Thenheexplained thatCaesar’s things should bepaid backto Caesar
but that God’s things should be paid back to God. (Matt. 22:19-21)
To teach alessoninhonoring God withall that wehave,Jesus point-
ed out a poor widow at the temple whose contribution—two small
coins—was her whole means of living. (Luke 21:1-4) On another oc-
casion he used a young child as an example of being humble, free
from ambition. (Matt. 18:2-6) He also personally demonstrated the
meaning of humility by washing his disciples’ feet.—John
13:14.
Ways to Employ Visual Aids. Unlike Jehovah, we
cannot communicate by means of visions. Yet, many
thought-provoking pictures appear in the publications of
Jehovah’s Witnesses. Use them to help interested people
visualize the earthly Paradise, promised in God’s Word.
On a home Bible study,you might draw a student’s atten-
tion to a picture that is related to what you are studying
andask him to tell you what he sees. It is noteworthy that
when certain visions were given to the prophet Amos, Je-
hovah asked: “What are you seeing, Amos?” (Amos 7:7, 8;
8:1, 2) You can ask similar questions as you direct the at-
tentionof peopleto pictures that aredesignedas visual teaching aids.
If you write out mathematical calculations or use a time line that
shows a sequence of significant events, this can help people to un-
derstand more readily such prophecies as the “seven times” of Dan-
iel 4:16 and the “seventy weeks” of Daniel 9:24. Such visual aids ap-
pear in several of our study publications.
In your family Bible study, discussion of such things as the taber-
nacle,thetempleinJerusalem,and Ezekiel’s visionary templecan be
made easier to understand if you use a picture or a diagram. These
can be found in Insight on the Scriptures, the appendix of the New
World Translation oftheHolyScriptures—With References,andvarious
issues of The Watchtower.
When reading the Bible withyour family,make good useof maps.
Trace Abraham’s journey from Ur to Haran and down to Bethel. Ex-
amine the route taken by Israel as the nation leftEgypt and traveled
to the Promised Land. Locatethe area given to eachtribe ofIsrael as
an inheritance. Observe the extent of the domain of Solomon. Fol-
low Elijah’s routeas hefled from Jezreel all theway tothewilderness
EFFECTIVE VISUAL
AIDS . . .
Shouldhighlight orclarify
thingsthatdeservespecial
emphasis.
Shouldhaveinstructionas
their primaryobjective.
Shouldbeclearly visibleto
theentireaudienceifused
ontheplatform.
248
Effective Use of Visual Aids
Pdf editable fields - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
add signature field to pdf; pdf form save
Pdf editable fields - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
pdf form creator; create a pdf form in word
beyond Beer-sheba after being threatened by Jezebel. (1 Ki. 18:46–
19:4) Locate the cities and towns where Jesus preached. Follow the
travels of Paul, as described in the book of Acts.
Visual aids are useful when acquainting Bible students with the
functions of the congregation.You mightshowyourstudenta print-
ed program and explain the kind of information that we discuss at
assemblies and conventions.Many have been impressed with a per-
sonal tour of the Kingdom Hall or by a tour of a branch office of Je-
hovah’s Witnesses.Thiscanbe aneffectiveway ofclearing away mis-
conceptions about our work and its purpose. When giving a tour of
the Kingdom Hall, indicate how it differs from other places of wor-
ship. Highlight themodest learning environment. Pointout the fea-
tures especially designed forour publicministry—literature distribu-
tion areas, territory maps, and contribution boxes (as opposed to
collectionplates).
Wherevideos prepared under thedirectionof the Governing Body
are available, use these to build confidence in the Bible, to acquaint
students with the activity of Jehovah’s Witnesses, and to encourage
viewers to live in harmony with Bible principles.
Using VisualAids for LargerGroups. When well prepared and ca-
pably presented, visual aids can be effective teaching aids for larger
groups.Such visualaids areprovided in various forms by the faithful
and discreet slave class.
Study material in The Watchtower usually includes visual aids in
the form of artworkthatcan be used by the conductor to emphasize
important points. This is also true of publications used at the Con-
gregation Book Study.
Someoutlines for publictalks may seem to lend themselves to the
use of visual aids to illustrate points. However, the greater good is
usually accomplished by focusing attention on what is in the Bible,
which most in the audience will have in their hands. If on occasion
apicture or a briefoutline of mainpoints is necessary to conveyone
or several mainpoints of a talk, checkin advance to be sure that the
visual aid can be clearly seen (or read) from the backof the meeting
place.Such devices should be used sparingly.
Our objective in using visual aids when speaking and teaching is
not to entertain. When a dignified visual aid is used, it should give
Effective Use of Visual Aids
249
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
add forms to pdf; changing font size in a pdf form
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load
chrome save pdf with fields; add text field pdf
visual reinforcement to ideas that deserve special emphasis. Such
aids serve a useful purpose when they help to clarify the spoken
word, making it easier to understand, or when they provide strong
evidence of the validity of what is said. Properly used, an apt visual
aid may make such a deep impression that both the visual aid and
the pointof instruction are remembered for many years.
The ability to hear and the senseof sightboth play important roles
inlearning.Rememberhowthesesenses havebeenusedby thegreat-
estTeachers,and strivetoimitatetheminyour efforts toreach others.
To build appreciation for
Jehovah’s organization










To teach certain Bible
truths to a child










EXERCISE:
List below visual aids that youmight use . . .
250
Effective Use of Visual Aids
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
hardly edit PDF document. Under this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word document.
cannot save pdf form; add attachment to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text
create a form in pdf; cannot edit pdf form
WE ARE grateful for the changes that God’s Word has broughtabout
in our lives, and we want others to benefit as well. Furthermore, we
realize that how peoplerespond to the goodnews will affecttheir fu-
ture prospects. (Matt. 7:13,14; John 12:48) We earnestly want them
to acceptthetruth.However,ourstrong convictions andzeal need to
be coupled with discernment in order to accomplish the
most good.
Ablunt statement of truth that exposes as false a cher-
ishedbeliefofanotherperson,evenwhenbuttressedwith
the recitation of a long list of Scripture texts, is general-
ly not well received. For example, if popular celebrations
are simply denounced as being of pagan origin, this may
not change how other people feel about them. A reason-
ing approachis usually more successful.Whatis involved
in being reasonable?
TheScriptures tellus that“thewisdom fromaboveis ...
peaceable, reasonable.” (Jas. 3:17) The Greek word here
rendered “reasonable” literally means “yielding.” Some translations
render it “considerate,” “gentle,” or “forbearing.” Notice that rea-
sonableness is associated with peaceableness. AtTitus 3:2, it is men-
tioned along withmildness and is contrasted with belligerence. Phi-
lippians 4:5urges us to be known for our “reasonableness.”A person
who is reasonable takes into account the background, circumstanc-
es, and feelings of the one to whom he is talking. He is willing to
yield when it is appropriate to do so. Dealing with others in such a
way helps to open their minds and hearts so that they are more re-
ceptivewhenwe reason with them from the Scriptures.
Where to Begin. The historian Luke reports that when the apos-
tlePaul was inThessalonica, he used the Scriptures, “explaining and
proving by references that it was necessary for the Christ to suffer
8<
REASONING MANNER

What doyou need to do?
Use scriptures, illustrations, and questions in a logical way
and in a manner that encourages people to listen and to
think.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Ablunt,dogmaticapproach
tendstocloseminds and
hearts.Areasoningmanner
encouragesdiscussion,
givespeoplesomethingto
thinkaboutlater, andleaves
thewayopenfor futurecon-
versations.Itcanbepower-
fullypersuasive.
251
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
can save pdf form data; cannot save pdf form in reader
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
adding an image to a pdf form; pdf form save in reader
and to rise from the dead.” (Acts 17:2, 3) It is noteworthy that Paul
did this in a Jewishsynagogue. Those to whom he was speaking rec-
ognized the Hebrew Scriptures as an authority.Itwas appropriate to
startwith something that they accepted.
When Paul was speaking to Greeks at the Areopagus in Athens, he
did not begin with references to the Scriptures. Instead,
he started with things that they knew and accepted, and
he used these to lead them to a consideration of the Cre-
ator and His purposes.—Acts 17:22-31.
In modern times, there are billions who do not recog-
nizetheBibleas an authority in their lives. But the life of
nearly everyone is affected by harshsituations inthepres-
entsystem of things. Peoplelong for something better.If
you first show concern for what disturbs them and then
show how the Bible explains it, such a reasonable ap-
proach might move them to listen to what the Bible says
about God’s purpose for humankind.
It may bethat the heritagepassed on to a Bible student
by his parents included certain religious beliefs and cus-
toms. Now, the student learns that those beliefs and cus-
toms are not pleasing to God, and he rejects them in fa-
vor of what is taught in the Bible. How can the student
explain that decision to his parents? They may feel that
by rejecting the religious heritagethey gave him, he is re-
jecting them. The Bible studentmay concludethatbefore
trying to explain fromtheBiblethebasis forhis decision,
hewill need to reassure his parents ofhis loveand respect
for them.
When to Yield. Jehovah himself, though having full
authority to command, shows outstanding reasonable-
ness. When rescuing Lot and his family from Sodom, Je-
hovah’s angels urged: “Escape to the mountainous region for fear
you may be swept away!” Yet, Lot pleaded: “Not that, please, Jeho-
vah!” He begged to be permitted to flee to Zoar. Jehovah showed
consideration for Lot by allowing him to do that; so when other cit-
ies were destroyed, Zoar was spared. Later, however, Lot followed Je-
hovah’s original direction and moved to the mountainous region.
HOW TO DO IT
Whendecidinghowto
beginyourdiscussion,
takeinto accountthe
backgroundandattitude
ofyourlisteners.
Donot challengeevery
wrongstatement.
Speakwithconviction, but
recognizethatothershave
thefreedomto choosewhat
theywillbelieve, just as
youdo.
Insteadofansweringques-
tionsquickly,useother
questionsor illustrationsto
helptheinquirer toreason
onthematter.
Makeit ahabitto reason
onascripturebyexplain-
ingkey expressions,show-
inghowthecontext or
other scripturesshedlight
onthemeaning, orusingan
exampletoshowhowthe
scriptureapplies.
252
Reasoning Manner
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents
best pdf form creator; add text fields to pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual Basic .NET class
pdf form change font size; add fields to pdf
(Gen.19:17-30) Jehovahknew thathis way was right,buthepatient-
ly showed consideration while Lot cameto appreciate it.
In order to deal successfully with others, we too need to be rea-
sonable. We may be convinced that the other person is wrong, and
we may have in mind powerful arguments that would prove it. But
at times it is better not to press the matter. Reasonableness does not
mean compromising Jehovah’s standards.It may simply be better to
thank the other person for expressing himself or to let some wrong
statements pass unchallenged so that you can focus the discussion
onsomething thatwill accomplish moregood.Evenif he condemns
what you believe, do not overreact. You might ask him why he feels
ashedoes.Listencarefullyto his reply.This will giveyou insightinto
his thinking.Itmay also lay the groundworkforconstructiveconver-
sation at a future time.—Prov.16:23; 19:11.
Jehovah has endowed humans with the ability to choose. He al-
lows them to usethat ability, even though they may not use it wise-
ly. As Jehovah’s spokesman, Joshua recounted God’s dealings with
Israel. But then he said: “Now if it is bad in your eyes to serve Jeho-
vah, choose for yourselves today whom you will serve, whether the
gods that your forefathers who were on the other side of the River
served or the gods of the Amorites in whose land you are dwelling.
But as for meand my household, we shall serve Jehovah.”(Josh. 24:
15) Our assignment today is to give “a witness,” and we speak with
conviction,but wedo not try to pressure others to believe.(Matt.24:
14) They must choose, and we do not deny them that right.
Ask Questions.Jesus setanoutstandingexampleinreasoning with
people.Hetookintoaccounttheirbackground andused illustrations
that they would readily accept. He also made effective use of ques-
tions. This gave others opportunity to express themselves and re-
vealedwhatwas intheirhearts.Italso encouraged them toreason on
the matter being considered.
Aman versed in the Lawasked Jesus:“Teacher,by doing what shall
Iinherit everlasting life?” Jesus could easily have given him the an-
swer. But he invited the man to express himself. “What is written in
theLaw? How do you read?”Theman answered correctly. Did his giv-
ing a correctanswer end thatdiscussion? Not at all. Jesus letthe man
continue, and a question that the man himself asked indicated that
he wastrying to provehimself righteous.Heasked:“Whoreally is my
Reasoning Manner
253
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET control to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB. Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF.
changing font in pdf form; pdf form save with reader
neighbor?”Rather thangivea definition,which the man might have
disputed because of the prevailing Jewish attitude toward Gentiles
and Samaritans, Jesus invited him to reason onan illustration. It was
about a neighborly Samaritan who came to the aid of a traveler that
had been robbed and beaten, whereas a priest and a Levite did not.
With a simple question, Jesus made sure that the man got the point.
Jesus’ manner of reasoning made the expression “neighbor” take on
ameaning that this man had never before discerned.(Luke 10:25-37)
Whata fine exampleto imitate! Insteadofdoing all thetalking your-
self,ineffect,thinking for your householder, learnhowto usetactful
questions and illustrations to encourage yourlistener to think.
Give Reasons. When the apostle Paul spoke in the synagogue in
Thessalonica, he did more than read from an authority that his au-
dience accepted. Luke reports that Paul explained,proved, and made
application of what he read. As a result, “some of them became be-
lievers and associated themselves with Paul and Silas.”—Acts 17:1-4.
Regardless of who may be in your audience, such a reasoning ap-
proach can be beneficial. That is true when you witness to relatives,
speak to workmates or schoolmates, talk to strangers in your public
witnessing, conduct a Bible study, or give a talkin the congregation.
Whenyou read a scripture, the meaning may be plain to you butper-
haps not so to someone else. Your explanation or your application
may sound like dogmatic assertion. Would isolating and explaining
certain key expressions in thescripture help? Could you present sup-
porting evidence, possibly from the context or from another scrip-
ture that deals with the subject? Might an illustration demonstrate
thereasonableness ofwhatyouhavesaid? Would questions help your
audience to reason on the matter? Such a reasoning approach leaves
afavorable impression and gives others much to think about.
EXERCISES:
(1) After you witness to someone who has strong views, analyze the way
that you handled the discussion. What evidence did you present? What il-
lustrationdidyouinclude? What questionsdid youuse? Howdid youshow
considerationfor his backgroundor feelings?If unableto do thisinthe field
service, try itinapractice sessionwithanother publisher. (2) Rehearsehow
you would reason with someone (a peer or a child) who has in mind do-
ing something that is wrong.
254
Reasoning Manner
WHENyou makea statement,your listeners are fully justified in ask-
ing:“Whyisthattrue? Whatis theproofthatwhatthespeaker is say-
ing should be accepted?”As a teacher,you havetheobligationeither
to answer such questions or to help your listeners find the answers.
If the point is crucial toyour argument,makesure that you giveyour
listeners strong reasons to accept it. This will contribute
to making your presentationpersuasive.
The apostle Paul used persuasion. By sound argument,
logical reasoning, and earnest entreaty, he sought to
bring aboutachange ofmindinthosetowhom hespoke.
He set a fine example for us. (Acts 18:4; 19:8) Of course,
some orators use persuasionto mislead people.(Matt. 27:
20; Acts 14:19; Col. 2:4) They may start with a wrong
premise, rely on biased sources, use superficial arguments, ignore
facts that disagree with their view, or appeal more to emotion than
to reason. We should be careful to avoid all such methods.
Based Firmly on God’s Word. What we teach must not be of our
own originality. We endeavor to share with others what we have
learned from the Bible. In this, we have been greatly helped by the
publications of the faithful and discreet slave class. These publica-
tionsencourageustoexaminethe Scripturescarefully.Inturn,wedi-
rectotherstotheBible,notwiththegoalofproving thatweareright,
but with the humble desire of letting them see for themselves what
it says. We agree with Jesus Christ, who said in prayer to his Father:
“Your word is truth.” (John17:17)Thereis no greater authority than
JehovahGod,theCreator ofheavenand earth.The soundness of our
arguments depends on their being based on his Word.
Attimes you may speakto people who are notfamiliar withthe Bi-
ble or who do not recognize it as the Word of God. You should ex-
ercise good judgment as to when and how you bring in Bible texts.
8=
SOUND ARGUMENTS GIVEN

What doyou need to do?
Provide satisfying evidence to support statements that you
make.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Your listeners will notbe-
lieveor actonwhat yousay
unless theyareconvinced
thatitis true.
255
But you should endeavor to direct their attention to that authorita-
tive source of information as soon as possible.
Should you conclude that simply quoting a relevantscripture pro-
vides an irrefutable argument? Not necessarily. You may need to di-
rect attention to the context to show that the scripture truly does
support what you are saying. If you are merely drawing a princi-
ple from ascriptureand thecontextis not discussing that
subject, more evidence may be needed. You may need to
use other scriptures that bear on the matter in order to
satisfy your audience that what you are saying is really
solidly based on the Scriptures.
Avoid overstating what a scripture proves. Read it care-
fully.The text may deal with the general subject that you
are discussing. Yet, for your argument to be persuasive,
your listener must beableto see init what you are saying
that it proves.
Supported byCorroborativeEvidence.Insomecases,it
may behelpfulto use evidencefrom areliablesource out-
sideof theBibletohelp peopleappreciate thereasonable-
ness of theScriptures.
For example, you may point to the visible universe as proof that
there is a Creator. You may draw attention to natural laws, such as
gravity, and reason that the existence of such laws presupposes that
there is a Lawgiver. Your logic will be sound if it is in harmony with
whatis stated in God’s Word.(Job38:31-33; Ps.19:1;104:24;Rom.1:
20) Such evidence is helpful because it demonstrates that what the
Bible says is consistent withobservable facts.
Are you endeavoring to help someone realize that the Bible real-
ly is the Word of God? You might quote scholars who say that it is,
but does that prove it? Such quotations merely help people who re-
spect those scholars.Could you use science to prove that the Bible is
true? If you were to use the opinions of imperfect scientists as your
authority,you wouldbebuilding onashaky foundation.On theoth-
erhand,ifyou startwiththeWord ofGodandthenpointtofindings
ofsciencethathighlighttheBible’s accuracy,yourarguments will be
established on a sound foundation.
Whatever you are endeavoring to prove, present sufficient evi-
HOW TO DO IT
Insteadofmerelymaking
assertions, supplysatisfying
evidenceto supportimpor-
tantpoints.
Baseargumentsfirmlyon
theScriptures.
Usecorroborativeevidence
tofityourobjectivesandthe
needs ofyouraudience.
256
Sound Arguments Given
dence. The amount of evidence required will depend on your audi-
ence. For example, if you are discussing the last days as described at
2Timothy 3:1-5, you may draw the attention of your audience to a
well-known news report indicating thatmen have “no natural affec-
tion.”Thatone example may beadequate to provethatthis aspectof
the sign of the last days is now being fulfilled.
An analogy—a comparison of two things that have important ele-
ments incommon—can oftenbehelpful.The analogy does notinit-
self prove a matter;its validity must betested against what the Bible
itself says. But the analogy may help a person to see the reasonable-
ness of an idea. Such an analogy might be used, for instance, when
explaining that God’s Kingdom is a government. You might point
out that like human governments, God’s Kingdom has rulers, sub-
jects, laws, a judicial system,and an educational system.
Real-life experiences can often be used to demonstrate the wis-
dom of applying the Bible’s counsel. Personal experiences can also
be used to support statements made. For instance, when you point
out to a person the importance of reading and studying the Bible,
you mightexplainhowdoingthathas improvedyourlife.To encour-
age his brothers, the apostle Peter referred to the transfiguration, of
which he was an eyewitness. (2 Pet.1:16-18) Paul too cited his own
experiences. (2 Cor. 1:8-10; 12:7-9) Of course, you should use your
personal experiences sparingly so that you do notdraw undueatten-
tion to yourself.
Since people differ in background and thinking, evidence that
convinces one person may not satisfy another. Therefore, consider
the views of your listeners when deciding which arguments you will
useandhowyou will presentthem.Proverbs 16:23states:“The heart
of the wise one causes his mouth to show insight, and to his lips it
adds persuasiveness.”
EXERCISES:
(1) Turn to the main heading “Jesus Christ” in Reasoning From the Scrip-
tures. Notice how questions are answered with primary emphasis on the
Bible. (2) Examine the opening series of articles in an issue of The
Watchtower or Awake!Select several of themainpoints that aredeveloped.
Underscore the key scriptures, and mark the corroborative evidence.
Sound Arguments Given
257
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested