pdf first page to image c# : Adding signature to pdf form application software utility azure windows web page visual studio 0782129781.excerpt1-part159

Using Built-In String Functions
11
Creating Strings: The Space and String Functions
VBA provides two functions that make it easy for you to create specific strings. 
The Space function lets you create a string consisting only of spaces; you indicate 
the number of spaces, and VBA does the rest. The general syntax looks like this:
strOut 
= Space(
lngSpaces
)
Although this function has many uses, we’ve used it most often in two particu-
lar situations:
Creating string buffers when calling external DLLs (the Windows API, in 
particular)
Padding strings so they’re left or right justified within a buffer of a particu-
lar size
You can use an expression like this to create a 10-character string of spaces:
strTemp = Space(10)
If you need more flexibility, you can use the String function to create a string of 
any number of a specified character. For this function, you specify the number of 
characters you need and the specific character or ANSI value to repeat:
strOut = String(lngChars, strCharToRepeat)
' or
strOut = String(lngChars, intCharToRepeat)
For example, either of the following fragments will return a string containing 10 
occurrences of the letter a. (The ANSI value for a is 97.)
strOut = String(10, "a")
strOut = String(10, 97)
Although you’re unlikely to need this particular string, the following code frag-
ment creates a string consisting of one A, two Bs, three Cs, and so on.
Dim intI As Integer
Dim strOut As String
For intI = 1 To 26
strOut = strOut & String(intI, Asc("A") + intI - 1)
Next intI
Adding signature to pdf form - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
change font size pdf form reader; add text field to pdf
Adding signature to pdf form - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
change font size pdf fillable form; change font size in pdf form field
Chapter 1  Manipulating Strings
12
Calculating the Length of a String
Simple yet crucial, the Len function allows you to determine the length of any string 
or string expression. To use the function, pass it a string or string expression:
lngCharCount = Len(strIn)
Certainly, you’ll often need to find the length of a string expression. But the Len 
function also has an extra benefit: It’s fast! VBA stores strings with a long integer 
preceding the string that contains the length of the string. It’s very simple for VBA 
to retrieve that information at runtime. For example, what if you need to know 
whether a particular string currently contains no characters? Many programmers 
write code like this to check for an empty string:
If strTemp = "" Then
' You know strTemp is empty
End If
Because VBA can calculate string lengths so quickly, you’re better off using code 
like this to find out if a string is empty:
If Len(strTemp) = 0 Then
' You know strTemp is empty
End if
Performing one non-optimized comparison isn’t going to make any difference in 
the speed of your application, but if you check for empty strings often, consider 
using the Len function instead.
Formatting Data
VBA allows you to format the output display of a string using placeholders that rep-
resent single characters from the input string. In addition, you can use the Format 
function to convert an input string to upper- or lowercase. The placeholders and 
conversion characters shown in Table 1.4 allow you to reformat an input string.
For example, if strTemp contains the string “8364928”, the following fragment 
returns “(   )836-4928”:
strOut = Format("8364928", "(@@@)&&&-&&&&")
This fragment returns “()836-4928”:
strOut = Format("8364928", "(&&&)&&&-&&&&")
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures. Overview. XDoc.PDF also allows PDF security setting via digital signature.
best way to create pdf forms; change font in pdf form field
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. How To Tutorials. Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page redaction
adding form fields to pdf files; pdf form save with reader
Using Built-In String Functions
13
In addition, the Format function allows you to format normal strings one way 
and empty or null strings another. Every character following the symbol will be 
converted. For example, you may want to indicate an empty value differently 
from a value with data. To do this, use two sections in the placeholder string sepa-
rated with a semicolon (;). The first section will apply to non-empty strings, and 
the second will apply to empty strings. That is, the following statement places a 
formatted phone number into strOut if strIn contains a non-empty string, or it 
places “No phone” into strOut if strIn is an empty string or Null:
strOut = Format(strIn, "(@@@)&&&-&&&&;No phone")
To convert text to upper- or lowercase as it’s formatted, add the > or < character 
to the format string. (It doesn’t matter where you place the > or < character within 
the string. If it’s in there, VBA formats the string correctly.) Every character fol-
lowing the symbol will be converted. For example, the following fragment con-
verts the input text to uppercase and inserts a space between letters:
Format("hello there", ">@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @")
Although it’s beyond the scope of this chapter, the Format function can also
provide user-defined formatting for dates and numeric values. Check out Chapter 2
for more information on using Format with date values.
VBA also supplies two simple functions, UCase and LCase, that you can use to 
convert your functions to upper- and lowercase. Pass the function the string you 
TA BLE 1.4:
Placeholders and Conversion Characters for the Format Function 
Character
Description
@
Character placeholder for a character or a space. If the input string has a character in 
the position where the At symbol (@) appears in the format string, display it; otherwise, 
display a space in that position.
&
Character placeholder for a character or nothing. If the input string has a character in 
the position where the ampersand (&) appears, display it; otherwise, display nothing.
<
Displays all characters in lowercase format.
>
Displays all characters in uppercase format.
!
Forces left to right fill of placeholders. The default is to fill placeholders from right to 
left. The character can be placed anywhere in the format string.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
add form fields to pdf online; change font size pdf form
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures in VB to be respected, XDoc.PDF also allows PDF such security setting via digital signature.
add text fields to pdf; create pdf form
Chapter 1  Manipulating Strings
14
want converted, and its output will be the converted string. The following example 
places the word “HELLO” into strOut:
strOut = UCase("hello")
This chapter presents three ways to convert text to upper- or lowercase: the UCase/
LCase  functions,  the  >  and  <  characters  in  the  Format  function,  and  the
vbUpperCase and vbLowerCase constants with the StrConv function. Use the technique
that’s most comfortable for you.
Because using the Format function can be overkill in some circumstances, VBA 
also supplies simpler, special-case functions for situations when you simply need 
to format a date, a number, or a percent.
FormatCurrency, FormatNumber, FormatPercent
The FormatCurrency, FormatNumber, and FormatPercent functions each accept a 
numeric expression and optional parameters that specify how you want the out-
put value to be formatted. The obvious differences between the functions are that 
the FormatCurrency function formats its output as currency, while the other two 
functions simply format their output as a numeric value. FormatPercent also mul-
tiplies its result by 100 and tacks on a percent (%) sign. However, no matter what 
choices you make, the output value from all of these functions is always a string. 
Table 1.5 lists the parameters for the FormatCurrency, FormatNumber, and For-
matPercent functions. (All display options other than those shown in Table 1.5 are 
controlled by the Windows regional settings.) These parameters make it simple to 
format currency, numeric, and percent values.
Several of these functions include parameters that would appear to be Boolean
values (True or False) but, in fact, support three values: True, False, or Use Default.
That is, you can set these options to be either True or False specifically, or you can
use the default value specified in the Windows regional settings. To make it easier
for you to specify which of these three values you’d like to use, VBA provides an
enumerated type, vbTriState. All functions that can accept one of these three
values  allow  you  to  choose  from the  constants  vbTrue  (–1),  vbFalse  (0),  or
vbUseDefault (–2).
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Viewer for C# .NET provides permanent annotations adding feature, all enables you to create signatures to PDF, including freehand signature, text and
best way to make pdf forms; add attachment to pdf form
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
for C# .NET, users can convert PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) online, convert Users can perform text signature adding, freehand signature creation and date signature
pdf form save; best pdf form creator
Using Built-In String Functions
15
None of these functions does much that the more generic Format function can’t. 
But they’re a lot simpler to use (no character masks to memorize). Figure 1.1 
shows a session in the Immediate window, trying out various parameters for the 
FormatCurrency and FormatPercent functions. (FormatNumber would return 
similar results, but without the currency symbol.)
FIGU RE 1.1
You can use the Immediate
window to test out the
FormatCurrency and
FormatPercent functions.
TA BLE 1.5:
Formatting Function Parameters
Parameter
Required/
Optional
Data Type
Default
Description
Expression
Required
Numeric
Numeric value to be formatted.
NumDigitsAfterDecimal
Optional
Numeric
–1 (Use regional 
settings.)
Number of places after the decimal 
to be displayed. Use –1 to force 
regional settings. 
IncludeLeadingDigit
Optional
vbTriState
vbUseDefault
Display leading 0 for fractional 
values?
UseParensForNegativeNumbers
Optional
vbTriState
vbUseDefault
Display parentheses around 
negative numbers?
GroupDigits
Optional
vbTriState
vbUseDefault
Group digits. In the United States, 
this means to group every three 
digits from the right with a comma 
separator to indicate groupings of 
thousands?
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF file. What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create
pdf form save in reader; pdf form creator
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to create, edit, and remove PDF bookmark
cannot save pdf form in reader; change font pdf fillable form
Chapter 1  Manipulating Strings
16
FormatDateTime
The FormatDateTime provides a simple-to-use, but very limited, technique for 
formatting dates and times. It lacks the flexibility and power of the built-in Format 
function, but it is quite simple to use. It accepts a date/time value and, optionally, 
a formatting specifier, and returns a string formatted as a date and/or time. Table 1.6 
lists the parameters for the FormatDateTime function. Table 1.7 lists all the possible 
date formatting constants. Choose from these values when formatting a date.
Figure 1.2 shows a short debugging session, demonstrating the range of format-
ting possibilities with the FormatDateTime function.
TA BLE 1.6:
Parameters for the FormatDateTime Function
Parameter
Required/
Optional
Data Type
Default
Description
Expression
Required
Numeric
Numeric value to 
be formatted
NamedFormat
Optional
Numeric
vbGeneralDate (0)
Named format, 
selected from the 
values shown in 
Table 1.7, 
indicating how 
you want the 
date formatted
TA BLE 1.7:
Date Formatting Constants
Constant
Value
Description
vbGeneralDate
0
Return date and/or time. If there is a date part, include a 
short date. If there is a time part, include a long time. 
Include both date and time parts if both are available. 
vbLongDate
1
Return a date using the long date format specified by your 
computer’s regional settings. 
vbShortDate
2
Return a date using the short date format specified by your 
computer’s regional settings. 
vbLongTime
3
Return a time using the time format specified by your 
computer’s regional settings. 
vbShortTime
4
Return a time using the 24-hour format (hh:mm). 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office typing new signature, deleting added signature from the After adding such a control button, with a
pdf form change font size; add fields to pdf form
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. This smart and mature PDF image adding component of RasterEdge VB.NET PDF
add photo to pdf form; add fillable fields to pdf online
Using Built-In String Functions
17
FIGU RE 1.2
The FormatDateTime
function is simple, but lim-
ited, as you can see from
this debugging session.
MonthName and WeekdayName
Although seemingly simple, these two functions don’t have counterparts in previ-
ous versions of VBA. In VBA 5, if you need to find the name of a month, given its 
number, you might resort to writing a function like the MonthName shown here. 
(Actually, this is a complete replacement for the VBA 6 function, in case you need 
such a function in the previous version of VBA. And yes, you could use a simple 
Select Case statement, based on the Month value, but how would you get your 
function to work in other languages if you did that?)
Function MonthName(Month As Long, _
Optional Abbreviate As Boolean = False) As String
Dim strFormat As String
If Abbreviate Then
strFormat = "mmm"
Else
strFormat = "mmmm"
End If
MonthName = Format(DateSerial(2000, Month, 1), strFormat)
End Function
But you needn’t write or call this function: VBA 6 includes a built-in MonthName 
function. Given a month number and a Boolean value indicating whether you 
want to abbreviate the name, MonthName returns the localized month name. 
Chapter 1  Manipulating Strings
18
WeekDayName fills the same need, but instead returns the name of the day of 
the week corresponding to a numeric value (1 through 7, or vbSunday through 
vbSaturday). The syntax for WeekDayName looks like this:
strName = WeekdayName(weekday, [abbreviate], [firstdayofweek])
where the various parts are
weekday The day of the week, as a number. Normally, 1 corresponds with 
Sunday, and 7 corresponds with Saturday, although the firstdayofweek parame-
ter (and the local settings) can alter this behavior.
abbreviate Optional Boolean value that allows you to abbreviate the output 
weekday name. The default is False, which means that the weekday name isn’t 
abbreviated.
firstdayofweek Optional numeric value indicating the first day of the week. 
You can use vbUseSystem (0) to use the system value, or you can specify a par-
ticular day using the constants vbSunday (1) through vbSaturday (7).
Figure 1.3 shows a sample debugging session using these two functions.
FIGU RE 1.3
You can use the Immediate
window to test out Month-
Name and WeekDayName.
Reversing a String
StrReverse returns the string you send it, with the order of the characters reversed. 
We’re having a hard time finding a real use for this (except for writing your own 
InstrRev function, but that’s built into VBA now, too). Perhaps this is a good use:
Public Function IsPalindrome(strTest As String) As Boolean
' Is strTest a palindrome (the same forwards as backwards)?
IsPalindrome = (StrComp( _
strTest, StrReverse(strTest), vbTextCompare) = 0)
End Function
Using Built-In String Functions
19
It’s not clear how often you’ll need to know if a given string is the same forward 
and backward (that’s what a palindrome is: a string that’s the same in both direc-
tions), but should you ever need to know, this function does the work. For example, 
one of the famous palindromes “Madam, I’m Adam” works correctly in IsPalin-
drome, but only if you supply the value correctly. This function call returns True: 
? IsPalindrome("madamimadam")
StrReverse does exactly what it was intended to do, for those who need this 
functionality.
Justifying a String
VBA provides two statements, LSet and RSet (note that these aren’t functions) that 
allow you to justify a string within the space taken up by another. These state-
ments are seldom used in this context but may come in handy. In addition, LSet 
gives you powerful flexibility when working with user-defined data types, as 
shown later in this section.
LSet and RSet allow you to stuff a new piece of text at either the beginning or the 
end of an existing string. The leftover positions are filled with spaces, and any text 
in the new string that won’t fit into the old string is truncated.
For example, after running the following fragment, the string strOut1 contains 
the string “Hello   ” (“Hello” and three trailing spaces) and strOut2 contains 
“   Hello” (three leading spaces and then “Hello”).
strOut1 = "ABCDEFG"
strOut2 = "ABCDEFG"
LSet strOut1 = "Hello"
RSet strOut2 = "Hello"
Let’s face it: Most programmers don’t really take much advantage of LSet and
RSet with strings. They’re somewhat confusing, and you can use other string
functions to achieve the same result. However, using LSet with user-defined types
is key to moving data between different variable types and is discussed in the
following paragraphs.
LSet also supplies a second usage: It allows you to overlay data from one user-
defined type with data from another. Although the VBA help file recommends 
Chapter 1  Manipulating Strings
20
against doing this, it’s a powerful technique when you need it. Simply put, LSet 
allows you to take all the bytes from one data structure and place them on top of 
another, not taking into account how the various pieces of the data structures are 
laid out.
Imagine that you’re reading fixed-width data from a text file. That is, each of the 
columns in the text file contains a known number of characters. You need to move 
the columns into a user-defined data structure, with one field corresponding to 
each column in the text file. For this simple example, the text file has columns as 
described in the following list.
To work with the data from the text file, you’ve created a user-defined data structure:
Type TextData
FirstName As String * 10
LastName As String * 10
ZipCode As String * 5
End Type
You’ve used the various file-handling functions (see Chapter 5 for class mod-
ules to help work with text files) to retrieve a line of text from the file, and a String 
variable named strTemp now contains the following text:
"Peter     Mason     90064"
How do you get the various pieces from strTemp into a TextData data structure? 
You could parse the characters out using other string-handling functions, but you 
needn’t—LSet can do the work for you.
The only limitation of this technique is that you cannot use LSet to move data 
between a simple data type and a user-defined data type. It works only with two 
simple data elements (the technique shown earlier in this section) and with two 
user-defined data types. Attempting to write code like the following will fail:
Dim typText As TextData
' This won't work
LSet typText = strTemp
Column 
Name
Width
FirstName
10
LastName
10
ZipCode
5
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested