and is not an exhaustive list of all possibilities.  Examples 
of PII include financial transactions, medical history, criminal history, employment history, 
individual‘s name, social security number, passport number, driver‘s license number, credit card 
number, vehicle registration, x-ray, patient ID number, and biometric data (e.g., retina scan, voice 
signature, facial geometry).
82
3.   Does the definition of individual apply to foreign nationals? 
OMB defined the term individual, as used in the definition of PII,
to mean a citizen of the United 
States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence, which is based on the Privacy Act 
definition.
83
For the purpose of protecting the confidentiality of PII, organizations may choose to 
administratively expand the scope of application to foreign nationals without creating new legal 
rights.  Expanding the scope may reduce administrative burdens and improve operational efficiencies 
in the protection of data by eliminating the need to maintain separate systems or otherwise separate 
data.  Additionally, the status of citizen, alien, or legal permanent resident can change over time, 
which makes it difficult to accurately identify and separate the data of foreign nationals.  Expanding 
the scope may also serve additional organizational interests, such as providing reciprocity for data 
sharing agreements with other organizations.   
Agencies may also, consistent with individual practice, choose to extend the protections of the 
Privacy Act to foreign nationals without creating new judicially enforceable legal rights.  For 
example, DHS has chosen to extend Privacy Act protections (e.g., access, correction) to foreign 
81
 GAO Report 08-536, Privacy: Alternatives Exist for Enhancing Protection of Personally  
Identifiable Information, May 2008, http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d08536.pdf
82
 Organizations may want to consider how PII relating to deceased individuals should be handled, such as continuing to 
protect its confidentiality or properly destroying the information.  Organizations may want to base their considerations on 
any obligations to protect, organizational policies, or evaluation of organization-specific risk factors.  With respect to 
organization-specific risk factors, there is a balancing act because PII relating to deceased individuals can both promote and 
prevent identity theft.  For example, making available lists of deceased individuals can prevent some types of fraud, such as 
voter fraud.  In contrast, PII of a deceased individual also could be used to open a credit card account or to set up a false 
cover for criminals.  Organizations should consult with their legal counsel and privacy officer.  
83
 OMB M-03-22, OMB Guidance for Implementing the Privacy Provisions of the E-Government Act of 2002
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/memoranda/m03-22.html#1
.      
G
UIDE TO 
P
ROTECTING THE 
C
ONFIDENTIALITY OF 
P
ERSONALLY 
I
DENTIFIABLE 
I
NFORMATION 
(PII)
B-2 
nationals whose data resides in mixed systems, which are systems of records with information about 
both U.S. persons and non-U.S. persons.
84
Organizations should consult with legal counsel to determine if they have an additional obligation to 
protect the confidentiality of the personal information relating to foreign nationals, such as the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, which requires the protection of the confidentiality of Visa 
applicant data.
85
4.  How did the need for guidelines on protecting PII come about?  Why is this important? 
With the increased use of computers for the processing and dissemination of data, the protection of 
PII has become more important to maintain public trust and confidence in an organization, to protect 
the reputation of an organization, and to protect against legal liability for an organization.  Recently, 
organizations have become more concerned about the risk of legal liability due to the enactment of 
many federal, state, and international privacy laws, as well as the increased opportunities for misuse 
that accompany the increased processing and dissemination of PII.   
In the United States, Federal privacy laws are generally sector-based.  For example, the Health 
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) applies to the health care sector, and 
the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 (GLBA) applies to the financial services sector.  In contrast, 
many states have enacted their own generally applicable privacy laws, such as breach notification 
laws.  Some U.S.-based organizations that conduct business abroad must also comply with 
international privacy laws, which vary greatly from country to country.  Organizations are responsible 
for determining which laws apply to them based on sector and jurisdiction.  
For Federal government agencies, the need to protect PII was first established by the Privacy Act of 
1974.  It required Federal agencies to protect PII and apply the Fair Information Practices to PII.  
Also, the Privacy Act required 
agencies to ―establish appropriate administrative, technical
, and 
physical safeguards to ensure the security and confidentiality of records and to protect against any 
anticipated threats or hazards to their security or integrity which could result in substantial harm, 
embarrassment, inconvenience, or unfairness to any individual on whom information is maintained.‖
In response to the increased use of computers and the Internet to process government information, the 
E-Government Act of 2002 was enacted to ensure public trust in electronic government services.  It 
required Federal agencies to conduct Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) and to maintain privacy 
policies on their web sites.  The E-Government Act also directed OMB to issue implementation 
guidance to Federal agencies.  In 2003, OMB issued M-03-22 to provide guidance on PIAs and web 
site privacy policies.  OMB has continued to provide privacy guidance to Federal agencies on many 
PII protection topics such as remote access to PII, encryption of PII on mobile devices, and breach 
notification (see Appendix G for additional information).     
Additionally, Federal agencies are required to comply with other 
privacy laws, such as the Children‘s 
Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and HIPAA (only if the agency acts as a health care provider 
or other covered entity as defined by the statute). 
84  
See DHS Privacy Policy Regarding Collection, Use Retention, and Dissemination of Information on Non-U.S. Persons,     
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/privacy/privacy_policyguide_2007-1.pdf
.
85
 Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. § 1202.   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested