itextsharp pdf to image c# : Add fields to pdf software control project winforms azure wpf UWP be_E12-part1712

EMOTION is a fundamental part of human life. When a person ex-
presses his emotions, he reveals what is in his heart, the sort of per-
son he is inside, how he feels about situations and people. Because
of harsh experiences in their lives—and in some instances because of
cultural influences—many people hide their emotions. But Jehovah
encourages us to cultivate positive qualities in the inner
person and then to give appropriate expression to what is
there.—Rom.12:10; 1Thess.2:7, 8.
When we speak, the words we use may correctly identi-
fy emotions.But ifour words are notexpressed with corre-
sponding feeling, those who hear us may doubt our sin-
cerity. On the other hand, if the words are expressed with
appropriate feeling, our speech can take on a beauty and a richness
that may touch the hearts of thosewho are listening.
Expressing Warmth. Warm feelings are frequently associated with
thoughts about people. Thus, when we speak about Jehovah’s en-
dearing qualities and whenweexpress our appreciation for Jehovah’s
goodness,our voiceshould bewarm.(Isa.63:7-9)And whenspeaking
to fellow humans,our manner ofspeaking should also convey an ap-
pealing warmth.
Alepercomes to Jesus and begs to behealed. ImagineJesus’toneof
voice when he says: “I want to. Be made clean.” (Mark 1:40, 41) Pic-
ture,too,thesceneas awoman subjectto aflowof blood for 12 years
quietly approaches Jesus from behind and touches the fringe of his
outer garment. Upon realizing that she has not escaped notice, the
woman comes forward trembling,falls atJesus’ feet,and discloses be-
foreall the peoplewhy she has touchedhis garment andhowshe has
beenhealed.Thinkof themanner inwhichJesus says to her:“Daugh-
ter, your faith has made you well; go your way in peace.” (Luke 8:
42b-48) Thewarmth that Jesus displayed on those occasions touches
our hearts downto this day.
55 WARMTHANDFEELING

What doyou need to do?
Speak in a manner that reflects the emotions you feel and
that is consistent with what you are saying.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Itis essentialifyouare
toreachtheheartsofthose
listening.
118
Add fields to pdf - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
add image field to pdf form; change font size in pdf fillable form
Add fields to pdf - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
add text field to pdf; change pdf to fillable form
When,like Jesus, we feel compassion for people and whenwe tru-
ly want to help them, it shows in the way we speak to them. Such
an expression of warmth is sincere, not excessive. Our warmth can
makea big difference in how people respond. Most of the things we
say in the field ministry lend themselves to this kind of expression,
especially whenwe arereasoning,encouraging,exhorting, and sym-
pathizing.
If you have a warm feeling toward others, show it on your face.
When you manifest warmth, your audience is drawn to
you as to a fire on a cold night. If warmth is not evident
on your face, your audience may not be convinced that
you sincerely care aboutthem.Warmthcannot be put on
like a mask—it mustbe genuine.
Warmth should also be evident in your voice. If you
have a hard, coarse voice, it might be difficult to express
warmth in your speech. But with time and conscious ef-
fort, you can. One thing that might help, from a
purely mechanical standpoint,is to remember thatshort,
clipped sounds make speech hard. Learn to draw out the
softer sounds in words.This will help to put warmth into
your speech.
Of even greater importance, however, is the focus of
your interest. If your thoughts are centered sincerely on
those to whom you are speaking and you have an earnest desire to
convey something thatcan benefit them, that feeling will be reflect-
ed in theway you speak.
Aspirited delivery is stimulating, buttender feeling is also needed.
It is not always enough for us to persuade the mind; we must also
movethe heart.
Expressing OtherFeelings. Emotions suchas anxiety, fear, and de-
pression might be expressed by a person who is in distress. Joy is an
emotion that shouldbeprominent in ourlives andthatwe freely ex-
press when speaking to others. On the other hand, some emotions
needtobecurbed.They arenotconsistentwiththeChristianperson-
ality. (Eph. 4:31, 32;Phil. 4:4) Emotions ofall sorts can be conveyed
by thewords we choose, our tone of voice, the intensity with which
we speak,our facial expression, and gestures.
HOW TO EXPRESS IT
Insteadofbeingoverlycon-
cernedaboutthewords you
areusing,focus onyour de-
sireto helpyour listeners.
Bothyour toneofvoice
andyour facialexpression
shouldreflectwhatever
emotionisappropriatefor
yourmaterial.
Learnbycarefullyobserving
others who speakexpres-
sively.
Warmth and Feeling
119
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. C#.NET Demo Code: Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in C#.NET.
change font size in fillable pdf form; add picture to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
pdf form creation; add print button to pdf form
The Bible reports on the whole range of human emotions. Some-
times it simply names emotions. At other times it relates events or
quotes statements that reveal emotions. When you read such mate-
rial aloud, it will have a greater impact, both on you and on those
who are listening, if your voice reflects those emotions. To do that
you need to put yourself in the place of those about whom you are
reading. A talk is not a theatrical production, however, so be careful
not to exaggerate. Make the passages live in the minds of those who
are listening.
Appropriate tothe Material.As with enthusiasm,thewarmthyou
putintoyourexpressionandtheother emotions you express depend
in large measure onwhatyou are saying.
Turn to Matthew 11:28-30, and take note of what it says. Then
read Jesus’ condemnationof the scribes and Pharisees,asrecorded in
Matthewchapter23.We cannot imaginehim expressing these scath-
ing words of condemnation in a dull and lifeless way.
Whatsortoffeeling do you believe is required by an account such
as thatinGenesis chapter 44 concerning Judah’s pleaforhis brother
Benjamin? Notice the emotion expressed in verse 13, the indication
in verse 16 of how Judah felt about the reason for the calamity, and
how Joseph himselfreacted, as stated at Genesis 45:1.
Thus, whether we are reading or speaking, to do so effectively we
mustgivethoughtnotonly to words and ideas butalsotothefeeling
that ought to accompany these.
EXERCISE:
Readaloud thefollowingportions of Scripture, doing so withfeelingappro-
priate to the material: Matthew 20:29-34; Luke 15:11-32.
120
Warmth and Feeling
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding an image to a pdf form; pdf form save with reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
change font size pdf form reader; add fillable fields to pdf
PEOPLE of some cultures gesture more freely than those from oth-
erbackgrounds.Yet,practically everyone talks with changes of facial
expression and some form of gesturing.This is true both in personal
conversation and inpublic speaking.
Gestures were natural to Jesus and his early disciples. On one occa-
sion, someone reported to Jesus that his mother and his
brothers wanted to speak with him. Jesus replied: “Who
is my mother, and who are my brothers?” Then the Bi-
ble adds:“Extending his hand toward his disciples, he said:
‘Look! My mother and my brothers!’” (Matt. 12:48, 49)
Among other references,theBibleshows at Acts 12:17 and
13:16thattheapostles Peter and Paul also madespontane-
ous use of gestures.
Ideas and feelings are communicated not only with the
voice butalso by means ofgestures and facial expressions.
Failure to use these well may convey an impression of indifference
on the part of the one speaking. But when these means of commu-
nication are tastefully blended, the effectiveness of speech is greatly
enhanced. Even when you speak over the telephone, if you make ap-
propriate use of gestures and facial expressions, your voice will more
readily convey the importance of your message as well as your per-
sonal feelings about what you are saying. Thus, whether you are
speaking extemporaneously or are reading, whether your audience is
looking at you or at their own copies of the Bible, gestures and facial
expressions are of value.
Your gestures and your facial expressions should notbetaken from
abook. You neverhad to study howto laugh or how to be indignant.
Gestures should also express feelings that are within you. The more
spontaneous your gestures, the better.
56
GESTURES AND FACIAL EXPRESSIONS

What doyou need to do?
Use movements of the hands, the shoulders, or the entire
body to express ideas, sentiments, or attitudes.
Use the eyes and the mouth as well as the positioning of the
head to reinforce the spokenword and to convey feelings.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Gesturesandfacialex-
pressions addvisualand
emotional emphasisto your
speech. They may stirup
your feelingsandtherefore
enlivenyour voice.
121
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
create a pdf form that can be filled out; convert word to editable pdf form
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
chrome save pdf with fields; changing font size in a pdf form
Gestures fall into two general categories: descriptive and emphat-
ic. Descriptive gestures express action or show dimension and loca-
tion.In the school, whenyou are working on the use of gestures,do
not be content with just one or two. Try to gesture in a natural way
throughout your talk. If you are having difficulty in doing this, you
may find it helpful to look for words that show direction, distance,
size, location, or relative positions. In many cases, however, all that
you needtodois to getabsorbed inyour talk,notworrying aboutthe
impression you are making, but saying and doing things
as you would in daily life. When a person is relaxed, ges-
tures come naturally.
Emphatic gestures express feeling and conviction. They
punctuate, vitalize, and reinforce ideas. Emphatic ges-
tures are important. But beware! Emphatic gestures can
easily become mannerisms. If you use the same gesture
again and again, it may begin to draw attention to itself
insteadofenhancing your talk.Ifyour school overseer in-
dicates that you have this problem, try limiting yourself
solely to descriptive gestures for a time. After a while, be-
gin to use emphaticgestures once more.
In determining theextentto whichyou should useem-
phaticgestures and the sort of gestures that are appropri-
ate, consider the feelings of those to whom you are speaking. Point-
ing at the audience may make them feel uncomfortable. If a male
in some cultures were to make certain gestures, such as putting his
hand over his mouth to express surprise, this would be viewed as ef-
feminate. In some parts of the world, it is considered immodest for
womentogesturefreely withthehands.So inthoseplaces,sisters es-
pecially need to make good use of facial expressions. And before a
small group, sweeping gestures may be viewed as comical in almost
any partof the world.
As you gain experience and become more at ease in speaking, any
emphatic gestures that you do use will express your inner feelings
naturally, demonstrating your conviction and sincerity. They will
add meaning to your speech.
The Expression on YourFace. Morethananyother bodily feature,
your face often expresses how you really feel. Your eyes, the shape
POINTS TO KEEP
IN MIND
Themosteffectivegestures
andfacialexpressions
springfrom one’sinnerself.
Observewhatothersdo,
butdonottry toimitate
themindetail.
Study thematerialfor your
talksuntilyouknow itwell.
Feelit, visualizeit,andthen
useyour voice,your hands,
and your faceto express it.
122
Gestures and Facial Expressions
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
create pdf forms; pdf form save
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically. Document Protect.
edit pdf form; best pdf form creator
of your mouth, the inclination of your head all play a part. With-
outa word being spoken, your face can convey indifference, disgust,
perplexity, amazement,or delight.When such facial expressions ac-
company the spoken word, they add visual and emotional impact.
The Creator has placed a large concentration of muscles in your face
—over30 inall.Nearly halfof these comeinto playwhenyou smile.
Whether you are on the platform or are participating in the field
ministry, you are endeavoring to share with people a message that is
pleasant, one that can make their hearts rejoice. A warm smile con-
firms that. On the other hand, if your face is devoid of expression,
this may raise questions about your sincerity.
More than that, a smile tells others that you have a kindly feeling
toward them.Thatis especially importantinthesedays whenpeople
are oftenafraid of strangers.Your smile can help people to relax and
to be more receptive to what you say.
EXERCISES:
(1) Read Genesis 6:13-22. Inyour own words, describe the building of the
ark and thegatheringofthe animals. Do not worry about details; simply tell
what you remember. Use descriptive gestures while doing so. Ask someone
to observe you and provide comments. (2) Talk as if you were witnessing
to someone about God’s Kingdom and the blessings that it will bring. Be
sure that your facial expressions reflect how you really feel about what you
are describing.
Gestures and Facial Expressions
123
OUR eyes communicate attitudes and emotions. They may indicate
surpriseor fear.They may convey compassionorlove.Attimes,they
may betray doubt or give evidence of grief. Concerning his country-
men, who had suffered much, an elderly man said: “We speak with
our eyes.”
Others may draw conclusions about us and about what
we say on the basis of where we focus our eyes. In many
cultures, people tend to trust an individual who main-
tains friendly eye contact with them. Conversely, they
may doubt the sincerity or competence of a person who
looks athis feetoratsome objectrather thanattheoneto
whom he is talking. Some other cultures view any inten-
siveeyecontactas rude,aggressive,orchallenging.This is
especially the case when speaking with members of the
opposite sex or to a chief or other titled person. And in
someareas,ifayounger personwereto makedirecteyecontactwhen
speaking to an older person, this would be viewed as disrespectful.
However,whereit is notoffensive,looking anindividual inthe eye
when making an important statement can add emphasis to what is
said. It may be viewed as evidence of conviction on the part of the
speaker. Notice how Jesus responded when his disciples expressed
greatsurprise andsaid:“Whoreallycanbesaved?”TheBible reports:
“Looking them in the face, Jesus said to them: ‘With men this is im-
possible,butwith God all things arepossible.’”(Matt.19:25,26)The
Scriptures also show that the apostle Paul keenly observed the reac-
tions of those in his audience. On one occasion a man lame from
birth was present when Paul spoke. Acts 14:9, 10 states: “This man
was listening toPaul speak,who, on looking athimintently and seeing
he had faith to be made well, said with a loud voice: ‘Stand up erect
on your feet.’”
57 VISUALCONTACT

What doyou need to do?
Look at those to whom you are speaking, allowing your eyes
to meet for a few seconds if that is acceptable locally. See
individuals, not merely a group.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Inmanycultures, eye
contactis viewedas anindi-
cationofinterest inthe
personbeingaddressed. It
isalsoviewedasevidence
thatyouspeakwith
conviction.
124
Suggestions for the Field Ministry. When you share in the field
ministry, be friendly and warm as you approach people. Where ap-
propriate, use thought-provoking questions to start a conversation
on something that may be of mutual interest. As you do this, en-
deavor to establish eye contact—or at least to lookthe person in the
face in a respectful and kindly way. Awarm smile on the face ofone
whose eyes convey inner joy is very appealing. Such an expression
may tell the individual much about what sort of personyou are and
help him to feel more relaxed as you converse.
Observing the expression in the person’s eyes, where appropriate,
may give you indications as to how to deal with a situa-
tion.If the person is angryor if he is really not interested,
you may be able to see it. If he does not understand you,
you may realize that. If he is getting impatient, you will
usually be able to tell. If he is keenly interested, this too
will be evident. The expression in his eyes may alert you
to the need to adjust your pace, to make added effort to
involve him in the conversation, to terminate the discus-
sion or, possibly,to followthrough witha demonstration
of how to study the Bible.
Whether you are engaging inpublic witnessing or con-
ducting a home Bible study, endeavor to maintain re-
spectful eye contact with the one with whom you are
speaking. Do not stare at him, however, as that can be embarrass-
ing.(2Ki.8:11)Butinanatural,friendly manner,frequentlylookthe
other personintheface.In many lands, this conveys a feeling ofsin-
cereinterest.Ofcourse,whenyou arereadingfrom the Bibleorsome
other publication, your eyes will befocused ontheprinted page. But
to emphasize a point, you may want to look directly at the person,
though doing so briefly.If you lookup at intervals, this will also en-
ableyou to observe his reaction to what is being read.
If shyness makes visual contactdifficult for you atfirst,do notgive
up. With practice, appropriate visual contact will become natural,
anditmay addtoyoureffectivenessincommunicating withothers.
When Giving a Discourse. The Bible tells us that before Jesus be-
gan his Sermon on the Mount, “he lifted up his eyes upon his disci-
ples.” (Luke 6:20) Learn from his example. If you are going to speak
POINTS TO KEEP
IN MIND
Benaturalandfriendly,
genuinely interestedin
thosetowhom youspeak.
Whenreading,holdthe
readingmaterial inyour
handandkeepyour chin
upsothatyouneedto move
onlyyoureyes,notyour
head.
Visual Contact
125
before a group, face them and then pause a few seconds before you
start to talk. In many places this will include making eye contact
with some in the audience. This brief delay may help you to over-
comeyour initialnervousness.Itwillalsohelptheaudiencetoadjust
themselves to whatever attitude or emotion your face reveals. Addi-
tionally,your doing this will permittheaudienceto settle down and
be ready to give you their attention.
During your talk, look at the audience. Do not merely look at the
group as a whole. Endeavor to look at individuals in it. In almost
every culture, some degree of eye contact is expected on the part of
apublic speaker.
Looking at your audience means more than simply making a
rhythmic eye movement from one side to the other. Make respect-
ful visual contactwith someone in the audience, and if appropriate,
say a full sentence to that individual. Then look at another, and say
asentence or twoto that person. Do notlookatanyone so long that
he becomes uncomfortable, and do not concentrate on only a few
people in the entire audience. Continue to move your eyes through
the audience in this way, but as you speak to a person, really talk to
that one and notice his reaction beforeyou pass on to another.
Your notes should be on the speaker’s stand, in your hand, or in
your Bible so that you can glance at these with only an eye move-
ment. If it is necessary to move your entire head to see your notes,
audience contact will suffer. Consideration should be given both to
how often you look at your notes and to when you do so. If you are
lookingatyour notes while you arereachinga climaxinthetalk,not
only will you fail to see your audience’s reaction but your delivery
will lose some of its force.Likewise, if you are constantly consulting
your notes, you will lose audience contact.
When you throw a ball to someone, you look to see if it is caught.
Each thought in your talk is a separate “throw” to the audience. A
“catch”may be indicated by their response—anod, asmile,anatten-
tive look. If you maintain good visual contact, this can help you to
make surethat your ideas are being “caught.”
If you are assigned to read to the congregation, should you try to
lookat the audienceduring the reading? If theaudience is following
your reading in the Bible, most of them will not be aware of wheth-
126
Visual Contact
er you look up or not. But looking at your audience can help to in-
vigorate your reading because it will keep you keenly aware of their
reaction. And for any in the audience who are not using their Bibles
andwhoseminds maybewandering, visualcontactwith the speaker
may help bring their attention backtowhatis being read.Of course,
you will only be able to look up briefly, and it should not be done in
amanner that causes you to stumble in your reading. To that end, it
is best tohold your Bible in your hand and to keep your head up, not
with the chin dropped toward the chest.
At times, elders are called on to deliver a convention discourse
from a manuscript. Doing this effectively requires experience, care-
ful preparation, and much practice. Of course, use of a manuscript
limits visual contact with the audience. But if the speaker has pre-
pared well, he should be able to look at his audience from time to
time without losing his place.His doing so will help hold the atten-
tion of the audience and enable them to benefit fully from the im-
portantspiritual instruction being presented.
EXERCISE:
In everyday conversationwithfamily andfriends, endeavor to increase your
eyecontact withothers, doingso inwaysthatwill not offend local custom.
Visual Contact
127
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested