itextsharp pdf to image converter c# : Adding text field to pdf control Library system azure asp.net wpf console 201019pap2-part366

We specify the set of nominal yields as Y
N
t
= fy
N
t;¿
i
g
7
i=1
,and the set of TIPS yields as
Y
T
t
= fy
T
t;¿
i
g
3
i=1
,and collect in y
t
all data used in the estimation, including the log price
level q
t
,all nominal yields Y
N
t
,all TIPS yields Y
T
t
,and 6 month-ahead, 12 month-ahead, and
long-horizon forecasts of future 3-month nominal yield:
y
t
=[q
t
;Y
N
t
;Y
T
t
;f
t;6m
;f
t;12m
;f
t;long
]
0
:
(48)
We assumethat all nominal and TIPS yields and survey forecastsof nominal short rate are
observed with error. The observation equation therefore takes the form
y
t
=A + Bx
t
+e
t
(49)
where
A=
2
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
0
A
N
~a +A
T
a
f
6m
a
f
12m
a
f
long
3
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
5
; B =
2
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
1
0
0
0 B
N0
0
0 B
T0
~
b
0
0 b
f0
6m
0
0 b
f0
12m
0
0 b
f0
long
0
3
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
5
; e
t
=
2
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
0
e
N
t
e
T
t
e
f
t;6m
e
f
t;12m
e
f
t;long
3
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
5
;
(50)
in which A
i
and B
i
,i = N;T collect thenominal and TIPS yield loadings on x
t
,respectively,
in obvious ways, and ~a and
~
bcollects the TIPS yield loadings on the independent liquidity
factor ~x
t
.We assume a simple i.i.d. structure for the measurement errors so that
e
N
t;¿
i
»N(0;–
2
N;¿
i
); e
T
t;¿
i
»N(0;–
2
T;¿0
i
); e
f
t;¿
i
»N(0;–
2
f;¿
i
)
(51)
Based on the state equation (46) and the observation equation (49), it is straightforward
to implement the Kalman-filter and perform the maximum likelihood estimation. The details
are given in Appendix C. Two aspects are worth noting here: first, the log price level q
t
is
nonstationary, so we use a diffuse prior for q
t
when initializing the Kalman filter. Second,
inflation, survey forecast and TIPS yields are not available for all dates, which introduces
missing data in the observation equation and are handled in the standard way by allowing the
dimensions of the matrices A and B in Equation (49) to be time-dependent (see, for example,
Harvey (1989, sec. 3.4.7)).
Note that all four versions of our models can be accommodated in the above setup. To
implement Model NL without the liquidity premium, onesimply set ~° = 0 and ° = 0
3£1
,and
18
Adding text field to pdf - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
best pdf form creator; add submit button to pdf form
Adding text field to pdf - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
pdf form save; pdf form save in reader
fix ~„, ~•,
~
0
and
~
1
at arbitrary values as those variables do not enter thelikelihood function of
Model NL. To implement Model L-I with the independent liquidity factor only, one would fix
°= 0
3£1
.
To facilitate the estimation and also to make the results easily replicable, we follow the
following steps in estimating all our models:
1. We first perform a “pre”-estimation where a set of preliminary estimates of the param-
eters governing the nominal term structure is obtained using nominal yields and survey
forecasts of 3-month T-bill yield alone.
2. Based on these estimates and data on nominal yields, we can obtain a preliminary esti-
mate of the state variables, x
t
.
3. A regression of the monthly inflation onto estimates of x
t
obtained in the second step
gives a preliminary set of estimates of the parameters governing the inflation dynamics.
4. Finally, these preliminary estimates are used as starting values in the full, one-step esti-
mation of all model parameters.
5 Empirical Results
In this Section, we discuss and compare the empirical performance of the various Models. As
we shall see, there are notable differences between the model equating TIPS yields with the
true real yields (Model NL) and the models that allow the two sets of yields to differ by a
liquidity premium component (Models L-I, L-II and L-IId).
5.1 Parameter Estimates and Overall Fit
Parameter Estimates
Table 3 reports the parameter estimates for all four models. Four things are worth noting
here: First, estimates of parameters governing the nominal term structure are almost identical
across the three models; under our set-up, these parameters seem to be fairly robustly esti-
mated. In particular, all estimations uncover a very persistent factor with a half life of about
19
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
changing font size in pdf form; pdf fillable form creator
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Multifunctional Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library supports adding text content to features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
change font size in fillable pdf form; can reader edit pdf forms
13 years. Note also that all four models exhibit a similar fit to nominal yields and survey
forecasts of nominal short-term interest rates. For example, the nominal yield fitting errors
(–
N;¿
)are fairly small in all four models: except for the 3-month yield which has –
N
of about
10 basis points, other maturity yields have –
N
of 5 basis points or less.
Second, therearenotabledifferences in theestimatesof parameters governing the expected
inflation process. In particular, the loading of the instantaneous inflation on thesecond and the
most persistent factor is negligible in the model without a TIPS liquidity factor (Model NL)
but becomes positive and significant in the three models with a TIPS liquidity factor (Models
L-I, L-II and L-IId). As a result, the monthly autocorrelation of one-year-ahead inflation
expectation is about 0.9 in Model NL but above 0.99 in all other models. As we will see later,
the lack ofpersistence in theinflation expectation process prevents Model NL from generating
meaningful variations in longer-term inflation expectations as we observe in the data.
Third, parameter estimates for the TIPS liquidity factor process are significant in both
Models L-I and L-II and assume similar values. The estimated market price of liquidity risk
carries the expected negativesign, as onewould generally expect any deterioration of liquidity
conditions to occur during bad economic times. In Models L-II and L-IId, the loading of the
instantaneous TIPS liquidity premium on each of the three state variables, °, is estimated to
be indistinguishable from zero; however, a Wald test shows that they are jointly significant.
Finally, the fit to TIPS yieldsaresignificantly better in models with a TIPS liquidity factor,
as can be seen from the smaller estimates of the standard deviations of TIPS measurement
errors. For example, for the 10-year TIPS, the fitting errors from the L-I and L-II models are
6basis points, while the fitting error from Model NL is 35 basis points. The fitting errors are
found to have a substantial serial correlation. For example, in the case of the 5-year TIPS,
we obtain a weekly AR(1) coefficient of 0.96, 0.91, and 0.91 for Model NL, L-I model, and
L-II model, respectively. The finding of serial correlation in term structure fitting errors are
however a fairly common phenomenon, and have been noted by Chen and Scott (1993) and
others.
[Insert Table 3 about here.]
Overall Fit
Panel A of Table4 reports some test statistics that compare the overall fit of the threemod-
20
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
pdf form creator; add form fields to pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
change font pdf fillable form; add fillable fields to pdf online
els. We first report two information criteria commonly used for model selection, the Akaike
Information Criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Both information
criteria are minimized by the most general model, Model L-IId.
We also report results from likelihood ratio (LR) tests of the three restricted models, Mod-
els NL, L-I and L-II, against their more general counterparts, Model L-I, L-II and L-IId, re-
spectively. Compared to Model L-I, Model NL imposes the restriction ~° = 0. The standard
likelihood ratio test does not apply here because the nuisance parameters, ~•, ~„,
~
0
and
~
1
,are
not identified under the null (Model NL) and appear only under the alternative (Model L-I).
26
Here we follow Garcia and Perron (1996) and calculate a conservative upper bound for the
significance of the likelihood ratio test statistic as suggested by Davies (1987). In particular,
denote by µ the vector of nuisanceparameters of size s, and definethelikelihood ratio statistic
as a function of µ:
LR (µ) = 2[logL
1
(µ)¡ log L
0
];
where L
1
(µ) is the likelihood value of the alternative model for any admissible values of the
nuisance parameters µ 2 ›, and L
0
is the maximized likelihood value of the null model. For
an estimated LR value of M, Davies (1987) derives an upper bound for its significance as
Pr
sup
µ2›
LR (µ) > M
<Pr[LR (µ) > M]+ V M
1
2
(s¡1)
exp
¡(M=2)
2
¡s=2
¡(s=2)
where ¡(:) represents the Gamma function and V is defined as
V =
Z
@LR(µ)
dµ:
Garcia and Perron (1996) further assumes that thelikelihood ratio statistic hasa single peak at
b
µ, which reduces V to 2M
1
2
.Apply this procedure to testing the null of Model NL against the
alternative of Model L-I gives an estimate of the maximal p value of essentially zero, hence
Model NL is overwhelmingly rejected in favor of Model L-I. With the LR statistic estimated
as ¡2 log [L(NL)=L(L¡I)] = 4617:67 with 1 degree of freedom, we feel confident that using
alternative econometric procedures to deal with thenuisance parameter problem is unlikely to
overturn the rejection.
The LR test of Model L-I against Model L-II, on the other hand, is fairly standard. Based
on the likelihood estimates of the two models, we obtain a LR statistic of
¡2log [L(L¡I)=L(L¡II)] = 8:6;
26Fordiscussionsontestingwithnuisanceparameters,see,forexample,Davies(1977,1987,2002)andAn-
drews and Ploberger (1994,1995).
21
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
change pdf to fillable form; change font size in pdf form
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add form fields to pdf; edit pdf form
and are able to reject Model L-I in favor of Model L-II at the 5% level based on a ´
2
3
distribu-
tion.
Finally, Model L-II isrejected in favor ofthefull model, Model L-IId, based on the Davies
(1987) procedure, with a large LR test value of 433.41.
[Insert Table 4 about here.]
5.2 Fitting TIPS Yields and TIPS Breakeven Inflation
Theestimated standard deviationsof TIPS measurement errorsreported in theprevioussection
suggest that Model NL has trouble fitting the TIPS yields. This section looks at thefit of TIPS
yields and TIPS breakeven inflation across models in more details.
The three left (right) panels ofFigures 5 plot the actual and the model-implied TIPS yields
(TIPS breakeven inflation) based on Models NL, L-I and L-IId, respectively, together with the
real yields (the true breakeven inflation) as implied by the three models.
27
By construction,
the model-implied TIPS yields and the model-implied real yields coincide under Model NL.
The top left panel of Figures 5 shows that, according to Model NL, the downward path
of 10-year TIPS yields from 1999 to 2004 is part of a broader decline in real yields since
the early 1990’s, with real yields estimated to have come down from a level as high as 7%
in the early 90’s to about 2% around 2003. During the same period, the 10-year nominal
yield declined from around 9% to a little over 4%. Therefore, Model NL attributes the decline
of 10-year nominal yield entirely to a lower real yield, leaving little room for lower inflation
expectation orlower inflation risk premiums. While thereissomeempirical evidence suggest-
ing that long-term inflation expectations may have edged down during this period,
28
it is hard
to imagine economic mechanisms that would generate such a large decline in long-term real
yields. Furthermore, although Model NL matches the general trend of TIPS yields during this
period, it has problem fitting the time variations, frequently resulting in large fitting errors. In
contrast, the decline in real yields as implied by Models L-I and L-IId, plotted in the middle
27
Model-implied true breakevens are calculated asthe difference between model-implied nominal yields and
model-implied real yields of comparable maturities. Model-implied values are calculated using smoothed esti-
matesof the state variables. Resultsfor Model L-II are similar to those forModel L-IId and are not reported.
28
See Kozicki and Tinsley (2006),for example.
22
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add fields to pdf; add signature field to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
allow users to save pdf form; changing font in pdf form
and the bottom left panels, is less pronounced and more gradual. With the flexibility brought
by the additional liquidity premium factor, these two models are also able to fit TIPS yields
almost perfectly.
The problem with Model NL can be further seen by looking at the model-implied 10-year
breakeven inflation, as shown in the upper right panel of Figures 5. The 10-year breakeven
rate implied by Model NL, which by construction should equal the 10-year TIPS breakeven
inflation, appearstoo smooth compared to its data counterpartand missesmostof the short-run
variations in theactual series. The poor fitting of the TIPS breakeven inflation rates highlights
the difficulty that the 3-factor model has in fitting nominal and TIPS yields simultaneously.
29
In contrast, the 10-year breakeven inflation rates implied by Models L-I and L-IId, shown in
the middle and bottom left panels, show substantial variations that roughly match those of
the actual TIPS breakeven inflation rate. In particular, the model-implied and the TIPS-based
breakeven inflation rates peak locally at the beginning of 2000, in the middle of 2001 and
2002, and so on, and the magnitude of their variation are also similar. In these two models,
the gap between the model-implied and the TIPS-based breakeven inflation rates is thesum of
TIPS liquidity premium and TIPS measurement errors.
To quantify the improvement in terms of the model fit, Panels B and C of Table 4 provide
three goodness-of-fit statistics for TIPS yields at the 5-, 7- and 10-year maturities and TIPS
breakeven inflation at the 7- and 10-year maturities, respectively. The first statistic, CORR,
is simply the sample correlation between the fitted series and its data counterpart. Consistent
with the visual impression from Figure 5, allowing a TIPS liquidity premium component
improves the model fit for raw TIPS yields and even more so for TIPS breakeven inflation,
with the correlation between model-implied 10-year TIPS breakeven and the data counterpart
rising from 32% to over 90% once we move from Model NL to the other models. The next
two statistics are based on one-step-ahead model prediction errors from the Kalman Filter, v
t
,
defined in Equation (C-15) in Appendix C, and are designed to capture how well each model
can explain thedatawithoutresorting to largeexogenous shocks or measurement errors. More
specifically, the second statistic is the root mean squared prediction errors (RMSE), and the
third statistic is the coefficient of determination (R
2
), defined as the percentage of in-sample
29
Given the flexible nature of latent-factor model used in this paper,it ispossible that there may exist another
local maximum of the likelihood function underwhich the TIPS yieldsare fitted better,producing a closer match
between the model-implied and the TIPS-based breakeven inflation rates. However, such a fit would certainly
come at the expense of otherundesirable featuresof the model.
23
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET.
create a fillable pdf form in word; create pdf forms
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add forms to pdf; create a pdf form online
variations of each data series explained by the model:
R
2
=1 ¡
P
T
t=2
v
2
t
P
T
t=2
(y
t
¡
y)
2
;
(52)
where y
t
is the observed series and
ydenotes its sample mean.
30
As we can see from Panels
Band C of Table 4, based on these two metrics, the improvement moving from Model NL to
models with a liquidity factor is notable even for TIPS yields. In other words, the seemingly
reasonable fit of Model NL for raw TIPS yields is only achieved by assuming large exogenous
shocks to the state variables. The fit of Model NL for TIPS breakevens is even worse, with a
R
2
of ¡18:12% at the 10-year maturity. In comparison, all other models with aTIPS liquidity
factor explain more than 88% of the time variations of TIPS breakevens at both maturities.
[Insert Figure 5 about here.]
5.3 Matching Survey Inflation Forecasts
It is conceivable that a model with more parameters like Model L-IId could generate smaller
in-samplefitting errors for variables whosefit is explicitly optimized, but produce undesirable
implications for variables not used in the estimation. To check this possibility, we examine
the model fit for a variable that is not used in our estimation but is of enormous economic
interest, the expected inflation. In particular, we examine how closely the model-implied
inflation expectations mimic survey-based inflation forecasts. Ang, Bekaert, and Wei (2007)
recently provide evidence that survey inflation forecasts outperforms various other measures
of inflation expectations in predicting future inflation. In addition, survey inflation forecast
has the benefit of being a real-time, model-free measure, and hence not subject to model
estimation errors or look-ahead biases that could affect measures based on in-sample fitting of
realized inflation.
31
30
Unlike in a regression setting, a negative value of R
2
could arise because the model expectation and the
prediction errorsare not guaranteed to be orthogonal in a small sample.
31
Alternatively, we could compare the out-of-sample forecasting performance of various models. However,
we doubt the usefulness of such an exercise for two reasons. First, the sample available for carrying out such
an exercise is extremely limited due to the relatively short sample of TIPS. In addition, the large idiosyncratic
fluctuations associated with commonly used price indices would lead to substantial sampling variability in any
metric of forecast performance we use and further complicate the inference problem.
24
Panel D ofTable4 reportsthethreegoodness-of-fit statistics, CORR, RMSE and R
2
,for 1-
and 10-year ahead inflation forecasts from the SPF. Among the models, Model NL generates
inflation expectations that agree least well with survey inflation forecasts, producing large
RMSEs and small R
2
statistics at both horizons. This poor fit is especially prominent at the
1-year horizon: the RMSE is large, the correlation between the model and survey forecast is
essentially 0, and the R
2
ishighly negativeat ¡52%. In contrast, all other models, which have
aliquidity factor, generate a reasonable fit with the survey forecasts at both horizons. The
best fit is achieved by Models L-II and L-IId, both of which generate correlations above 80%
and small RMSEs at both horizons and explain a large amount of sample variations in survey
inflation forecasts. Models L-II and L-IId also improve notably upon Model L-I, suggesting
that some cyclical variations in TIPS yields might not be due to movements in the real yields.
Overall, Model L-IId doesnot seemto sufferfrom an overfitting problem. Aswewillseefrom
later sections, this model also generate sensible implications for TIPS liquidity premiums and
inflation risk premiums, further supporting our conclusion.
Avisual comparison of the model-implied inflation expectations and survey forecasts can
help us understand the results in Table 4. The left panels of Figure 6 plot the 1-year infla-
tion expectation based on Models NL, L-I and L-IId, together with the survey forecast. It can
be seen that the Model-NL-implied 1-year inflation expectation contains a large amount of
short-run fluctuations that are not shared by its survey counterpart. It also fails to capture the
downward trend in survey inflation forecasts during much of the sample period. In compari-
son, implied 1-year inflation expectation based on the other models show a visible downward
trend, consistent with the survey evidence. It is interesting that although Models L-I and L-IId
exhibit similar fit to TIPS yields and TIPS breakevens, as can be seen from Figure 5, they are
more differentiable based on their implications for inflation expectations. In particular, while
the 1-year inflation expectation implied by ModelL-IId bearsa high resemblance to the1-year
survey forecast, the same series implied by Model L-I appears to be much more variable than
the survey counterpart.
It is also not surprising that Model NL produces a larger RMSEs for 10-year inflation
expectations than the L-I and L-II models: the upper middle panel of Figure 6 shows that
Model NL completely misses the downward trend in the 10-year survey inflation forecast
since the early 1990s and implies a 10-year inflation expectations that moved little over the
sample period. This is the flip side of the discussions in Section 5.2, where we see a Model-
25
NL-implied 10-year real rate that is too variable and is used by the model to explain the entire
decline in nominal yields in the 1990s. Overall, the near-constancy of the long-term inflation
expectation is the most problematic feature of Model NL. Models L-I and L-IId, on the other
hand, produce 10-year inflation expectations that are clearly downward trending, though the
model-implied values are a bit lower than the survey forecast in the early 1990s, as shown in
the two lower panels in the middle column of Figure 6. As can be recalled from Figure 5, the
long-term real yields in these models also display a downward trend, but a much weaker one
compared to that in Model NL.
Finally, the three right panels of Figure 6 plot the model-implied inflation risk premiums
at the 1- and 10-year horizons for the three models under consideration. One immediately
notable feature is that Model-NL implies an inflation risk premium, shown in the upper right
panel, that is negative and increasing over time in the 1990-2007 period. In contrast, as men-
tioned in Section 2, most of the existing studies not using TIPS find that average inflation risk
premium has been positive historically. Furthermore, studies such as Clarida and Friedman
(1984) indicate that the inflation risk premium likely was positive and substantial in the early
1980s and probably has come down since then. As can be seen from Figure 7, which plots
the 10-year inflation risk premium estimates together with the 95% confidence bands for the
three models, even after we take into account sampling uncertainties, long-term inflation risk
premiums implied by Model NL remain negative over most of the sample period. In compar-
ison, the two models that allow for a liquidity premium, Models L-I and L-IId, both generate
10-year inflation risk premiums that are positive and fluctuate in the 0 to 1% range over the
same sample period. The short-term inflation risk premiums implied by these two models, on
the other hand, are fairly small, consistent with our intuition.
[Insert Figure 6 about here.]
[Insert Figure 7 about here.]
5.4 Summary
In summary, we find that Model NL, which equates TIPS yields with true underlying real
yields, fares poorly along a number of dimensions, including generating a poor fit with the
TIPS data as well as unreasonable implications for inflation expectations and inflation risk
26
premiums. This underscores the need to take into account a liquidity premium in modeling
TIPS yields. In contrast, models that allows for a TIPS liquidity premium, Models L-I and L-
II, improves upon Model NL in all three aspects and in particular produce long-term inflation
expectations that agree quite well with survey forecasts.
Among models allowing aliquidity premium in TIPS yields, Models L-II and ModelL-IId
generate short-term inflation expectations that matches survey counterparts better than Model
L-I, suggesting itisimportantto allow fora systematiccomponent in TIPS liquidity premiums.
Finally, alikelihood ratio testrejects Models L-IIin favor ofour preferred model, Model L-
IId, which features a deterministic trend in TIPS liquidity premium that isdesigned to capture
the “newness effect” during the early years of TIPS. In the remainder of our analysis we’ll be
mainly focusing on this model.
6 TIPS Liquidity Premium
6.1 Model Estimates of TIPS Liquidity Premiums
Once we estimate the model parameters and the state variables, we can calculate the TIPS
liquidity premiums at various maturities based on Equation (35). The top and the middle
panels of Figure 8 plot the 5-, 7- and 10-year liquidity premiums implied by Models L-I
and L-II, respectively, while the bottom panel shows the the deterministic and the stochastic
components of the liquidity premiums based on Model L-IId.
Three things are worth noting from this graph: First, all three panels show that liquidity
premiums exhibit substantial time variations at all maturities. The substantial variabilities at
maturities as long as 10 years are in part due to thefact that the independent liquidity factor is
estimated to be very persistent under the risk-neutral measure. As can be seen from Table 3,
the risk-neutral persistence of the liquidity factor, ~•
=~• + ~¾
~
1
,is estimated to be very small
at around 0.1 in all models and is tightly estimated, with a standard error of about 0.006. In
contrast, thepersistenceparameterunderthephysicalmeasure, ~•, isnot asprecisely estimated,
with typical values of around 0.20 and typical standard errors of around 0.27.
Second, the term structure of TIPS liquidity premiums is relatively flat at all times under
Model L-I, while under Model L-II, the term structure has a mild downward-sloping behavior
27
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested