imagemagick pdf to image c# : Cannot save pdf form in reader SDK application project winforms windows web page UWP 05-welling-php-mysql-web74-part125

707
Defining the Script Architecture
display_items(‘Subscribed Lists’, get_subscribed_lists(get_email()), 
‘information’, ‘show-archive’, ‘unsubscribe’);
break;
}
case ‘change-password’ :
              
display_password_form();
break;
}
case ‘store-change-password’ :
              
if(change_password(get_email(), $_POST[‘old_passwd’], 
$_POST[‘new_passwd’], $_POST[‘new_passwd2’]))
{
echo ‘<p>OK: Password changed.</p>
<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />’;
}
else
{
echo ‘<p>Sorry, your password could not be changed.</p>’;
display_password_form();
break;
}
}
}
// The following actions may only be performed by an admin user
if(check_admin_user())
{
switch ( $action )
{
case ‘create-mail’ :
{
display_mail_form(get_email());   
break;
}
case ‘create-list’ :
{
display_list_form(get_email());   
break;
}
case ‘store-list’ :
{
Listing 30.2 Continued 
Cannot save pdf form in reader - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
adding images to pdf forms; change text size pdf form
Cannot save pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
pdf form change font size; convert word to editable pdf form
708
Chapter 30 Building a Mailing List Manager
if(store_list($_SESSION[‘admin_user’], $_POST))
{
echo ‘<p>New list added</p><br />’;
display_items(‘All Lists’, get_all_lists(), ‘information’, 
‘show-archive’,’’);
}
else     
echo ‘<p>List could not be stored, please try ‘
.’again.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />’;  
break;
}
case ‘send’ :
{
send($_GET[‘id’], $_SESSION[‘admin_user’]);   
break;
}
case ‘view-mail’ :
{
display_items(‘Unsent Mail’, get_unsent_mail(get_email()), 
‘preview-html’, ‘preview-text’, ‘send’);
break;
}
}
/**********************************************************************
* Section 4: display footer 
*********************************************************************/
do_html_footer();
?>
You can see the four segments of the code clearly marked in this listing. In the prepro-
cessing stage,you set up the session and process any actions that need to be done before
headers can be sent.In this case, they include logging in and out.
In the header stage,you set up the menu buttons that the user will see and display the
appropriate headers using the 
do_html_header()
function from 
output_fns.php
.This
function just displays the header bar and menus,so we don’t discuss it in detail here.
Listing 30.2 Continued 
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
SaveFile(String filePath): Save PDF document file to a specified path in a file dialog and load your PDF document in will be a pop-up window "cannot open your
add text field to pdf; chrome pdf save form data
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
because you can make sure that the PDF file cannot be altered pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument.Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into
add print button to pdf form; edit pdf form
709
Defining the Script Architecture
In the main section of the script,you respond to the action the user has chosen.
These actions are divided into three subsets:actions that can be taken if not logged in,
actions that can be taken by normal users,and actions that can be taken by administra-
tive users.You check to see whether access to the latter two sets of actions is allowed by
using the 
check_logged_in()
and 
check_admin_user()
functions.These functions are
located in the 
user_auth_fns.php
function library.The code for these functions and the
check_normal_user()
function are shown in Listing 30.3.
Listing 30.3 Functions from user_auth_fns.php—These Functions Check Whether
a User Is Logged In and at What Level
function check_normal_user()
// see if somebody is logged in and notify them if not
{
if (isset($_SESSION[‘normal_user’]))
return true;
else
return false;
}
function check_admin_user()
// see if somebody is logged in and notify them if not
{
if (isset($_SESSION[‘admin_user’]))
return true;
else
return false;
}
function check_logged_in()
{
return ( check_normal_user() || check_admin_user() );
}
As you can see, these functions use the session variables 
normal_user
and 
admin_user
to check whether a user has logged in.We explain how to set up these session variables
shortly.
In the final section of the 
index.php
script,you send an HTML footer using the
do_html_footer()
function from 
output_fns.php
.
Let’s look briefly at an overview of the possible actions in the system.These actions
are shown in Table 30.2.
C# Image: How to Use C# Code to Capture Document from Scanning
installed on the client as browsers cannot interface directly Save a the customized multi-page document to a a multi-page document (including PDF, TIFF, Word
add submit button to pdf form; change font size pdf form
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
designed image and document, then you cannot miss RasterEdge image or document files; Able to save created rubber Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document
create a pdf form; adding an image to a pdf form
710
Chapter 30 Building a Mailing List Manager
Table 30.2 Possible Actions in the Mailing List Manager Application
Action
Usable By
Description
log-in
Anyone
Gives a user a login form
log-out
Anyone
Ends a session
new-account
Anyone
Creates a new account for a user
store-account
Anyone
Stores account details
show-all-lists
Anyone
Shows a list of available mailing lists
show-archive
Anyone
Displays archived newsletters for a particular list
information
Anyone
Shows basic information about a particular list
account-settings
Logged-in users
Displays user account settings
show-other-lists
Logged-in users
Displays mailing lists to which the user is not sub-
scribed
show-my-lists
Logged-in users
Displays mailing lists to which the user is sub-
scribed
subscribe
Logged-in users
Subscribes a user to a particular list
unsubscribe
Logged-in users
Unsubscribes a user from a particular list
change-password
Logged-in users
Displays the change of password form
store-change-
Logged-in users
Updates a user’s password in the database
password
create-mail
Administrators
Displays a form to allow upload of newsletters
create-list
Administrators
Displays a form to allow new mailing lists to be
created
store-list
Administrators
Stores mailing list details in the database
view-mail
Administrators
Displays newsletters that have been uploaded but
not yet sent
send
Administrators
Sends newsletters to subscribers
One noticeable omission from Table 30.2 is an option along the lines of 
store-mail
that is,an action that actually uploads the newsletters entered via 
create-mail
by
administrators.This single piece of functionality is actually in a different file,
upload.php
.
We put this functionality in a separate file because it makes keeping track of security
issues a little easier on us,the programmers.
Next, we discuss the implementation of the actions in the three groups listed 
in Table 30.2—that is,actions for people who are not logged in,actions for logged-in
users,and actions for administrators.
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Codes to Add Watermark in a TIFF Image
would not be obscured and cannot be removed for TIFF watermark embedding; Easily save updated TIFF powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
create a fillable pdf form; change font size pdf fillable form
VB.NET Word: .NET Project for Merging Two or More Microsoft Word
REDocument), fileNameMerged, New DOCXEncoder()) 'save new word Unfortunately, it cannot be used in commercial profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert word doc to pdf with editable fields; cannot save pdf form
711
Implementing Login
Implementing Login
When a brand-new user comes to your site,you would like him to do three things.First,
you want the user to look at what you have to offer;second,to sign up with you;and
third, to log in.We look at each of these tasks in turn.
Figure 30.4 shows the screen presented to users when they first come to the site.
Figure 30.4 On arrival, users can create a new account,view available lists,
or just log in.
We look at creating a new account and logging in now and then return to viewing list
details in the “Implementing User Functions”and “Implementing Administrative
Functions”sections.
Creating a New Account
If a user selects the New Account menu option,this selection activates the 
new-account
action.This action,in turn, activates the following code in 
index.php
:
case ‘new-account’ :
{
// get rid of session variables
session_destroy();
display_account_form();
break;
}
This code effectively logs out a user if she is currently logged in and displays the account
details form,as shown in Figure 30.5.
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Windows TIFF Viewer | Online
document annotating support; Simple to save and output would be an notice with "cannot open your file powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
create a pdf form to fill out; pdf editable fields
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word SaveFile(String filePath): Save loaded file to a specified there will prompt a window "cannot open your
change pdf to fillable form; create a fillable pdf form online
712
Chapter 30 Building a Mailing List Manager
Figure 30.5 The new account creation form enables users to 
enter their details.
This form is generated by the 
display_account_form()
function from the
output_fns.php
library.This function is used both here and in the 
account-settings
action to display a form to enable the user to set up an account.If the function is
invoked from the 
account-settings
action,the form will be filled with the user’s exist-
ing account data.Here,the form is blank,ready for new account details.Because this
function outputs only HTML,we do not go through the details here.
The submit button on this form invokes the 
store-account
action.The code for this
action is as follows:
case ‘store-account’ :
{
if (store_account($_SESSION[‘normal_user’],
$_SESSION[‘admin_user’], $_POST))
$action = ‘’;
if(!check_logged_in())
display_login_form($action);
break;
}
The 
store_account()
function,shown in Listing 30.4,writes the account details to the
database.
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Easy to view, edit, annotate and save Excel (.xlsx there will prompt a window "cannot open your file powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add form fields to pdf without acrobat; pdf save form data
C# PowerPoint: Document Viewer Creating in Windows Forms Project
C#.NET users to edit, annotate and save PowerPoint document NET tutorial, we will take a blank form as an control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your
cannot save pdf form in reader; adding text fields to pdf
713
Implementing Login
Listing 30.4 store_account()Function from mlm_fns.php—This Function Adds a
New User to the Database or Stores Modified Details About an Existing User
function store_account($normal_user, $admin_user, $details)
{
if(!filled_out($details))
{
echo ‘All fields must be filled in.  Try again.<br /><br />’;
return false;
}
else
{
if(subscriber_exists($details[‘email’]))
{
//check logged in as the user they are trying to change
if(get_email()==$details[‘email’])
{
$query = “update subscribers set realname = ‘{$details[‘realname’]}’,
mimetype = ‘{$details[‘mimetype’]}’
where email = ‘{$details[‘email’]}’”;
if($conn=db_connect())
{
if ($conn->query($query))
return true;
else
return false;
}
else
{
echo ‘Could not store changes.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />’;
return false;
}
}
else
{
echo ‘<p>Sorry, that email address is already registered here.</p>’.
‘<p>You will need to log in with that address to change ‘.
‘ its settings.</p>’;
return false; 
}
}
else // new account
{
714
Chapter 30 Building a Mailing List Manager
$query = “insert into subscribers 
values (‘{$details[‘email’]}’,
‘{$details[‘realname’]}’,
‘{$details[‘mimetype’]}’,
sha1(‘{$details[‘new_password’]}’),
0)”; 
if($conn=db_connect())
{
if ($conn->query($query))
return true;
else
return false;
}
else
{
echo ‘Could not store new account.
<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />’;
return false;
}
}
}
}
This function first checks that the user has filled in the required details.If this is okay,the
function will then either create a new user or update the account details if the user
already exists.A user can update only the account details of the user he is logged in as.
The logged-in user’s identity is checked using the 
get_email()
function,which
retrieves the email address of the user who is currently logged in.We return to this func-
tion later because it uses session variables that are set up when the user logs in.
Logging In
If a user fills in the login form you saw in Figure 30.4 and clicks on the Log In button,
she will enter the 
index.php
script with the 
email
and 
password
variables set.This acti-
vates the login code,which is in the preprocessing stage of the script,as follows:
// need to process log in or out requests before anything else
if($_POST[‘email’]&&$_POST[‘password’])
{
$login = login($_POST[‘email’], $_POST[‘password’]);
if($login == ‘admin’)
{
Listing 30.4 Continued 
715
Implementing Login
$status .= “<p><b>”.get_real_name($_POST[‘email’]).
“</b> logged in”.” successfully as <b>Administrator</b></p>
<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />”;
$_SESSION[‘admin_user’] = $_POST[‘email’];
}
else if($login == ‘normal’)
{
$status .= “<p><b>”.get_real_name($_POST[‘email’]).”</b> logged in”
.” successfully.</p><br /><br />”;
$_SESSION[‘normal_user’] = $_POST[‘email’];
}
else
{
$status .= “<p>Sorry, we could not log you in with that 
email address and password.</p><br />”;
}
}
if($action == ‘log-out’)
{
unset($action);
unset($_SESSION);
session_destroy();
}
As you can see, you first try to log the user in by using the 
login()
function from the
user_auth_fns.php
library.This function is slightly different from the login functions
used elsewhere,so let’s look at it more closely.The code for this function is shown in
Listing 30.5.
Listing 30.5 login()Function from user_auth_fns.php—This Function Checks a
User’s Login Details
function login($email, $password)
// check username and password with db
// if yes, return login type 
// else return false
{
// connect to db
$conn = db_connect();
if (!$conn)
return 0;
$query = “select admin from subscribers 
where email=’$email’
and password = sha1(‘$password’)”;
716
Chapter 30 Building a Mailing List Manager
$result = $conn->query($query);
if (!$result)
return false;
if ($result->num_rows<1)
return false;
$row = $result->fetch_array();  
if($row[0] == 1)
return ‘admin’;
else
return ‘normal’;
}
In previous login functions, you returned 
true
if the login was successful and 
false
if
it was not. In this case,you still return 
false
if the login failed,but if it was successful,
you return the user type,either 
‘admin’
or 
‘normal’
.You check the user type by
retrieving the value stored in the 
admin
column in the 
subscribers
table,for a particu-
lar combination of email address and password.If no results are returned,you return
false
.If a user is an administrator,this value will be 1 (
true
),so you return 
‘admin’
.
Otherwise,you return 
‘normal’
.
Returning to the main line of execution,you register a session variable to keep track
of who the user is. She is either 
admin_user
if she is an administrator or 
normal_user
if
she is a regular user.Whichever one of these variables you set will contain the email
address of the user.To simplify checking for the email address of a user, you use the
get_email()
function mentioned earlier.This function is shown in Listing 30.6.
Listing 30.6 get_email()function from user_auth_fns.php— This Function
Returns the Email Address of the Logged-In User
function get_email()
{
if (isset($_SESSION[‘normal_user’]))
return $_SESSION[‘normal_user’];
if (isset($_SESSION[‘admin_user’]))
return $_SESSION[‘admin_user’];
return false;
}
Back in the main program, you report to the user whether she was logged in and at
what level.
The output from one login attempt is shown in Figure 30.6.
Listing 30.5 Continued 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested