itextsharp pdf to image c# : Adding form fields to pdf files SDK control project winforms azure windows UWP be_E15-part1715

the questions that you raise are of genuine concern to them or not.
Evenwhenthesubjectis of interest totheaudience,their minds may
drift when you are reading texts that they have heard many times.
To prevent that from happening,you need togivethematterenough
thought to make your presentation appealing.
Present a Problem. You might present a problem and then direct
attention to a scripture that has a bearing on the solution. Do not
lead the audienceto expectmore than they will get.Oftena scripture
provides only part of the solution. However, you might
askthe audiencetoconsider,whileyou read thetext,what
guidance it does give for dealing with thesituation.
In a similar manner, you might state a principle of god-
ly conduct and then use a Bible account to illustrate the
wisdom of following it. Ifa scripturecontains two (or per-
haps more) specific points related to what is being dis-
cussed, some speakers askthe audienceto watch for these.
If a problem appears to betoo difficult for a particular au-
dience, you can stimulate thought by presenting several
possibilities and then allowing thetext and its application
to provide the answer.
Cite the Bible as the Authority. If you have already
aroused interest in your subject and stated one or more
views on someaspect of it,you mightintroduce ascriptureby simply
saying: “NotewhatGod’s Word states on this point.” This shows why
the material that you are going to read is authoritative.
Jehovahused suchmenas John,Luke, Paul,and Peter towrite por-
tions of the Bible.Butthey were only writers;Jehovah is the Author.
Especially when speaking to people who arenotstudents of theHoly
Scriptures, introducing a text by saying “Peter wrote” or “Paul said”
may not have the same force as an introduction that identifies the
text as the word of God. It is noteworthy that in certain instances,
Jehovah instructed Jeremiah to introduce proclamations by saying:
“Hear the word of Jehovah.” (Jer. 7:2; 17:20; 19:3; 22:2) Whether we
use Jehovah’s name in introducing scriptures or not, before we con-
clude ourdiscussion,we should endeavor to pointoutthatwhatis in
the Bible is his word.
Take the Context Into Account. You should be aware of the con-
text when deciding how to introduce a scripture. In some cases you
HOW TO DO IT
Whenselectingamethod
thatwillarouseinterest,
takeinto accountwhatyour
audiencealready knowsand
howtheyfeel aboutthe
subject.
Besurethatyouknowwhat
istobeaccomplishedby
eachtext, andlet your
introductory comments
reflect that.
148
Scriptures Effectively Introduced
Adding form fields to pdf files - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
can save pdf form data; change tab order in pdf form
Adding form fields to pdf files - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; create a pdf form
will directly mention the context; however, context may in other
ways influence what you say.For instance, would you introduce the
words of God-fearing Job in the same way that you would a state-
mentmadeby oneofhis falsecomforters? Thebookof Acts was writ-
ten by Luke, but he quotes, among others, James, Peter, Paul, Phil-
ip, Stephen,and angels,as well as Gamaliel and other Jews who were
notChristians.To whomwill you ascribethetextthatyou quote? Re-
member, for example, that not all of the psalms were composed by
Davidand notall of thebookofProverbs was writtenby Solomon.It
is alsobeneficial to knowwhowas being addressed by the Bible writ-
er and whatgeneral subject was being discussed.
Use Background Information. This is especially effective if you
can show that circumstances existing at the time of the Bible ac-
count were similar to those that you are discussing. In other in-
stances background informationis necessary inorder to understand
aparticular text. If you were to use Hebrews 9:12, 24 in a talk on
theransom, for example, you mightfinditnecessary to preface your
reading of the text with a brief explanation of the innermost room
of the tabernacle, which, the scripture indicates, pictures the place
Jesus entered when he ascended to heaven. But do not include so
muchbackground material that itovershadows thetext thatyou are
introducing.
To improve the way that you introduce scriptures, analyze what
experienced speakers do. Note the different methods that they use.
Analyze the effectiveness of these methods. In preparing your own
talks, identify the key scriptures, and give special thought to what
each text should accomplish. Carefully plan the introduction for
each one so that it will be used with the most telling effect. Later,
widen out to include all of the texts that you use. As this aspect of
your presentation improves, you will be focusing greater attention
on the Word ofGod.
EXERCISE:
Select a scripture that you believe you can use effectively in your territory.
Plan (1) what question or problem you will present to arouse anticipation
onthe partofthehouseholder and(2) how youwill focus attentiononyour
reason for reading the text.
Scriptures Effectively Introduced
149
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. and load PDF from other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
add date to pdf form; change font size pdf form
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET.
adding image to pdf form; add signature field to pdf
WHEN you speak to others about God’s purposes, whether private-
ly or from the platform,your discussion should center onwhatis in
God’s Word.This usually involves reading scriptures from the Bible,
which ought to be donewell.
Proper Emphasis Involves Feeling. Scriptures should beread with
feeling. Consider some examples. When you read Psalm
37:11aloud,your voice should conveyhappyanticipation
of the peace that is promised there.Whenyou read Reve-
lation 21:4 regarding the end of suffering and death,your
voiceshould reflectwarm appreciation for the marvelous
relief that is being foretold. Revelation 18:2, 4, 5, with its
appeal to getout of sin-laden “Babylon the Great,” ought
to be read with a tone of urgency. Of course, the feeling
expressed should be heartfeltbut not overdone. The proper amount
of emotionis determined by the textitself and by theway itis being
used.
Emphasize the Right Words. If your comments on a certainverse
are built around just a portion of it, you should highlight that por-
tion when reading the text. For example, when reading Matthew 6:
33, you would not give primary stress to “his righteousness” or to
“all these other things” if you intend to analyze what is meant by
“seeking first thekingdom.”
In a talk on the Service Meeting, you may plan to read Matthew
28:19.What words should you emphasize? If you want to encourage
diligence in starting home Bible studies, stress “make disciples.” On
the other hand, if you plan to discuss the Christian’s responsibility
to share Bible truth with an immigrant population or you want to
encourage certain publishers to serve where the need is greater, you
mightstress “people of all the nations.”
Frequently, a scripture is presented in answer to a question or in
support of an argument that others view as controversial. If every
65
SCRIPTURES READ
WITH PROPER EMPHASIS

What doyou need to do?
Emphasize words and expressions that highlight your line of
reasoning. Read with appropriate feeling.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Thefullforceofscriptures
thatarereadismadeto
standoutwithproper em-
phasis.
150
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting
create a fillable pdf form in word; add text field to pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature Create PDF Document from Existing Files Using C#.
add form fields to pdf online; change font in pdf fillable form
thought expressed in the text is emphasized equally, your audience
may fail to seetheconnection. Thepoint may be obvious to you but
notto them.
For example,when reading Psalm 83:18from a Bible that contains
the divine name, if you put all the emphasis on the expression “the
Most High,” a householder may fail to grasp the seemingly obvious
fact that God has a personal name. You should stress the name “Je-
hovah.” However, when you are using that same scripture in a dis-
cussion of Jehovah’s sovereignty, you should give prima-
ry emphasis to the expression “the Most High.” Likewise,
when using James 2:24 to show the importance of cou-
pling faith with action, giving primary emphasis to “de-
clared righteous”instead of to “works” mightcausesome
who hear you to miss the point.
Another helpful examplecanbe found at Romans 15:7-
13. This is partof a letter written by the apostle Paul to a
congregation made up of both Gentiles and natural Jews.
Here the apostle argues that the ministry of Christ bene-
fits not only circumcised Jews but also people of the na-
tions so that “the nations might glorify God for his mer-
cy.” Then Paul quotes four scriptures, drawing attention
to that opportunity for the nations.Howshould you read
those quotations in order to emphasize the point that
Paul had in mind? If you are marking expressions to
stress,you mighthighlight“thenations” inverse 9,“you nations” in
verse 10,“allyou nations”and “all the peoples”inverse 11,and “na-
tions” in verse 12. Try reading Romans 15:7-13 with that emphasis.
As you do so,Paul’s entire line of argument will become clearer and
easier to grasp.
Methods of Emphasis. The thought-carrying words thatyou want
to stand out may be stressed in a number of ways. The means that
you use should be in keeping with the scripture and the setting of
the talk. A few suggestions are offered here.
Voice stress. This involves any change in voice that makes the
thought-carrying words stand out from therestof the sentence.The
emphasis may beachieved by achangeinvolume—eitherby increas-
ing it or by decreasing it. In many languages, a change in pitch adds
HOW TO CULTIVATE THE
USE OF EMPHASIS
Regardingany scripturethat
youplantoread,askyour-
self:‘Whatfeelingor
emotiondo thesewords
express?HowshouldI
convey it?’
Analyzetextsthat youplan
to use.Regardingeachone,
ask yourself:‘Whatpurpose
willthistextserve?Which
wordsneedtobeempha-
sizedinorder to achieve
thatpurpose?’
Scriptures Read With Proper Emphasis
151
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete to insert, delete and update PDF form fields in C#
create a form in pdf from word; add submit button to pdf form
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
add it into the original PDF document to form a complete detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page
add jpg to pdf form; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
emphasis. In some languages, however, that may change the mean-
ing altogether. When a slower pace is used for key expressions, this
adds weighttothem.Inlanguages thatdo notpermit voicestress as a
means of emphasizing certain words,itwill benecessary to do what-
ever is customary in that language in order to obtain the desired re-
sults.
Pausing. This may be done before or after reading the key portion
of a scripture—or both.Pausing immediately before you read a main
thought creates anticipation; pausing afterward deepens the impres-
sionmade.However,iftherearetoomany pauses,nothing will stand
out.
Repetition. You can place emphasis on a particular point by inter-
rupting yourselfand rereading the word or phrase. Amethod that is
often preferable is to complete the text and then repeat the key ex-
pression.
Gestures.Bodymovementas well as facialexpressioncanoftenadd
emotion to aword or a phrase.
Tone of voice. In some languages, words may at times be read in a
tone that influences their meaning and sets them apart. Here, too,
discretion should be exercised, especially in using sarcasm.
When Others Read Texts. When a householder reads a scripture,
hemay stress the wrong words ornone atall. Whatcanyou dothen?
Generally it is best to makethemeaning clear by your application of
the texts. After making the application, you might focus special at-
tention directly on thethought-carrying words in theBible.
EXERCISES:
(1)Analyzeascripturethatyouplantouseinthefieldservice. Practiceread-
ing it with appropriate feeling. Having in mind the way that you plan to
use the text, read it aloud with emphasis on the correct word(s). (2) In a
current study publication, select one paragraph that contains quoted
scriptures. Analyze how the scriptures are being used. Mark the thought-
conveying words. Read the entire paragraph aloud in a manner that gives
proper emphasis to the scriptures.
152
Scriptures Read With Proper Emphasis
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page
allow saving of pdf form; adding form fields to pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
text character and text string to PDF files using online text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe
add photo to pdf form; best program to create pdf forms
WHEN teaching others, more is required than merely reading verses
from the Bible. The apostle Paul wrote to his associate Timothy: “Do
your utmost to present yourself approved to God, a workman with
nothing to be ashamed of, handling the word of the truth aright.”
—2Tim.2:15.
To do this means that our explanation of scriptures
must be consistent with what the Bible itself teaches.
This requires that we take into account the context, in-
stead of simply selecting expressions that appeal to us
and adding our own ideas. Through the prophet Jer-
emiah, Jehovah warned against those prophets who pro-
fessed to speak from the mouth of Jehovah but who actu-
ally presented “thevision of their own heart.” (Jer. 23:16)
The apostle Paul warned Christians against contaminat-
ing God’s Word withhumanphilosophies when hewrote:
“We have renounced the underhanded things of which
to be ashamed, not walking with cunning, neither adulterating the
word of God.” In those days dishonest wine merchants would dilute
their wine to make it go further and to bring in more money.We do
not adulterate the Word of God by mixing it with human philoso-
phies. “We are not peddlers of the word of God as many men are,”
Paul declared, “but as out of sincerity, yes, as sent from God, under
God’s view, in company with Christ, we are speaking.”—2 Cor. 2:17;
4:2.
At times, you may quote a scripture to highlight a principle. The
Bible is filled with principles that provide sound guidance in deal-
ing with awidevariety of situations. (2 Tim. 3:16,17) But you should
make surethat your application is accurate and that you are not mis-
using a scripture, making it appear to say what you want it to say.
66
SCRIPTURES CORRECTLY APPLIED

What doyou need to do?
Make sure that any application of a scripture is in harmony
with the context and with the Bible as a whole. The applica-
tion should also be in harmony with what has been pub-
lished by “the faithful and discreet slave.”
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Itisaseriousthingto teach
others God’sWord. Hiswill
isthatpeoplecometo “an
accurateknowledgeof
truth.”(1Tim.2:3, 4) That
imposes onustherespon-
sibilityto teachGod’sWord
correctly.
153
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change font pdf fillable form; create a pdf form in word
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Following are examples for adding password to a plain PDF passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file
adding signature to pdf form; convert pdf to editable form
(Ps.91:11,12; Matt.4:5, 6) Theapplication mustbe in harmony with
Jehovah’s purpose,consistent with the entire Word ofGod.
“Handling the word of the truth aright” also includes getting the
spiritofwhattheBible says.Itisnota“club”withwhichtobrowbeat
others.Religious teachers who opposed Jesus Christquoted from the
Scriptures, but they were shutting their eyes to the weightier mat-
ters—those involving justice and mercy and faithfulness—which are
required by God. (Matt. 22:23, 24; 23:23, 24) When teaching God’s
Word, Jesus reflected his Father’s personality. Jesus’ zeal
for the truth was coupled with his deep love for the peo-
ple hetaught.We should endeavor to followhis example.
—Matt.11:28.
How can we be sure that we are making proper appli-
cation of a scripture? Regular Bible reading will help. We
also need to appreciate Jehovah’s provision of “the faith-
ful and discreet slave,” the body of spirit-anointed Chris-
tians through whom he provides spiritual food for the
householdoffaith.(Matt.24:45)Personal study as wellas
regular attendance at and participation in congregation
meetings will help us to benefit from theinstruction pro-
vided through thatfaithful and discreet slave class.
If the bookReasoning From the Scriptures is available in
your language and you learn to use it well, you will have
at your fingertips the guidance that you need for correct
application of hundreds of scriptures that are frequently
used in our ministry. If you are planning to use an unfamiliar scrip-
ture,modesty will moveyou to doneededresearch sothatwhenyou
speak, you will behandling the word of the trutharight.—Prov.11:2.
Make the Application Clear. When teaching others, make sure
that they clearly see the connectionbetweenthesubjectthatyou are
discussingandthescriptures that you use.If you lead upto the scrip-
ture with a question, your listeners should see how the scripture an-
swers thatquestion. Ifyou are using thescriptureinsupportofsome
statement, be sure that the student clearly sees how the text proves
the point.
Just reading the scripture—even with emphasis—is usually not
enough. Remember, the average person is unfamiliar with the Bible
HOW TO DEVELOP
THE ABILITY
ReadtheBibleregularly.
Carefully studyTheWatch-
tower, andpreparewellfor
congregationmeetings.
Besurethatyouknowthe
meaningofthewordsinany
scripturethatyouplanto
use.Readthetextcarefully
sothatyoucorrectly under-
standwhatit issaying.
Makeit apracticetodo
researchinourChristian
publications.
154
Scriptures Correctly Applied
and will probably not grasp your point with just one reading. Draw
attention to the portion of the text that directly applies to what you
are discussing.
This usually requires that you isolate key words, those that have a
direct bearing on the point being discussed. The simplest method is
to restate those thought-carrying words. If you are talking to an in-
dividual,you might ask questions that will help him to identify the
key words. When talking to a group,some speakers prefer to achieve
their objective by using synonyms or by restating the idea. However,
if you choose to do this, exercise care that the audience does not
lose sightof theconnection between the pointof discussionand the
wording in the scripture.
Having isolated the key words, you have laid a good foundation.
Nowfollowthrough.Did you introducethescripturewith aclear in-
dication as to your reason for using the text? Ifso,pointout how the
wordsthatyouhavehighlighted relatetowhatyou led your audience
to expect. State clearly what that connection is. Even if you did not
use such an explicit introduction to the text,there ought to be some
follow-through.
The Pharisees asked Jesus what they thought was a difficult ques-
tion,namely: “Is itlawful for a man to divorce his wife on every sort
ofground?” Jesus based his reply on Genesis 2:24.Notice thathefo-
cused attention on just one part of it, and then he made the need-
ed application. Having pointed out that the man and his wife be-
come “one flesh,” Jesus concluded: “Therefore, what God has yoked
togetherlet no manput apart.”—Matt.19:3-6.
How much explanation should you give in order to make the ap-
plication of a scripture clear? The makeup of your audience and the
importance of the point being discussed should determine that. Let
simplicity and directness beyour aim.
Reason From the Scriptures. Regarding the apostle Paul’s minis-
try in Thessalonica, Acts 17:2, 3 tells us that he ‘reasoned from the
Scriptures.’ This is an ability that every servant of Jehovah should
try to cultivate.For example, Paul related facts regarding the lifeand
ministryofJesus,showedthatthesehad beenforetold in the Hebrew
Scriptures,andthengaveaforceful conclusionby saying:“This is the
Christ,this Jesus whom I am publishing to you.”
Scriptures Correctly Applied
155
When writing to the Hebrews, Paul repeatedly quoted from the
Hebrew Scriptures. To emphasize or clarify a point, he often iso-
lated one word or a short phrase and then showed its significance.
(Heb. 12:26, 27) In the account found in Hebrews chapter 3, Paul
quoted from Psalm 95:7-11. Notice that he then enlarged on three
portions of it: (1) the reference to the heart (Heb. 3:8-12), (2) the
significance of the expression “Today” (Heb. 3:7,13-15; 4:6-11), and
(3)themeaning of thestatement:“Theyshall notenter into my rest”
(Heb. 3:11,18, 19; 4:1-11). Endeavor to imitate that example as you
make application of each scripture.
Observe the effectiveness with which Jesus reasoned from the
Scriptures in the account found at Luke 10:25-37. A man versed in
the Law asked: “Teacher, by doing what shall I inherit everlasting
life?” In reply Jesus first invited the man to express his view of the
matter, and then Jesus emphasized the importance of doing what
God’s Word says. When it became clear that the man was missing
the point, Jesus discussed at lengthjust one word from the scripture
—“neighbor.”Instead ofsimply defining it,he usedan illustrationto
help the mancome to the proper conclusion himself.
It is evident that when answering questions, Jesus did not sim-
ply quote texts that gave a direct, obvious answer. He analyzed what
these said and then made application to the question at hand.
When the resurrection hope was being challenged by the Saddu-
cees, Jesus focused attention on one specific portion of Exodus 3:6.
But he did not stop after quoting the scripture. He reasoned on it
to showclearly that the resurrection is partofGod’s purpose.—Mark
12:24-27.
Mastering the ability to reason correctly and effectively from the
Scriptures will be a significant factor in your becoming a skilled
teacher.
EXERCISE:
Reason on the meaning of 2 Peter 3:7. Does it prove that the earth will be
destroyed by fire? (When defining “earth,” also consider what is meant by
“heavens.” What scriptures show that “earth” can be used in a figurative
sense? Who or what is actually destroyed, as stated in verse 7? How does
that agree with what occurred in Noah’s day, which is referred to in vers-
es 5 and 6?)
156
Scriptures Correctly Applied
WHETHER you are speaking to anindividual or to alarger audience,
it is unwise to assume that your listener(s) will be interested in your
subject just because you are interested in it. Your message is impor-
tant,butifyoufail to makeclear its practicalvalue,you will probably
not hold theinterest of your audience very long.
This is trueof even aKingdom Hall audience.They may
mentally tune in when you use an illustration or experi-
ence that they have not heard before. But they may tune
out when you talk about things they already know, espe-
cially ifyou fail tobuildonthosethings.You need to help
them seewhy and how whatyou aresaying is ofreal ben-
efitto them.
The Bible encourages us to think in practical terms.
(Prov.3:21) Jehovah used John the Baptizer to direct peo-
ple to “the practical wisdom of righteous ones.” (Luke 1:
17) This is wisdom that is rooted in wholesome fear of Jehovah. (Ps.
111:10) Those who appreciate this wisdom are helped to cope suc-
cessfully withlifenowand to lay hold on the real life,theeternal life
to come.—1 Tim. 4:8; 6:19.
Making a Talk Practical. If your talk is going to be practical, you
must give careful thoughtnotonly to the material but also to the au-
dience.Do not thinkof them merely as a group.That group is made
up of individuals and families. There may be very young ones,teen-
agers, adults, and some who are elderly.Theremaybenewly interest-
ed ones as well as those who began serving Jehovah beforeyou were
born. Some may be spiritually mature; others may still be strongly
influenced by certain attitudes and practices of the world. Ask your-
self: ‘How might the material I am going to discuss benefit those in
the audience? How can I help them to get the point?’ You may de-
cide to giveprincipal attentionto justone or two of the groups men-
tioned here.However,do not completely forget the others.
67
PRACTICAL VALUE MADE CLEAR

What doyou need to do?
Help your audience to see how your subject affects their lives
or can be used by them in a beneficial way.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Ifpeopledonot seethe
practicalvalueofwhatyou
aresaying, theymaytell
youthatthey arenotinter-
ested,or theymaytune
out mentally,allowingtheir
minds towander.
157
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested