pdf first page to image c# : Change font in pdf fillable form software SDK project winforms windows html UWP author.manual3-part1554

6 AUTHORING RADIO, OPTION, STRING RESPONSE PROBLEMS
31
8.
Figure 14: Hint Element
5. Below it, you will see Foil 2. Remove the text in the text box and put an incorrect
answer for the problem. Ex: “Purple.” Make sure this is set to false in the Correct
Option field.
6. Repeat the previous step until you’ve filled in all of the other incorrect answers you
wish to offer the students.
7. Once you’ve filled in all of the incorrect answers, delete any extra foils or change the
Correct Options on the other foils to Unused.
9. Scroll down to the Hint element. See the figure 14 Type some text that will help
students when they answer incorrectly. You may delete the hint by selecting Yes from
the Delete drop-down box.
10. Click the Submit Changes button located at the top of the frame. If you do not do
this, your changes will not be saved.
The Correct Option drop down box controls whether or not a given answer will be accepted
as a correct answer. If it is set to true, that answer will be considered a correct answer. Any
number of foils can be marked true, but only one will be shown to any given student. If it
is set to false, it will be considered an incorrect answer. If it is set to Unused, the system
will not use that foil.
6.1.1 Randomization
LON-CAPA will randomize the choices presented to each student and the order they are
presented. If you wish to present a random set of incorrect answers, create more foils than
you wish to display, and then set the Maximum Number of Shown Foils to a value less
than the number of foils created. If you wish to present each student the same choices, make
sure the Maximum Number of Shown Foils box contains a number greater or equal to
the number of foils that you created, which will force them to all be displayed.
6.2 Authoring Option Problems
To create an Option Response problem, create a new resource as described in section 5. This
is a “problem” resource so the URL must end in “.problem”. You should see a screen as in
figure “Option Response Editor”.
Change font in pdf fillable form - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
chrome save pdf form; adding an image to a pdf form
Change font in pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
create a fillable pdf form; adding text fields to a pdf
6 AUTHORING RADIO, OPTION, STRING RESPONSE PROBLEMS
32
Figure 15: Option Response Editor
1. In the drop-down option box as seen in figure 5, select Option Response Problem
with N Concept Groups, where N is the number of Concept Groups you wish the
problem to have, and click the New Problem button.
2. Click the Edit button above the sample problem to enter edit mode. You should see
the Option Response page open up.
3. Replace the text in the Text Block with text that explains the conditions for your
problem.
4. Locate the Max Number of Shown Foils element and type a number from 1 to 8
to display that number of questions. You cannot display more than one foil from each
concept group, so this option will only reduce the number of foils displayed, if it is less
than the number of concept groups in your Option Response problem.
5. Now you must define the options the students can select. For each option you wish to
add to the Option Response question, type the option into the Add new Option box
in the Select Options section, then hit the Save Changes button. If you do not hit
the Save Changes button, your option will not be selectable below. (You can delete
unwanted options in the last step.)
6. Now, you need to define the question foils. Look for the foil with the name “One”.
Type the question into the text box and select the correct option for that question
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
framework. Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box.
changing font size in pdf form field; add text field pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
allow users to save pdf form; change font size pdf form reader
6 AUTHORING RADIO, OPTION, STRING RESPONSE PROBLEMS
33
from the Correct Option drop-down menu. Click Submit Changes to save this
question foil. Repeat this step for all remaining foils.
7. Locate the foils that are not being used. In their Delete menus, set the value to
Yes. Once you’ve set the Delete menu value correctly for all the foils, click the Save
Changes button.
8. In the Hint area, provide a helpful hint for users who get the problem incorrect, and
click the Save Changes button.
9. Make sure all the options you want to delete are not used for any of your foils. If a
deleted option is used in a foil, it will appear in a text box in the Correct Option area
for that foil. To make the drop-down box reappear, type an option already defined in
the Select Options field, and hit Submit Changes. A drop-down box will reappear.
To delete the irrelevant options from the Option Response question, select that option
from the Delete an Option drop down, and hit the Save Changes button. Do this
for each option you wish to remove.
6.3 Simple Option Response: No Concept Groups
If you select Simple Option Response from the drop-down box, you will get a template
that will allow you to enter up to eight foils with no grouping. The system will randomly
mix these foils when presenting them to the student. You can have more foils than the Max
Num of Shown Foils so that each student will not have the identical foils.
6.4 Authoring a String Response Problem
To create a String Response problem, create a new resource (described in 5.2. This is a
“problem” resource so the URL must end in “.problem”.
1. In thedrop-down option box as seen in the figure 5, selectString Response Problem,
and click the New Problem button.
2. Click the Edit button above the sample problem to enter edit mode. You should see
the String Response editor page open up, which should look something like what you
see in the figure 16.
3. Clear the text from the Text Block at the top of the problem, and type in your
problem.
4. In the Answer Box, type the correct answer.
5. Select the answer condition from the drop-down. There are three cases to choose from:
(a) cs: This means “Case Sensitive”. For example, this is useful in chemistry, where
HO and Ho are completely different answers. The student must match the case
of the answer.
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
convert word to editable pdf form; add form fields to pdf without acrobat
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
pdf form change font size; add submit button to pdf form
6 AUTHORING RADIO, OPTION, STRING RESPONSE PROBLEMS
34
Figure 16: String Response Editor
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable C#.NET Project DLLs: Conversion from OpenOffice to PDF in C#.NET. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
change font in pdf form field; add fillable fields to pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll
change text size pdf form; add text fields to pdf
7 AUTHORING NUMERICAL, FORMULA, CUSTOM RESPONSE QUESTIONS
35
(b) ci: This means “Case Insensitive”. The system does not use the case of the
letters to determine the correctness of the answer. If the correct answer is “car”,
the system will accept “car”, “CAR”, “Car”, “caR”, etc.
(c) mc: This means “Multiple Choice”. The student’s answers must contain the
same letters as the question author’s, but order is unimportant. This is usually
used to give a multiple choice question in the question’s Text Block, which may
have several correct parts. If the author sets the correct answer as “bcg”, the
system will accept “bcg”, “cbg”, “gcb”, etc., but not “bc” or “abcg”.
It is conventional to inform the students if the problem is case sensitive, or that the
order of the answers doesn’t matter.
6. Optionally, locate the Single Line Text Entry Area block and set a length in the
Size box. This will only affect the size of the box on the screen; if you set the box size
to 2, the student can still enter 3 or more letters in their answer.
7. Scroll down to the Hint element, and type some text that will help students when
they answer incorrectly, or delete the hint by setting the Delete field to Yes.
8. Click the Submit Changes button.
7 Authoring Numerical, Formula, Custom Response
Questions
7.1 Authoring Numerical Response and Formula Response Prob-
lems
Numerical Response problems are answered by entering a number and an optional unit. For
instance, a numerical response problem might have an answer of 2m/s
2
.Formula Response
problems areanswered by entering a mathematical formula. For instance, a formula response
problem might have an answer of x
2
+11. The answer may be in any equivalent format. For
instance, for x
2
+11, the system will also accept x∗x + 11 or x
2
+21− 10.
Numerical Response problems are very powerful. In fact, they are so powerful it would
be impossible to fully explain what is possible in a simple document. This chapter will
focus on getting you started with Numerical Response problems and show you some of the
possibilities, with no prerequisite knowledge necessary. The more you learn, the more you
will find you can do.
If you like, you can follow this chapter as its own tutorial. Create a Numerical Response
problem using the instructions in the “Authoring Content in LON-CAPA” section 5, ending
your resource name with “.problem”, and create a new Simple Numerical Response
problem.
7.2 The Parts of a Numerical Response Problem
ANumerical Response problem has seven major parts by default:
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
adding form fields to pdf files; build pdf forms
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
pdf form save; cannot save pdf form
7 AUTHORING NUMERICAL, FORMULA, CUSTOM RESPONSE QUESTIONS
36
Figure 17: Numerical Response editor
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
change font pdf fillable form; adding image to pdf form
7 AUTHORING NUMERICAL, FORMULA, CUSTOM RESPONSE QUESTIONS
37
1. The Script is the heart of advanced Numerical Response problems. It can be used to
decide some of the parameters of the problem, compute the answer to the problem,
and do just about anything else you can imagine. The Script language is Perl. You
do not need to know Perl to use the Script block because we will be stepping through
some advanced examples in this chapter, but knowing Perl can help.
2. Like other problem types, the Text Block is used to display the problem the student
will see. In addition, you can placevariables in the Text Block based on computations
done in the Script.
3. The Answer is the answer the system is looking for. The answer can use variables
calculated/defined in the problem’s Script block, allowing the answer to be determined
dynamically (including randomization).
4. A tolerance parameter determines how closely the system will require the student’s
answer to be in order to count it correct. The tolerance will default to zero if it is not
defined. The tolerance parameter should always be defined for a numerical problem
unless you are certain only integer answers are generated from your script and you
want students to reply with exactly that integer.
If the computer answer is a floating point number, the tolerance should not be zero.
Computers can only approximate computations involving real numbers. For instance,
acomputer’s [decimal] answer to the simple problem
1
3
is “0.33333333333333331”. It
should be an infinite series of 3’s, and there certainly shouldn’t be a “1” in the an-
swer, but no computer can represent an infinitely long, infinitely detailed real number.
Therefore, for any problem where the answer is not an integer, you need to allow a
tolerance factor, or the students will find it nearly impossible to exactly match the
computer’s idea of the answer. You may find the default tolerance too large for some
problems, so adjust as appropriate.
There are three kinds of tolerance. For some answer A and a tolerance T,
(a) an Absolute tolerance will take anything in the range A ± T. So if A = 10
and T = 2, then anything between 8 and 12 is acceptable. Any number in the
tolerance field without a % symbol is an absolute tolerance.
(b) a Relativetolerance will takeanything in therangeA±aT, whereT is interpreted
as a percentage/100. Any number in the tolerance field followed by a % symbol
is a relative tolerance. For example, a = 10 and t = 10% will accept anything
between 9 and 11.
(c) a tolerance that is a calculated variable (identified by $ sign as the first character).
For example, if an answer is $X,and for astudent possible values range from −$X1
to +$X1, you could choose T = $tolerance = $2X1/100; acceptable answers
would then be from $X − $tolerance to $X + $tolerance. (This is especially
useful when answers close to zero are possible for some students)
Some care is necessary when setting the display format of the computer answer. Before
testing the tolerance, LON-CAPA converts the computer answer, as generated in the
script block, according to the format attribute in the numericalresponse tag.
7 AUTHORING NUMERICAL, FORMULA, CUSTOM RESPONSE QUESTIONS
38
Next, the formatted comptuer answer is ”graded” relative to the significant figures pa-
rameter, if it is set (see section 5. If that test was passed, then a numerical comparison
of the Computer’s answer is made with the range of values:
($computerAnswer - $tolerance) < $formattedcomputerAnswer < ($computerAnswer
+$tolerance)
If the $formattedcomputerAnswer satisfies the permitted range, then ”correct” is re-
turned for the computer answer. It is good idea to test multiple randomizations to
make sure that your tolerance is compatible with the display format.
5. A significant figures specification is an optional setting that tells LON-CAPA how
many significant figures there are required for the answer, as either a single number,
e.g. 3, or a range of acceptable values, expressed as min,max. The significant figures
field can be omitted if you do not want to constrain the number of significant digits in
the student answers.
The system will check to ensure that the student’s answer contains the required sig-
nificant digits, useful in many scientific calculations. For example, if the computer
answer is “1.3”, and the problem requests three significant digits, specified by (en-
tered without quotes) “3”, the system will require the students to type “1.30”, even
though numerically, “1.3” and “1.30” are the same. A significant figure specification
of (entered without quotes) “3,4” means both “1.30” and “1.300” are acceptable.
Authors should be clear in the problem statements to tell students therequired number
or range of significant figures. If the student response does not contain the correct
number of significant digits, the LON-CAPA response will tell students to increase or
decrease the digits in their response, but it will not tell them how many digits to use.
These responses do not use up the number of trials, but such responses are frustrating
for students. If you would like to ensure that at least three significant digits are used,
then a specification such as 3,15 ensures at least three digits are used, but will quietly
accept up to 15.
Note that care must be used when using formatted computer answers together with
asignificant digit specification. You must ensure that the formatted answer provides
enough significant digits. To test the formatted answer, LON-CAPA converts the com-
puter answer, as generated in the script block, according to the format attribute in
the numericalresponse tag, e.g. 3f. Then LON-CAPA separately applies that num-
ber of significant figures to the computer answer, and if that result falls outside the
range specified in the significant digit parameter, it ”grades” the computer answer as
SIG
FAIL (i.e., not correct). It is a good idea to use the problem testing environment
to test plenty of different randomizations to make sure that your format and sig digits
parameters are compatible. This helps ensure that the formatted answer has enough
significant digits.
6. The Single Line Text Entry area, as in other problem types, allow you to manipulate
the text entry area the student will see.
7 AUTHORING NUMERICAL, FORMULA, CUSTOM RESPONSE QUESTIONS
39
7. Finally, the Hint should contain text which will help the students when they answer
incorrectly.
7.3 Simple Numerical Response Answer
Along with showing the Numerical Response editor, figure 17 also shows the parameters for
one of the simplest possible types ofnumerical responses. The Text Block has the problem’s
question, which is the static text “What is 2 + 2?” The Answer is “4”. The Hint has been
set to something appropriate for this problem. Everything else has the default values from
when the problem was created.
If you create a problem like this, hit Submit Changes, then hit View after the changes
have been submitted, you can try the problem out for yourself. Note the last box in the
HTML page has the answer LON-CAPA is looking for conveniently displayed for you, along
with the range the computer will accept and the number of significant digits the computer
requires when viewed by an Author.
As you’re playing with the problem, if you use up all your tries or get the answer correct
but wish to continue playing with the problem, use the Reset Submissions button to clear
your answer attempts.
7.4 Simple Script Usage
Totally static problems only scratch the surface of the Numerical Response capabilities. To
really explore the power of LON-CAPA, we need to start creating dynamic problems. But
before we can get to truly dynamic problems, we need to learn how to work with the Script
window.
A script consists of several statements, separated by semi-colons. A statement is
the smallest kind of instruction to the computer. Most problems will be built from several
statements.
Ascript can contain comments, which are not interpreted as statements by the com-
puter. Comments start with # and go to the end of that line. Thus, if a line starts with #,
the whole line is ignored. Comments can also begin in the middle of a line. It is a good idea
to comment more complicated scripts, as it can be very difficult to read a large script and
figure out what it does. It is a very good idea to adopt some sort of commenting standard,
especially if you are working in a group or you believe other people may use your problems
in the future.
• One of the simplest statements in LON-CAPA is a variable assignment. A variable
can hold any value in it. The variable name must start with a $. In the Script, you
need to assign to variables before you use them. Put this program into the Script field
of the Numerical Response:
$variable = 3;
This creates a variable named variable and assigns it the value of “3”. That’s one
statement.
7 AUTHORING NUMERICAL, FORMULA, CUSTOM RESPONSE QUESTIONS
40
Variable names are case sensitive, must start with a letter, and can only consist of letters,
numbers, and underscores. Variable names can be as long as you want.
There are many variable naming conventions, covering both how to name and how to
capitalize variables
1
.It is a good idea to adopt a standard. If you are working with a group,
you may wish to discuss it in your group and agree on a convention.
If you Submit Changes and View the problem, you will see nothing has changed. This
is because in order for a variable to be useful, it must be used. The variable can be used in
several places.
7.4.1 Variables in Scripts
Variables can be used later in the same script. For instance, we can add another line below
the $variable line as such:
$variable2 = $variable+2;
Now there is a variable called $variable2 with the the number “5” as its value.
Variables can also be used in strings, which are a sequence of letters. The underlying
language of the script, Perl, has a very large number of ways of using variables in strings,
but the easiest and most common way is to use normal double-quotes and just spell out the
name of the variable you want to use in the string, like this:
$stringVar = "I have a variable with the value $variable.";
This will put the string “I have a variable with the value 3.” into the variable named
“stringVar”.
If you are following this chapter as a tutorial, add the previous two lines to your Script
and submit the changes for the problem. There’s no need to view it; there’s still no visible
change.
7.4.2 Variables in the Text Block
Once you’ve defined variables in the Script, you can display them in the Text Block. For
example, using the previous three-line script we’ve created so far, you can place the following
in the Text Block:
See the 3: $variable<br />
See the string: <b>$stringVar</b><br />
If you save that and hit View, you should get what you see in figure 18. Note how the
“$variable” was turned into a 3, and the “$stringVar” was turned into “I have a variable
with the value 3.”
1
The author favors capsOnNewWords. Some people use underscore
to
separate
words. Many use up-
percaseletters to specify constants like PI or GOLDEN
MEAN.Some people always StartWithCapatalization.
What’s really important is to be consistent, so you don’t have to guess whether the variable you’re thinking
of is coefFriction, CoefFriction, COEF
FRICTION, or something else.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested