pdf first page to image c# : Android edit pdf forms control Library system azure asp.net winforms console 0782129781.excerpt0-part158

ch a p t e r
1
Manipulating Strings
Understanding how string values are stored and 
used in VBA
Using the built-in VBA string-handling functions
Searching for and replacing text
Gathering information about strings
Converting strings
Working with substrings
COPYRI
GHTED
 MATERI
AL
Android edit pdf forms - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
add email button to pdf form; can reader edit pdf forms
Android edit pdf forms - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
cannot edit pdf form; chrome save pdf with fields
Chapter 1
Manipulating Strings
2
A
lmost any VBA application will need t o handle string (text) data at one 
point or another. VBA itself provides a useful set of string-handling functions, but 
the functionality of other functions as a whole is not nearly as full-featured as that 
provided by other, more text-centric programming languages. This chapter first 
makes a quick pass through the existing functions and then provides many useful 
routines to add to your string-handling bag of tricks. Surely, no chapter on this 
topic could cover every possible combination of useful functions, but the ones we’ve 
provided here should give you a good start in writing your own VBA solutions.
The sample files you’ll find on the CD-ROM that accompanies this book are 
listed in Table 1.1:
Because the modules for this chapter take advantage of ADO, you’ll need to make
sure your own project includes a reference to the Microsoft ActiveX Data Object 2.1
Library before you import the StringsBAS module into the project. Use the Tools 
References menu (or Project 
References menu, in Visual Basic) to add the neces-
sary reference. Otherwise, your code will not compile once you’ve added the
Strings module to your project.
TABLE 1.1:
String-Handling Functions
Filename
Description
STRINGS.XLS
Excel file with sample functions
STRINGS.BAS
Text file with sample functions
TESTSTR.BAS
Text file with test procedures
PROPER.MDB
Access 2000 database, containing sample for dhProperLookup
PROPER.TXT
Text version of sample for dhProperLookup
PROPER.XML
XML-based recordset for dhProperLookup
STRINGS.VBP
Visual Basic project with sample code
STRINGS.MDB
Access 2000 database, containing sample functions
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
utilize C# mobile PDF document viewer on Android, IOS & but also permit me to redact and edit target PDF web PDF document viewer SDK and C# PDF document viewer
add image field to pdf form; can save pdf form data
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
Eaisly save and print designed PDF document using C# code; PDF document viewer can be created in C# Web Forms, Windows Form and mobile applications.
best program to create pdf forms; pdf form change font size
How Does VBA Store Strings?
3
How Does VBA Store Strings?
A VBA string is simply a collection of bytes. To make it easier for VBA to work 
with strings, each string also maintains its own information about its length. In 
addition, unlike other programming languages, VBA takes care of creating, 
destroying, and resizing string buffers. You needn’t worry about how VBA finds 
strings in memory, whether they’re contiguous in memory, or how or when VBA 
reclaims the memory of the string used once you’re done with it.
VBA provides two types of strings: 
fixed-length
and 
dynamic
. Fixed-length 
strings are those you declare with a fixed size, like this:
Dim strFixed As String * 100
In this case, strFixed will always contain exactly 100 characters, no matter how 
many characters you’ve placed into it. When VBA first creates the variable, at run-
time, it fills the variable with 100 spaces. From then on, if you attempt to retrieve 
the length of the string, the output will always be 100:
Debug.Print Len(strFixed)
VBA fills the extra positions with spaces. You’ll need to use the Trim function in 
order to use the string in any other expression (see the section “Working with Por-
tions of a String” later in this chapter for more information). Fixed-length strings 
can be no longer than 65,526 characters.
Online help for VBA states that a fixed-length string can be up to 2
16
(or
65,536) characters long. Not so—if you attempt to create one with more than 65,526
characters, VBA won’t compile your code.
Dynamic strings, on the other hand, have no fixed size. As you add or remove 
characters from these objects, VBA takes care of locating memory in which to 
place the text and allocates and deallocates memory as necessary for your text. To 
declare a dynamic string, you use a declaration like this:
Dim strDynamic As String
In this case, if you retrieve the length of the string, the result will accurately reflect 
the amount of text you’ve placed into the variable. Dynamic strings can contain 
up to around two billion characters.
VB.NET TIFF: Examples to Create VB.NET TIFF Document Viewer in .
file on your mobile device such Android and iOS. Freely edit and save / restore the multi-page TIFF powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
android edit pdf forms; build pdf forms
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Mobile Viewer in VB.NET Doc Image Program
free to read PDF document in Android based mobile which gives you time flexibility of PDF document viewing for ASP.NET AJAX, Silverlight, Windows Forms as well
add fillable fields to pdf online; pdf save form data
Chapter 1
Manipulating Strings
4
How do you decide which type of string to use? Dynamic strings require a bit 
more processing effort from VBA and are, accordingly, a bit slower to use. On the 
other hand, you make up the time by not needing to use the Trim function to remove 
excess space every time you use the string. As you’ll see by working through the 
examples in this chapter, we use fixed-length strings only when it’s necessary. 
When working with a single character at a time, it makes sense to use a fixed-length 
string declared to contain a single character. Because you know you’ll always 
have only a single character in the string, you’ll never need to trim off excess 
space. You get the benefits of a fixed-length string without the extra overhead.
Unicode versus ANSI
The 32-bit Windows “universe” supports two character storage mechanisms: 
ANSI and Unicode. The ANSI storage standard uses a single byte for every char-
acter, with only 256 different characters allowed in any ANSI character set. If you 
want to display characters from a different set of 256, you must load a separate 
code page. This limitation makes it difficult to create internationalized applica-
tions. Windows 95 and Windows 98 use this approach for compatibility with pre-
vious versions of Windows. The Unicode standard allows for 65,536 characters, 
each taking up two bytes. The Unicode character set includes just about all the 
known written characters and ideograms in a single entity. In this way, an appli-
cation that embraces the Unicode standard can support (once its text has been 
translated) just about any written language. Windows NT and Windows 2000 
support the Unicode standard.
No matter what operating system you’re using, VBA stores strings internally in 
Unicode format. That is, every character takes up two bytes of space. When VBA 
needs to communicate with Windows 95 or Windows 98 (when you include Win-
dows API calls in your code, for example), it must first convert strings to ANSI 
format. This happens automatically when you use the ANSI version of a Win-
dows API call that involves strings. The only other time you’ll care about how 
VBA stores strings is when you want to convert a string into an array of bytes—a 
useful technique that we’ll take advantage of a few times in this chapter. In this 
case, a string containing five characters becomes an array of bytes containing ten 
bytes. For example, a string containing the text 
Hello
would contain the following 
ten bytes, once converted to a byte array:
72  0  101  0  108  0  108  0  111  0
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Windows Word Viewer | Online
can be embedded within .NET Windows Forms applications to you are able to open and edit Word document in your mobile projects, like iPhone and Android projects
pdf form save in reader; create a pdf form from excel
VB.NET TIFF: Use VB.NET Class to Create TIFF File Mobile Viewer in
view your TIFF image in Android mobile application ASP.NET AJAX, Silverlight, Windows Forms as well powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change font size pdf form; pdf editable fields
Unicode versus ANSI
5
Each pair of bytes (72 and 0 for the 
H
, for example) represents the Unicode stor-
age for a single character. However, if you were running Microsoft Excel in Korea, 
for example, and were entering text in your native language, the second byte 
wouldn’t be 0. Instead, it would be a value that combined with the first byte to 
represent the character you’d typed.
Using Strings and Byte Arrays
Because it’s often faster and simpler to work with arrays of bytes than to work with indi-
vidual characters in a string (and you’ll find some examples in this chapter that use this
technique), VBA provides a simple way to convert strings into byte arrays and back. Simply
assigning a string to a byte array variable causes VBA to copy the data into the array.
When you’re done working with the array, you can assign it right back into the string vari-
able. For example, the following code fragment copies data from a string into a byte array,
performs processing on the array, and then copies the array back into the string:
Sub StringToByteArray()
Dim strText As String
Dim aByt() As Byte
Dim intI As Integer
strText = "Hello"
' VBA allows you to assign a string into
' a byte array and then back again.
aByt() = strText
For intI = LBound(aByt) To UBound(aByt)
Debug.Print aByt(intI);
Next intI
Debug.Print
strText = aByt()
Debug.Print strText
End Sub
Although you won’t use this technique often, if you need to process each byte of a string,
it’s the best solution.
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Mobile Safari; Opera, Opera for Android, Opera Mini. ASP.NET AJAX, Silverlight, Windows Forms as well powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
best way to make pdf forms; create a pdf form to fill out
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
most mobile browsers like iOS and Android; Convert your ShowedText: "double click to edit", TextColor: "Black & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
create a fillable pdf form online; add editable fields to pdf
Chapter 1
Manipulating Strings
6
In previous versions of Basic, many programmers used string variables to contain
binary data (that is, non-textual data, such as bitmaps, sound files, and so on). In
VBA, this isn’t necessary, nor is it advisable. Instead, use arrays of bytes for non-
textual data. Because VBA performs ANSI-to-Unicode conversions on the fly,
you’re almost guaranteed that your non-text data will be ruined once you place it
into a string variable.
Using Built-In String Functions
VBA provides a large number of string-handling functions. This section intro-
duces many of those functions, broken down by the area of functionality, and dis-
cusses the most useful of the built-in functions. The remainder of the chapter 
provides techniques that combine the built-in functions to perform tasks for 
which you would otherwise need to write custom code.
Comparing Strings
VBA provides three ways for you to compare the contents of one string with 
another: comparison operators (such as =, <, and so on), the Like operator, and the 
StrComp function. In addition, you can specify the method of comparison for each 
module using the Option Compare statement in the declarations area.
Option Compare
The Option Compare statement, if it’s used at all, must appear in a module before 
any procedures, and it tells VBA how you want to make string comparisons 
within the module. The choices are as follows:
Option Compare Binary
Comparisons are made based on the internal sort 
order of the characters, using their binary representation. In this situation, char-
acters are treated case sensitively (that is, 
A
isn’t the same as 
a
).
Option Compare Text
Comparisons are made based on the text sort order of 
the current locale. Characters are treated, at least in English, case insensitively.
Option Compare Database
Is available only in Microsoft Access. Compar-
isons are made based on the locale ID of the current database.
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile enables you to view, crop, rotate and zoom PDF documents in iOS and Android mobile platforms in
change font in pdf form field; change pdf to fillable form
C# Word: How to Create Word Mobile Viewer in with Imaging SDK
Aimed to enable your Android, iOS and Windows White", ShowedText: "double click to edit", TextColor: "Black & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
build pdf forms; best way to create pdf forms
Using Built-In String Functions
7
If you don’t specify an Option Compare setting, VBA uses Option Compare Binary.
In that case, if you attempt to perform a simple comparison between 
A
and 
a,
you’ll get a False return value. If you’re working with strings and performing
comparisons, make sure you’re aware of the Option Compare setting for the
module.
Comparison Operators
You can use the simple logical operators to compare two strings, like this:
If strText1 < strText2 Then...
In this case, VBA performs a character-by-character comparison according to the 
Option Compare setting in force in the current module. The result of the compari-
son will most likely change, based on that setting. You can use the set of simple 
comparison operators shown here.
In addition, VBA supplies the Like operator for comparing two strings. This 
operator allows you to specify wildcards, character lists, and character ranges in 
the comparison string, not just fixed characters. The following is a listing of all the 
options for the comparison string using the Like operator:
Operator
Description
<
Less than
<=
Less than or equal to
>=
Greater than or 
equal to
=
Equal to
<>
Not equal to
Characters in Pattern
Matches in String
?
Any single character
*
Zero or more characters
#
Any single digit (0–9)
[charlist]
Any single character in 
charlist
[!charlist]
Any single character not in 
charlist
Chapter 1
Manipulating Strings
8
The string containing the wildcard information must be on the right-hand side of
the Like operator. That is, unlike many mathematical operators, this one is not
commutative: The order of the operands is significant.
For example, the following code fragment would compare a string with a 
template that checks for valid Canadian Postal codes:
strTemp = "W1F 8G7"
If strTemp Like "[A-Z]#[A-Z] #[A-Z]#" Then
' You know strTemp is a valid Canadian Postal Code
End If
To check whether the single character in strTemp was a vowel, you could use 
this expression:
If strTemp Like "[AEIOUaeiou]*" Then
' You know the first character in strTemp is a vowel
End If
If you want to see whether the word stored in strTemp doesn’t start with a 
vowel, you could use an expression like this:
If strTemp Like "[!AEIOUaeiou]*" Then
' You know the word in strTemp doesn’t start with a vowel
End If
You’ll find the Like operator to be invaluable when you need to validate input. 
Rather than parse the string yourself, you can use wildcards to allow various 
ranges of characters.
The behavior of the Like operator depends on the Option Compare setting. Unless
you specify otherwise, each module uses Option Compare Binary (case-sensitive
comparisons).
There are a number of issues you need to be aware of when using the Like
operator (sorting, order of the characters within the range, and so on). Be sure to
check out the online help for this topic for more information.
Using Built-In String Functions
9
Using the StrComp Function
The StrComp function provides a way for you to compare strings, overriding the 
Option Compare statement within a given module. To use StrComp, you specify 
the two strings and a comparison method (binary, text, or database), and the func-
tion returns a value indicating how the two strings compared. In general, you call 
StrComp like this:
intRetVal = StrComp(strText1, strText2, CompareOption)
The two text strings can be any string expressions. The CompareOption value 
should be one of the items from Table 1.2 or a locale ID integer that specifies a 
local sort order for comparisons. Depending on the parameters, StrComp returns 
one of the values from Table 1.3.
The CompareOption parameter for StrComp is optional. If you omit it, VBA uses
the option selected by the Option Compare setting for the module. If you omit the
Option Compare, of course, VBA will use binary comparisons (vbBinaryCompare).
Online help incorrectly supplies a fourth value, not shown in Table 1.2 (vbUse-
CompareOption, –1). This value doesn’t appear to work in the current version of
VBA. For any function that takes a comparison option as a parameter, you may not
use the vbUseCompareOption value. (No matter what the online help tells you.)
TABLE 1.2:
Compare Options for StrComp
Constant
Option Compare Equivalent
vbBinaryCompare
Option Compare Binary
vbDatabaseCompare
Option Compare Database (Microsoft Access only)
vbTextCompare
Option Compare Text
TABLE 1.3:
Return Values for StrComp
If
StrComp Returns
strText1 is less than strText
–1
strText1 is equal to strText
0
strText1 is greater than strText2
1
Chapter 1
Manipulating Strings
10
Using the StrComp function, even if you normally perform case-sensitive com-
parisons, you can override that requirement for one comparison:
If StrComp(strText1, strText2, vbTextCompare) = 0 Then
' You know that strText1 and strText2 are the same, as far
' as the text comparison goes.
End If
Converting Strings
Rather than provide individual functions to convert strings from one format to 
another, VBA includes the single StrConv function. This function allows you to 
specify a string, as well as a conversion parameter indicating the conversion you’d 
like to make. In general, you call the function like this:
strOutput 
= StrConv(
strInput
Conversion, [LocaleID]
)
where 
strInput
is the string to be converted; 
Conversion
is a value from the follow-
ing table; and 
LocaleID
(optionally) specifies the Windows LocaleID to use for the 
conversion. (If you don’t specify a locale ID, VBA will use the current locale’s 
information in order to perform the conversion.) StrConv returns the converted 
string as its return value.
As you can see, the StrConv function performs two basic tasks: converting the 
case (upper, lower, proper) of strings and converting strings from ANSI to Uni-
code and back.
If you’re working in a Japanese or other Far East locale, you’ll want to check out
the options for StrConv that are available only in those locales. See the VBA online
help for more information.
Constant
Description
vbUpperCase
Converts the string to uppercase characters.
vbLowerCase
Converts the string to lowercase characters.
vbProperCase
Converts the first letter of every word in the string 
to uppercase.
vbUnicode
Converts the string to Unicode using the default 
code page of the system.
vbFromUnicode
Converts the string from Unicode to the default 
code page of the system.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested