itextsharp pdf to image c# : Adding images to pdf forms SDK control API wpf azure windows sharepoint big-data-and-data-protection3-part1740

Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
30 
Overseas transfers 
96.
This paper focusses on the requirements of the DPA and the EU 
Data Protection Directive
48
. However, big data analytics may 
often be carried out internationally, with processing being done 
outside the EU. This may also be the case if the big data 
processing is done in the cloud. The eighth principle of the DPA 
restricts the transfer of personal data outside the European 
Economic Area. This issue of overseas transfers of personal 
data is a complex one and we have not discussed it in this 
paper, but general guidance on this is available in our Guide to 
data protection
49
, which in turn links to more detailed guidance 
documents. 
97.
Our guidance document on cloud computing covers the 
international transfer issues raised by this technology
50
Tools for compliance 
98.
In the previous sections we have discussed a number of key 
data protection issues in relation to big data. We now turn to 
some of the tools that can help to ensure that processing 
complies with data protection principles and that people’s data 
privacy rights are respected. 
Privacy impact assessments (PIAs) 
99.
Big data analytics can involve novel, complex and sometimes 
unexpected uses of personal data. In that context, in order to 
establish whether the processing is fair, it is particularly 
important to assess, before processing begins, to what extent it 
is likely to affect the individuals whose data is being used. The 
48
Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 
October 1995 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of 
personal data and on the free movement of such data. http://eur-
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:31995L0046:EN:HTML 
Accessed 25 June 2014 
49
49
Information Commissioner’s Office. Guide to data protection. ICO, November 
2009. 
http://ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/~/media/documents/library/
Data_Protection/Practical_application/the_guide_to_data_protection.pdf Accessed 
25 June 2014 
50
Information Commissioner’s Office. Guidance on the use of cloud computing. 
ICO, October 2012. 
http://ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/topic_guides/online/~/media/
documents/library/Data_Protection/Practical_application/cloud_computing_guidan
ce_for_organisations.ashx Accessed 25 June 2014 
Adding images to pdf forms - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
add date to pdf form; pdf fillable form creator
Adding images to pdf forms - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
add fillable fields to pdf online; add photo to pdf form
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
31 
tool to use for this analysis is a privacy impact assessment. Our 
code of practice on Conducting privacy impact assessments
51
gives practical advice on how to do this, and it links the privacy 
impact assessment to standard risk management 
methodologies. 
100.
Assessing privacy risk involves being clear at the outset about 
the benefits and aims of the big data project, as well as the 
impact on individuals’ privacy. In many cases, the benefits in 
question are benefits to the organisation that is proposing to 
process the personal data, but it is important to factor in also 
benefits that may accrue to individuals or to society more 
broadly. When solutions to mitigate privacy risk have been 
identified, it is necessary to assess whether the final impact on 
those individuals, after those solutions have been applied, is 
proportionate to the aims of the project. Polonetsky and Tene 
have suggested parameters for assessing the potential benefits 
of big data projects
52
in particular. 
101.
It will be important that a range of people of involved in big 
data projects understand PIAs.  The organisation’s data 
protection officer may need to co-ordinate the process but 
other staff, such as data scientists, need to understand how to 
apply PIA techniques to their work.  For a PIA to be effective in 
a big data environment those who have the technical expertise 
in designing and applying algorithms must have an 
understanding of privacy impact.   
Privacy by design 
102.
The balance between the benefits of a project and the 
protection of privacy should not be seen as a zero-sum game, 
in which more of one means less of the other; there can be a 
positive sum
53
. To put is another way, it needn’t be a case of 
the benefits of big data inevitably coming at the cost of a loss 
51
Information Commissioner’s Office. Conducting privacy impact assessments 
code of practice. ICO February 2014, 
http://ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/topic_guides/~/media/docum
ents/library/Data_Protection/Practical_application/pia-code-of-practice-final-
draft.pdf Accessed 25 June 2014 
52
Polonetsky, Julius and Tene, Omer Privacy and big data. Making ends meet. 66 
Stanford Law Review Online 25 3 September 2013. 
http://www.stanfordlawreview.org/online/privacy-and-big-data/privacy-and-big-
data Accessed 25 June 2014 
53
Cavoukian, Ann and Jonas, Jeff. Privacy by design in the age of big data. 
Information and Privacy Commissioner, Ontario, Canada June 2012. 
http://www.ipc.on.ca/images/Resources/pbd-big_data.pdf Accessed 25 June 
2014 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from PDF page(s) to current target PDF document in server-side application and Windows Forms project using a
can save pdf form data; change font in pdf fillable form
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
add signature field to pdf; adding form fields to pdf
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
32 
of privacy. If a privacy risk is identified, then this can be an 
opportunity to find creative technical solutions that can deliver 
the real benefits of the project while protecting privacy. 
103.
Privacy by design solutions can involve not only anonymisation 
techniques but a range of both technical and organisational 
measures. These include access controls and audit logs, data 
minimisation, data segregation and purpose limitation and 
separation. These are intended to protect privacy by mitigating 
the risk of re-identification and the risk of data misuse. Further 
information on privacy by design principles and solutions is 
available from the Office of the Information and Privacy 
Commissioner of Ontario, Canada
54
104.
The privacy by design approach is about finding ways to build 
privacy controls into systems from the start. Cavoukian and 
Jonas have argued that is possible to “bake in” privacy–
enhancing technologies at the outset when planning big data 
projects
55
, while Tene and Polonetsky
56
discuss ways of 
obscuring the identity of individuals in a dataset. A further 
approach is to record individuals’ preferences and corporate 
rules within the metadata that accompanies that data
57
. Mayer 
and Narayanan refer to solutions that mitigate a risk to privacy 
as ‘privacy substitutes’
58
. These are essentially ways of carrying 
out transactions that only require the collection and storage of 
the minimum information that is actually needed to validate a 
customer or complete a transaction. 
54
http://www.privacybydesign.ca/ Accessed 18 July 2014 
55
Cavoukian, Ann and Jonas, Jeff. Privacy by design in the age of big data. 
Information and Privacy Commissioner, Ontario, Canada June 2012. 
http://www.ipc.on.ca/images/Resources/pbd-big_data.pdf Accessed 25 June 
2014 
56
Tene, Omer and Polonetsky, Jules. Judged by the tin man: individual rights in 
the age of big data. 15 August 2013 Journal of Telecommunications and High 
Technology Law, Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2311040 Accessed 
25 June 2014 
57
Nguyen, Caroline et al. A user-centred approach to the data dilemma: context, 
architecture and policy. In Digital Enlightenment Yearbook 2013 –The value of 
personal data. Digital Enlightenment Forum September 2013. 
http://www.digitalenlightenment.org/publication/def-yearbook-2013-value-
personal-data Accessed 25 June 2014 
58
Mayer, Jonathan and Narayanan, Arvind. Privacy substitutes. 66 Stanford Law 
Review Online 89 3 September 2013. 
http://www.stanfordlawreview.org/online/privacy-and-big-data/privacy-
substitutes Accesed 25 June 2014 
VB.NET Image: Adding Line Annotation to Images with VB.NET Doc
full sample codes for printing line annotation on images. Basic .NET sample codes for adding a line System.Text Imports System.Windows.Forms Imports RasterEdge
pdf form save; add form fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server-side application and .NET Windows Forms. Support adding PDF page number.
can reader edit pdf forms; changing font size in a pdf form
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
33 
Transparency and privacy information 
105.
We have noted already that the complexity of big data 
analytics can mean that the processing appears opaque to 
citizens and consumers whose data is being used. It may not 
be apparent to them their data is being collected, for example 
their mobile phone location, or how it is being processed, for 
example when their search results are filtered based on an 
algorithm (the so called “filter bubble” effect
59
). Similarly, it 
may be unclear how decisions are being made about them, 
such as credit scoring. This opacity can lead to a lack of trust 
that can affect people’s perceptions of, and engagement with, 
the organisation doing the processing. We return to the issue of 
building trust in the section on The business context
106.
Organisations carrying out big data analytics therefore need to 
think about promoting transparency at an early stage. The DPA 
contains a specific transparency requirement, in the form of a 
‘fair processing notice’, or more simply a privacy notice. This is 
where the organisation tells people what it is going to do with 
their data when it collects it. It should state the identity of the 
organisation collecting the data, the purposes for which they 
intend to process it and any other information that needs to be 
given to enable the processing to be fair.  Our Privacy notices 
code of practice
60
explains this further with practical examples. 
107.
If an organisation buys in personal data from another 
organisation in order to use it for big data analytics, then it also 
needs to ensure that the original privacy notice that was given 
to the individuals by the seller covers this further use of the 
data. If it does not, then the buyer will need to give the 
individuals concerned its own privacy notice, making clear the 
new purpose for which the data is going to be processed, and 
give them an opportunity to opt out. 
59
Pariser, Eli. Beware online “filter bubbles”. TED Talk, March 2011. 
http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles/transcript 
Accessed 18 July 2014 
60
Information Commissioner’s Office. Privacy notices code of practice. ICO, 
December 2010. 
http://ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/topic_guides/~/media/docum
ents/library/Data_Protection/Detailed_specialist_guides/PRIVACY_NOTICES_COP_
FINAL.ashx Accessed 25 June 2014 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create PDF from Jpeg, png, images.
pdf form maker; build pdf forms
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
PDF page in many ways, like adding rectangle, line view, annotate, process, save and scan images (supporting JPEG and BMP) and document files (TIFF, PDF and Word
add jpg to pdf form; add forms to pdf
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
34 
108.
It is sometimes suggested
61
that it is not feasible to give 
privacy notices in relation to big data analytics. This is argued 
on a number of grounds: 
 People are unwilling to read lengthy privacy notices. When 
they want to download an app or purchase something on 
line they simply tick “I agree” without reading the 
conditions. This is often linked to the view that people are 
becoming less concerned about the use made of their 
data, particularly in view of the fact that they share more 
and more information about themselves on social media. 
The analytics used in big data, including complex 
algorithms, are too difficult to explain in simple terms. 
Given that big data analytics often involves repurposing 
data, it is not possible to foresee at the outset all the uses 
that may be made of the data. 
We will discuss each of these arguments. 
- Not reading privacy notices 
109.
The fact that people very often do not read privacy notices 
does not necessarily mean that they are unconcerned about 
how their data will be used. It may also indicate that they do 
not expect, from previous experience, that the privacy notice 
will give them useful information in an understandable form. 
The fact that there are poorly written privacy notices does not 
remove the responsibility on organisations to explain to 
customers what they are doing. Rather, it challenges them to 
be as innovative in this area as they are in their analytics, and 
to find new ways of conveying information concisely. Channel 
4’s use of a YouTube video
62
to accompany their privacy notice 
is an example of an innovative approach. 
110.
This is not to underestimate the growing challenges of 
providing privacy notices, in a context where the methods of 
collecting personal data are changing. A recent OECD 
roundtable
63
discussed a proposal for a new way of classifying 
61
Eg Rubinstein, Ira S Big data. The end of privacy or a new beginning? 
International Data Privacy Law 25 January 2013. 
http://idpl.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2013/01/24/idpl.ips036.full.pdf+html 
Accessed 25 June 2014 
62
Channel 4 website http://www.channel4.com/4viewers/ Accessed 25 June 2014 
63
OECD Working party on Privacy and Security in the Digital Economy. Summary 
of the OECD privacy expert roundtable. Protecting privacy in a data-driven 
C# Image: Document Image Ellipse Annotation Creating and Adding
on color, bitional and black & white images; annotation shape to image - support adding rubber stamp powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change font pdf form; create a form in pdf from word
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
After adding WinViewer DLL into Visual Studio Toolbox, you link to see more C# PDF imaging project converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
change font on pdf form; best pdf form creator
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
35 
personal data, based on how the data originated. This 
taxonomy distinguishes between provided, observed, derived 
and inferred data: 
 Provided data is consciously given by individuals, eg when 
filling in an online form. 
Observed data is recorded automatically, eg by online 
cookies or sensors or CCTV linked to facial recognition. 
Derived data is produced from other data eg calculating 
customer profitability from the number of visits to a store 
and items purchased. 
Inferred data is produced by using analytics to find 
correlations between datasets and using these to 
categorise or profile people eg calculating credit scores or 
predicting future health outcomes. 
111.
Big data increasingly uses observed, derived and inferred, 
rather than provided data. This can be problematic in terms of 
providing privacy information, because individuals may be 
unaware that this data is being collected and processed, and 
the processing may be done by organisations that are not 
directly customer-facing. However, this does not remove the 
need for transparency; it is even more important because the 
processing is not obvious to the individuals concerned. The 
issue is finding the point at which to communicate this 
information and the most effective way to do it. 
112.
Privacy information does not need to be provided by just one 
method; a combination and mix can be used. Innovation will be 
needed to support different types of data collection. This will 
need to include consideration of in-product and just-in-time 
notices. There is also a strong case to consider at an early 
stage how this information will be provided, eg the relationship 
between usability and privacy by design
64
113.
Furthermore, research suggests that the view that people are 
unconcerned about the use of their personal data is too 
economy: taking stock of current thinking. OECD, May 2014. 
http://www.oecd.org/officialdocuments/publicdisplaydocumentpdf/?cote=dsti/iccp
/reg%282014%293&doclanguage=en Accessed 1 July 2014 
64
Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario. Privacy by Design 
and User Interfaces.  http://www.ipc.on.ca/images/Resources/pbd-user-
interfaces_Yahoo.pdf Accessed 26 June 2014 
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
chrome pdf save form data; add form fields to pdf without acrobat
VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
at the page level, like TIFF page adding & deleting controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and more
change font size in pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
36 
simplistic. Research commissioned by the International 
Institute of Communications
65
shows that people’s willingness 
to give personal data, and their attitude to how that data will 
be used, is context-specific. That context depends on a number 
of variables, eg how far an individual trusts the organisation, 
what information is being asked for, etc. Furthermore, people 
use various strategies to protect their privacy when giving their 
personal data. The Boston Consulting Group
66
found that for 
75% of consumers in most countries, the privacy of personal 
data remains a top issue, and that young people aged 18-24 
are only slightly less cautious about the use of personal online 
data than older age groups. 
- Complex algorithms 
114.
The view that it is too hard to explain the algorithms perhaps 
stems from a misunderstanding of the purpose of a privacy 
notice. The DPA does not require the privacy notice to describe 
how the data is processed (ie the technical details of how the 
algorithms work), but the purposes for which it is processed. 
The DPA is also clear that processing cannot be fair if people 
are deceived or misled about those purposes
67
- Unforeseen purposes 
115.
If there is a problem about privacy notices in a big data 
context, it is not really about the complexity of the analytics 
but rather about uses of their data that individuals concerned 
would not expect. The ability to analyse data for different 
purposes, such as using the location of mobile phones to plot 
movements of people or traffic is an important characteristic - 
and a benefit - of big data analytics. If an organisation has 
collected personal data for one purpose and then starts to use 
that personal data for a completely different purpose, it needs 
to update its privacy notice accordingly and ensure that people 
are aware of this. Furthermore, the idea that in a big data 
context it is not possible to tell people about the possible uses 
of their data needs to be challenged. In general terms, big data 
65
International Institute of Communications. Personal data management: the 
user’s perspective. International Institute of Communications, September 2012. 
http://www.iicom.org/open-access-resources/doc_details/226-personal-data-
management-the-users-perspective Accessed 25 June 2014 
66
Rose, John et al. The trust advantage: how to win with big data. Boston 
Consulting Group November 2013. 
https://www.bcgperspectives.com/content/articles/information_technology_strate
gy_consumer_products_trust_advantage_win_big_data/ Accessed 25 June 2014 
67
Data Protection Act 1998 Schedule I Part II  
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
37 
analytics allows data to be used in innovative ways, but this 
does not mean that an organisation cannot foresee what use it 
is going to make of that data, and tell people about it. 
116.
If what was originally personal data is being used in an 
anonymised form, this does not necessarily mean that the 
organisation can ignore this when it is writing a privacy notice. 
Given the complexity of big data analytics, the processing is 
potentially opaque, and it may not be readily apparent to 
people whether their personal data is being used. It may 
therefore be helpful in particular cases not only to tell people 
what is being done with their personal data, but also to tell 
them when their personal data is not being used, ie if the data 
is anonymised for analysis. This helps to dispel some of the 
mystery surrounding big data, and this openness may help to 
build trust in the analytics. 
EU General Data Protection Regulation 
117.
The proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation
68
contains 
a number of provisions that would have a bearing on the use of 
personal data in big data analytics. We have published our 
detailed comments
69
on the proposed Regulation elsewhere, 
here we draw out some specific points relevant to big data.  In 
particular, these points relate to: data minimisation and the 
anonymised data; an onus on data controllers to justify the 
processing; the need for transparency; building in data 
protection by design and default; a shift in the balance of 
power; and a possible extension of data protection duties to 
organisations outside the EU. 
118.
The principle of data minimisation and the need for 
organisations to justify their processing of personal data 
emerge strongly in the proposed regulation. Personal data 
must be “limited to the minimum necessary in relation to the 
purposes for which they are processed” and shall only be 
68
European Commission. Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament 
and of the Council on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing 
of personal data and on the free movement of such data (General Data Protection 
Regulation) COM(2012) 11 final. European Commission. 25 January 2012 
http://ec.europa.eu/justice/data-
protection/document/review2012/com_2012_11_en.pdf Accessed 25 June 2014 
69
Information Commissioner. Proposed new EU Data  Protection Regulation: 
article-by-article analysis paper. ICO, February 2013. 
http://ico.org.uk/news/~/media/documents/library/Data_Protection/Research_an
d_reports/ico_proposed_dp_regulation_analysis_paper_20130212_pdf.ashx 
Accessed 25 June 2014 
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
38 
processed “if and as long as the purposes could not be fulfilled 
by processing information that does not involve personal 
data”(article 5 (c)). Similarly, personal data must be “kept in a 
form which permits identification of data subjects for no longer 
than is necessary for the purposes for which the  personal data 
are processed”. Furthermore, the ‘right to be forgotten’ under 
article 17 means that data subjects can obtain the erasure of 
personal data if it is no longer necessary for the purposes for 
which they were collected or processed. The recent judgment 
of the European Court of Justice in the case of Google Spain
70
made under the current Directive (which the DPA implements), 
also supports this direction of travel. 
119.
This challenges the idea that personal data can be collected 
and stored in case it might be useful in some future analysis. 
Instead, organisations would have to justify why they are 
collecting and holding personal data. Furthermore, these 
provisions would encourage them to use anonymised data for 
the analytics unless it is necessary to use data that identifies 
individuals. 
120.
The Regulation places a notable emphasis on transparency. We 
have already discussed the need for organisations carrying out 
big data analytics to be as transparent as possible, including 
the role of privacy notices, in the section on Transparency and 
privacy information. Under the proposed Regulation, the data 
controller would need “transparent and easily accessible 
policies” on processing personal data, and communicate with 
data subjects in “an intelligible form, using clear and plain 
language, adapted to the data subject” (article 11).  We expect 
this provision would mean that, where big data analytics 
involve novel or unexpected processing, data controllers should 
actively alert people to this. The privacy notice would also be 
expected to contain more detail than at present, including how 
long the personal data will be stored and whether the data 
controller intends to transfer the personal data outside the 
European Economic Area (article 14). However, it remains to 
be seen how practicable it would be to communicate all of the 
stipulated information in some of the contexts in which big data 
is gathered. 
70
Google Spain SL and Google Inc v Agencia Espaňola de Protección de Datos 
and González C-131/12. 
http://curia.europa.eu/juris/document/document.jsf?text=&docid=152065&pageI
ndex=0&doclang=en&mode=lst&dir=&occ=first&part=1&cid=243691 Accessed 
25 June 2014 
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
39 
121.
The Regulation also proposes practical measures to protect 
privacy rights. It includes a specific requirement to build in 
“data protection by design and default” (article 23). Data 
controllers would have to implement mechanisms to ensure 
that throughout the analytics only the minimum amount of 
personal data is used and is kept no longer than needed for the 
processing. They would also have to carry out a privacy impact 
assessment (article 33). This reflects some of the 
developments we have noted in the section on Tools for 
compliance and they have an important role in trying to ensure 
that the processing of personal data in the analytics is not 
unfair, excessive or unwarranted. In terms of practical 
measures, the Regulation also refers to data portability and to 
certification, which we discuss further in the section on The role 
of third parties
122.
Big data is sometimes characterised as a power relationship 
that favours corporations and governments
71
. The Regulation 
suggests a desire to shift the balance of power in favour of the 
individual by giving them more explicit rights over the 
processing of their personal data. The individual would have a 
right to object to processing carried out for certain purposes 
(article 19) and the right not to be subject to automated 
profiling which has “legal effects” on them or “significantly 
affects” them (article 20). What constitutes a significant effect 
is open to question, but these provisions are potentially 
relevant to the processing of personal data in big data 
analytics. 
123.
This desire is also reflected in the provisions dealing with 
consent as a condition for processing personal data. Under 
article 7, consent cannot provide a legal basis for the 
processing where there is a “significant imbalance” between the 
position of the data controller and that of the data subject. This 
supports the requirement that consent must be freely given 
(article 4), but it is arguable that an imbalance would not 
necessarily mean that people cannot give genuine consent. 
124.
The Regulation would also extend the scope of data protection 
to apply to data controllers outside the EU that are processing 
the personal data of people in the EU, if the processing relates 
to offering them goods or services or monitoring their 
behaviour (article 3).  In principle this could extend the scope 
71
Richards, Neil M and King, Jonathan Three paradoxes of big data 66 Stanford 
Law Review Online 41 3 September 2013 
http://www.stanfordlawreview.org/online/privacy-and-big-data/three-paradoxes-
big-data Accessed 25 June 2014 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested