open source pdf to image converter c# : Adding images to pdf forms application SDK utility html winforms windows visual studio 4142.full0-part504

HEMATOPOIESISAND STEM CELLS
The FA pathway counteracts oxidative stress through selective protection of
antioxidant defense gene promoters
Wei Du,1 Reena Rani,1 Jared Sipple,1 Jonathan Schick,1 Kasiani C. Myers,2,3 Parinda Mehta,2,3 Paul R. Andreassen,1,3
Stella M. Davies,2,3 and Qishen Pang1,3
Divisions of
1
ExperimentalHematology and CancerBiology, and
2
Bone Marrow Transplant and Immune Deficiency Research, CincinnatiChildren’s Hospital
MedicalCenter, Cincinnati, OH; and3Department of Pediatrics, University ofCincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
Oxidative stress has been implicated in
the pathogenesis of many human dis-
eases including Fanconi anemia (FA), a
genetic disorder associated with BM fail-
ure and cancer. Here we show that major
antioxidant defense genes are down-
regulated in FA patients, and that gene
down-regulation is selectivelyassociated
with increased oxidative DNA damage in
the promoters of the antioxidant defense
genes. Assessment of promoter activity
and DNA damage repair kinetics shows
that increased initial damage, rather than
areduced repair rate, contributes to the
augmented oxidative DNA damage.
Mechanistically, FA proteins act in con-
cert withthe chromatin-remodelingfactor
BRG1to protect thepromotersof antioxi-
dant defense genes from oxidative dam-
age. Specifically, BRG1 binds to the pro-
moters of the antioxidant defense genes
at steady state. On challenge with oxida-
tive stress, FA proteins are recruited to
promoter DNA,which correlates with sig-
nificant increase in the binding of BRG1
within promoter regions. In addition, oxi-
dativestress-induced FANCD2ubiquitina-
tion is required for the formation of a
FA-BRG1–promoter complex. Taken to-
gether, these data identify a role for the
FA pathway in cellular antioxidant de-
fense.(Blood. 2012;119(18):4142-4151)
Introduction
Oxidative DNA damage is a major source of genomic instability.
The most prevalent lesion generated by intracellular reactive
oxygen species (ROS) is 8-hydroxydeoxy guanosine (8-oxodG).
This lesion causes G:C to T:A transversion mutations and is
considered highly mutagenic.1 There is compelling evidence that
8-oxodG levels are elevated in various human cancers.
2,3
and in
animal models of tumors.
4,5
ROS-induced DNA damage can also
result insingle- ordouble-strand breaks, which are lethal tothe cell
if not repaired.6,7 Although there is a great deal known about DNA
repair, we have a limited understanding of the involvement of
specific repairpathways in protecting cellular DNA from oxidative
damaging agents, particularly ROS. The major pathways involved
in DNA repair include repair of single-base damage by the base
excision repair (BER) pathway, repair of lesions that distort the
DNA helix by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, and
repair ofDNAdouble-strand breaks by homologous recombination
(HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways.
8-10
Al-
though the specificity and efficiency of each of these DNA repair
pathways is critical to ensure genome stability, the complexity of
ROS-induced oxidative DNA damage may require coordination
between these different pathways.
Cells have developed a battery of defense mechanisms to
protect against damage induced by oxidative stress. Antioxidant
defense enzymes, including superoxide dismutases,catalase, gluta-
thione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins, as well as nonenzymatic
scavengers such as glutathione and carotenoids can directly
eliminate ROS.11 Other cellular enzymes can repair DNA damage
induced by ROS.12 Moreover, ROS can influence the selective
activation of oxidative stress-responsive transcription factors.
Indeed, the first line of defense against oxidative damage is the
induction of stress-response genes, many of which encode antioxi-
dant defense enzymes.13 For example, one of the best-studied
transcription factors activated by oxidative stress is the nuclear
factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is responsible for
the induced expression of several antioxidant defense genes.
14
Promoterrecognition is mediated through transcription factors.For
most transcription factors, consensus binding sites in promoter
regions are moderately to heavily guanine-cytosine rich (GC-rich)
thereby making them highly susceptible to ROS-induced 8-oxodG
formation.1 Fanconi anemia (FA)is agenomic instability syndrome
that is defective for a DNA-damage response pathway which is
essential for defense against a variety of cellular stresses including
oxidative stress.15 Inactivation of this pathway, as seen in FA
patients, results in hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and
cancer susceptibility.
16-18
FA is genetically heterogeneous, with
15 complementation groups (A-P)identified thus far.
19
Eight ofthe
15 FA proteins form a nuclear complex that is responsible for
stress-induced monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. Other
FA proteins—including FANCD1 (which is the breast cancer
protein BRCA2), FANCJ, FANCN, and FANCO, as well as
BRCA1—are also recruited to nuclear foci that contain damaged
DNA and which consequently influence important cellular pro-
cesses such as DNA replication, cell-cycle control, and DNA
damage repair.
16-18
It is now recognized that FAis a unique disease
model characterized by abnormal accumulation of ROS and a
dysfunctional response tooxidative stress.15,20 In the present study,
we show that major antioxidant defense genes are down-regulated
in BM cells of FA patients and that this down-regulation is
Submitted September 27, 2011; accepted March 1, 2012. Prepublished online as
BloodFirstEditionpaper, March9, 2012; DOI 10.1182/blood-2011-09-381970.
Theonline versionof this articlecontains a datasupplement.
The publication costs of this article were defrayed in part by page charge
payment. Therefore, and solely to indicate this fact, this article is hereby
marked‘‘advertisement’’in accordancewith18 USC section 1734.
©2012by TheAmerican Society of Hematology
4142
BLOOD, 3MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER 18
Adding images to pdf forms - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
adding a text field to a pdf; add image to pdf form
Adding images to pdf forms - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
pdf form change font size; create a pdf form from excel
selectively associated with increased oxidative DNAdamage inthe
promoters of these antioxidant defense genes. Furthermore, we
identify a role forFA proteins inprotecting these major antioxidant
defense genes from oxidative damage.
Methods
Analysis of DNA damage
Genomic DNA from H
2
O
2
treated or untreated cells was isolated under
conditions that prevent in vitro oxidation, including the presence of 50μM
of the free radical spin trap pheny-butyl nitrone (PBN; Sigma-Aldrich),
nitrogenation of allbuffers, and avoidance of phenol and high temperature.
DNAdamagewasassayed bycleavageofgenomic DNAwithformamidopy-
rimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg;New England Biolabs),21 which acts as an
N-glycosylase and AP-lysase to excise 8-oxoguanine and other damaged
bases, and whichcreatesa single-strand breakthat preventsPCR amplifica-
tion. Quantitative RT-PCR was then used to determine the content of
specific intact sequences (see supplemental data for list of primer se-
quences, available on the Blood Web site; see the Supplemental Materials
link at the top of the online article). The ratio of PCR products after Fpg
cleavage to those present in uncleaved DNA was used to determine the
percentage of intact DNA. Incorporation of 8-oxo-dG was assayed by
chromatin immunoprecipitation with a mAb to 8-oxo-dG.22
Host cell reactivation assay
The host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair used the pSGG-promoter
reporter system (SwitchGear), into which 1-3 kb human promoter frag-
ments of 4 antioxidant defense genes (GCLC, GPX1, GSTP1, and
TXNRD1) and 2 housekeeping genes (GAPDH and β-Tubulin) were
cloned. Luciferase reporter plasmids were treated with 100μM H
2
O
2
for
1hour in vitro, then transfected into FA-A or correct fibroblasts. Sixteen
hours after transfection, cells were lysed and analyzed by the Dual-
Luciferase Reporter Assay (Promega). To control for transfection effi-
ciency, luciferase activity of the promoter wasnormalized to the activity of
Renilla luciferase. The luciferase activity of H
2
O
2
-damaged reporters was
expressedrelative to the activityof the corresponding nondamagedreporter.
To assessDNA damage in the promoter regionsof the transfectedreporters, the
Fpg cleavage/PCR-based assay was used with PCR primers against regions of
the pSGG plasmid thatencompassed the cloned promoter toexclude amplifica-
tion ofendogenouspromotersequencesofthe targetgenes.
Genetic reconstitution of FA-A and FA-D2 cells
Retroviral vectors encodinghuman pMMP-Puro, pMMP-wt-FANCD2, and
pMMP- FANCD2-K561R were provided by Dr Alan D’Andrea (Harvard
Medical School, Boston, MA). Retroviral vectors MIEG3, MIEG3-
FANCA, and MIEG3-FANCC have been described elsewhere.23 Retrovi-
ruses were prepared by the Vector Core of Cincinnati Children’s Research
Foundation (Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati,
OH). Retroviral supernatant was collected at 36, 48, and 72 hours,
respectively, after transfection. For retroviral transduction, cells were
seededon fibronectin (8 μg/cm2;Takara) coated plates preloaded withviral
supernatantsandincubated ina CO
2
incubator at37°Cfor 4 hours. An equal
volume of medium was then added to the culture. Transductions were
repeated 2times.
Chromatin fractionation
Chromatin was isolated as described previously.24 Briefly, treated or
untreated cellswere harvested and washedwith cold PBSthen collectedby
centrifugation. Pellets were suspended in cold buffer A24 and incubated at
room temperature for2 minutesto permeabilize the cells.Pelletswere again
collected by centrifugation and washed with cold buffer A. Nuclei were
then digested with RNase-free DNase I (200 U/mL; Roche) in buffer A for
30 minutes. Pellets were extracted with cold buffer A containing 250mM
ammonium sulfate for 5 minutes. The supernatant (chromatin fraction) was
collected by centrifugation at 956g for 3 minutes. Cell-equivalent volumes
of the chromatin extractswere separatedbySDS-PAGEand immunoblotted
withthe indicatedAbs.
ChIP
The ChIP assay was performed as described previously21 with minor
modifications. Briefly, chromatin was cross-linked by adding 37% formal-
dehyde with rotation at 4°C for 10 minutes and then room temperature for
20 minutes. The pellet was resuspended in lysis buffer (1% SDS, 10mM
EDTA, 50mM Tris-HCL, pH 8.1, and protease inhibitors) and sonicated
with repeated 10-second pulses. Residual unfragmented chromatin was
removed by centrifugation at15 000g for 10 minutes. The amountof DNA
in the supernatant was quantified and adjusted to 100 ng/μL. Supernatant
(200 μL) wasdiluted 10-fold in 2 mL of ChIP dilution buffer (0.01% SDS,
1.1% Triton X-100, 1.2mM EDTA, 16.7mM Tris-HCL, pH 8.1, 167mM
NaCl, and protease inhibitors), and precleared twice with BSA-blocked
protein L agarose (Pierce). The beads were centrifuged and the supernatant
was divided into 500-μL aliquotsrepresenting input DNA, and material for
immunoprecipitation, and an IgG control. Primary Ab was added and
incubated at 4°C overnight. Anti–8-oxoguanine (Chemicon), FANCD2
(Novus Biologicals), BRG1 (Millipore), FLAG (Sigma-Aldrich), acety-
lated H3K9/14 (Millipore), and methylated H3K9 (Millipore) Abs were
used for immunoprecipitation, and ChromPure rabbit IgG (Jackson Immu-
noResearch Laboratories) wasused for the IgG control.
Results
The FA pathway engages in the oxidativestress response
To examine whether the FA pathway is involved in the oxidative
stress response, we subjected primary BM progenitor cells from
FA-A and FA-C patients to hydrogen peroxide (H
2
O
2
), a potent
producer of ROS. We observed decreased colony formation in FA
BM samples compared with normal BM samples, and a signifi-
cantly greater decrement in colony formation after H
2
O
2
treatment
in the cells derived from FA patients (Figure 1A). To further define
the involvement of FA proteins in the oxidative stress response, we
also challenged lymphoblasts derived from FA-A or FA-C patients
with increasing doses of H
2
O
2
.Again, both FA-A and FA-C cells
showeda dose-dependent decrease in survival (Figure 1B).Recon-
stitution of the mutant cells with the FANCA or FANCC gene
preventedH
2
O
2
-inducedkilling(Figure1B).BecauseDNAdamage-
induced G
2
/M arrest is a hallmark of FA cells,25 we asked whether
oxidative stress induced accumulation of FA cells in the G
2
/M
phase. Indeed,H
2
O
2
treatment led to a significantly increasedG
2
/M
population in FA-A or FA-C lymphoblasts compared with normal
cells (supplemental Figure 1A). To biochemically demonstrate the
activation of the FA pathway in the oxidative stress response, we
examined FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a critical step in the
regulation of DNA repair by the FA pathway.26 H
2
O
2
induced
FANCD2 monoubiquitination (supplemental Figure 1B) as well as
FANCD2 foci formation (supplemental Figure 1C) in genetically
corrected, but not mutant, FA-A or FA-C cells. Together, these
results indicate that the FA pathway is engaged in the oxidative
stress response.
Expression of antioxidant defensegenes isdown-regulated in
FA cells
We hypothesized thattheoxidant hypersensitivityofFA cells might
have resulted from a compromised interaction between the FA
pathway and other cellular oxidative stress-response pathways. To
investigate whether FA proteins modulated genes involved in
oxidative stress response, we first performed pathway-specificgene
FAPATHWAYPROTECTSANTIOXIDANTDEFENSE GENES
4143
BLOOD,3 MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER18
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from PDF page(s) to current target PDF document in server-side application and Windows Forms project using a
create a pdf form online; add fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
add text field to pdf; change font size in pdf form field
array analysis using BM samples from FA-A patients and healthy
donors. We found that important genes functioning in antioxidant
defense and ROS metabolism were significantly down-regulated in
FA-A samples,comparedwiththose of normal donors (supplemen-
tal Figure 2). Several major antioxidant defense genes, including
glutathione peroxidase 1(GPX1),glutathioneperoxidase3(GPX3),
peroxiredoxin 3 (PRDX3), superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (SOD1
and SOD2), thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1), NAD(P)H:
quinone oxireductase (NQO1) and catalase (CAT), showed a
>20-fold down-regulation in FA patients, compared with healthy
donors (Figure 1C). We confirmed these gene profile data using
RT-PCR (Figure 1D) and Western blotting (Figure 1E) using BM
Figure1. Down-regulationofantioxidantgenesin FABM cells. (A)Hypersensitivity of FABM progenitorstoH
2
O
2
.BM cells from5 FA-Aand 2FA-C patients, as wellas
5healthydonors,weretreatedwith100μMH
2
O
2
for2 hoursfollowedbyacolony-formingassay.Colonynumbers werecounted10daysafterplating.Results aremeans±SD
of 3independent experiments. (B)Hypersensitivity of FALCLs toH
2
O
2
.FA-ALCLs andcells correctedwith theFANCAgeneweretreatedwithincreasingdoses of H
2
O
2
for
2hoursfollowedbycultureinfreshmediumforanadditional24hours.Cellswerethenanalyzedforcellsurvival.(C)BMcellsfrom5FA-A,1FA-B,2FA-C,1FA-D1,1FA-I,and
1FA-J patientsandhealthydonors wereusedforpathway-specific(oxidativestress andantioxidantdefense)arrayanalysis.Eighty-fourgenes involvedinantioxidativestress
response were analyzed. The data represent the fold down-regulation of the indicated genes in FA samples relative to healthy donors. Fold down-regulation =-1/(fold
difference), where folddifference= [2-∆∆Ct (FA)]/[2-∆∆Ct(healthy)]. (D) RT-PCRanalysis of antioxidant gene expressioninFA-ABM cells. RNAwas extractedfrom BM cells
from 2FA-Apatients and 2healthy donors followedby RT-PCRanalysis. (E)Western analysisof antioxidant geneproducts in FA-ABMcells.Proteinlysateswere prepared
fromcells describedinpanelBfollowedbyWesternblotanalysisusingtheindicatedAbs. RelativemRNAandproteinlevelswerequantifiedusingImageJ software(NIH).The
results wereplottedafternormalizationwithβ-actinasaninternalcontrol.
4144
DU etal
BLOOD, 3MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER 18
VB.NET Image: Adding Line Annotation to Images with VB.NET Doc
full sample codes for printing line annotation on images. Basic .NET sample codes for adding a line System.Text Imports System.Windows.Forms Imports RasterEdge
add fields to pdf form; change font in pdf fillable form
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server-side application and .NET Windows Forms. Support adding PDF page number.
best way to create pdf forms; change font size in pdf form
cells from 2 pairs of FA-A patients and healthy donors. We also
observed similar down-regulation of these antioxidant defense
genes in BM samples from patients with mutations in the FANC -B,
-C, -D1, -I,and-J genes,whichcorrespondtothe respective FA -B,
-C, -D1, -I, and -J complementation groups (Figure 1C). These
results suggest that the FA pathway engages the cellular oxidative
response through regulationof antioxidant defense genes.
Down-regulation of antioxidant defense genes in FA cells is
associated with aselectiveincrease in promoter DNA damage
Because the down-regulation of the antioxidant defense genes in
FA cells was identified at the transcriptional level, we asked
whether there was increased oxidative damage in the promoter
region of these genes. We treated FA-A and genetically cor-
rected lymphoblasts with H
2
O
2
and isolated genomic DNA to
assay oxidative DNA-damage repair. This assay used Fpg,21 an
N-glycosidase and AP-lyase that selectively cleaves oxidative-
damaged bases predominantly 8-oxodG. Because Fpg creates a
single strand break at a damaged base, rendering it resistant to PCR
amplification,damageto a definedDNAregion canbedetermined by a
decrease in intact DNA for that specific sequence. For instance, there
was a markedreductionofintact DNA after Fpgcleavageof the GPX1
gene promoter DNA in FA-A cells (supplemental Figure 3A). In
contrast, the same promoter region of the GPX1gene showed minimal
DNA damage in the genetically corrected cells (supplemental Figure
3B).This index ofDNAdamage was comparedforhousekeepinggenes
(GAPDH, actin, and β-tubulin) that were stably expressed in both FA
andnormalcells (Figure 1D-E).DNAdamage, indicatedbya reduction
in intact DNA, was markedly increased in the promoters of several
antioxidant defense genes, including GCLC, TXNRD1, GSTP1
and GPX1, compared with their coding regions in FA-A lympho-
blasts (Figure 2A-B). Normal cells or genetically corrected FA-A
cells showed significantly less promoter DNA damage in the
antioxidant genes (Figure2A-B). To demonstrate thatthe increased
levels of DNA damage in the promoters were specific to the
antioxidative defense genes, we analyzed oxidative DNA damage
to the promoters on 2 additional control genes, Ubiquitin B and
SFRP1, which are not involved in the oxidative stress response.21
Notably, we did not observe a significant increase in DNA damage
in the promoter regions of these genes in FA-A cells, compared
with their genetically corrected counterparts (Figure 2A-B). To-
gether, these results demonstrate that promoters of the antioxidant
defense genes were selectively damaged by oxidative stress in
FA cells.
Figure2. Down-regulation ofantioxidantgenesisassociated withaselectiveincreaseinpromoterDNAdamagein FA cells.(A)IncreasedpromoterDNAdamagein
antioxidantgenesin FA-Acells. FA-Acells transducedwithemptyvectoror cDNA-encoding FANCA, as well as anormalcontrol, weretreatedwith100μM H
2
O
2
for2 hours
followedby 12hours of culture infresh medium. Genomic DNAwas isolated followedby FPG cleavageandqPCR usingprimers specific forthe promoters of the indicated
genes.ThepercentageofintactDNArepresentstheratioof PCRproductsafterFpgcleavagetothosepresentinuncleavedDNA.(B)DNAdamageinthecodingsequencesof
antioxidant defense genes. The same analysis was applied as described in panel A using primers specific for exons of the indicated genes. (C-D) Increased 8-oxodG
accumulation in thepromoters of antioxidant genes inFAcells. FA-Aor gene-corrected cells weretreatedwithincreasingdoses of H
2
O
2
for2 hours andreleased intofresh
mediumforanother12hours, followedby ChIPusinganAbagainst8-oxodG. PrecipitatedsampleswerethensubjectedtoPCRusingprimersspecific forpromoterregionsof
(C)GPX1or(D)TXNRD1gene. Representativeimages (left)andquantifications (right)areshown.TheintensitiesofDNAbandswerequantifiedusingImageJ software(NIH).
Resultsaremeans± SDof3independentexperiments.
FAPATHWAYPROTECTSANTIOXIDANTDEFENSE GENES
4145
BLOOD,3 MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER18
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create PDF from Jpeg, png, images.
convert word document to editable pdf form; add print button to pdf form
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
PDF page in many ways, like adding rectangle, line view, annotate, process, save and scan images (supporting JPEG and BMP) and document files (TIFF, PDF and Word
add date to pdf form; chrome save pdf form
To further substantiate the observationthat the down-regulation
of specific genes we observed in FA cells was associated with
increased DNA damage to the corresponding promoters, we
performed ChIP analysis of the antioxidant gene promoters with a
mAb to 8-oxo-dG. The results showed increased accumulation of
8-oxo-dG in the promoters of both GPX1 (Figure 2C) and
TXNRD1 (Figure 2D) genes of FA-A cells compared with the
geneticallycorrected cells.Thus, increased promoter DNA damage
is associated with reduced antioxidant gene expression in FA cells.
Increased initial oxidative DNA damageto the promoters of
antioxidant genes in FA cells
While these data established a correlation between FA deficiency
and increased promoter DNA damage, it was not clear whether the
FA proteins function in oxidative DNA-damage repair or in
protection of the promoter DNA from oxidative damage. To
distinguish between these 2 possibilities, we designed 3 sets of
experiments. First, we conducted an in vivo DNA-repair assay to
Figure3. Increased initial oxidative DNA damage to
the promoters of antioxidant genes in FA cells.
(A)Repairkinetics of oxidativedamageto GPX1 promoter.
FA-Acellsorgene-correctedcellsweretreatedwithH
2
O
2
for
2hoursandreleasedfortheindicatedtimeintervalsfollowed
by genomic DNA or RNA isolation. Samples were then
subjected to (left) DNA-damage assay or (right) RT-PCR.
(B)Repairkineticsof oxidativedamagetoGSTP1promoter.
Samples described inpanelAwerethen subjectedto(left)
DNA-damageassay or(right)RT-PCR.Percentageof intact
DNAistheratioofPCRproductsafterFpgcleavagetothose
present in uncleaved DNA. (C) Increased initial oxidative
DNAdamageinFA-Acells. CellsdescribedinpanelAwere
usedforChIPusinganAbagainst 8-oxodG andPCRusing
primers specific for(left)GPX1or (right)GSTP1 promoter.
Representativeimages(top)andquantifications(bottom)are
shown. Results are means ± SD of 3independent experi-
ments. (D) Repair efficiency as determined by host cell-
reactivationassay.ThepSSG-promoterreportervectorcon-
tainingpromoter regions of antioxidant geneGCLC, GPX1,
GSTP1, or TXNRD1, as well as control gene GAPDH or
β-tubulin, weretreatedwith100μM H
2
O
2
for 1hour in vitro
and then transfectedinto normal, FA-A, or gene-corrected
fibroblasts followed by determination of luciferase activity.
Results are means ±SD of 3 independent experiments.
(E) Repair kinetics of oxidative damagetonakedpromoter
DNA. Genomic DNAwas isolated from cells described in
panelD followedby FpgcleavageandqPCRusingprimers
specific for the cloned GPX1 promoter. The level of intact
DNArepresentstheefficiencyofrepair.
4146
DU etal
BLOOD, 3MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER 18
C# Image: Document Image Ellipse Annotation Creating and Adding
on color, bitional and black & white images; annotation shape to image - support adding rubber stamp powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf form save with reader; change text size pdf form
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
After adding WinViewer DLL into Visual Studio Toolbox, you link to see more C# PDF imaging project converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
add jpg to pdf form; adding text to pdf form
measure levels of promoter DNA damage and promoter transcrip-
tion activity up to 18 hours after H
2
O
2
treatment. Specifically, we
examined the repair kinetics of oxidative damage to the promoter
on 2 of the down-regulated antioxidant genes, GPX1 and GSTP1. To
achieve this, we treated FA-A or genetically corrected cells with H
2
O
2
for 2hours and allowed the cells to repair oxidative damage in fresh
medium. We then isolated genomic DNA and RNA at different time
points for a DNA-repair assay and determination of mRNA levels.
Although the kinetics for both promoter repair and transcriptional
recovery looked similar between FA-A and genetically corrected cells,
FA-A cells consistentlyexhibitedhigherpromoterdamage(lowerlevels
of intact DNA) than the genetically corrected cells (Figure 3A left),
indicating a higher level of initial damage. Consistent with this, GPX1
mRNA expression was restored at roughly the same rate in both FA-A
and genetically corrected cells (Figure 3A right). Similar results were
obtained with the GSTP1 gene (Figure 3B). These results suggest no
significant deficitintherate ofrepair ofoxidativeDNAdamage tothese
promoters inFA-Acells.
Figure4. Oxidative stress-induced formationofa FA-BRG1–promoter complex. (A) FANCD2does not bindtothepromoters of antioxidant genes in unstressed cells.
Untreated normal lymphoblasts were subjected to a ChIP assay using Abs against FANCD2 or BRG1. PCR amplification was performed using primers specific for the
promoters of indicated antioxidant orhousekeepinggenes. (B) FANCD2 is recruited to the GPX1and TXNRD1promoter regions after H
2
O
2
treatment. Normal cells were
treatedwith100μMH
2
O
2
for2 hoursthenreleasedfortheindicatedtimeintervals.Proteins wereextractedatdifferenttimepoints,followedbyaChIPassayusingAbsagainst
FANCD2orBRG1. Precipitatedsampleswerethen subjectedtoPCR usingprimersfor thepromotersof GPX1orTXNRD1.Representativeimages(top)andquantifications
(botton) were shown. The intensity of the DNA bands was quantified using ImageJ software (NIH). Results are means ± SD of 3 independent experiments.
(C) FA-BRG1-promoter complex was absent inFAcells. FA-Acells were treatedwith100μMH
2
O
2
for 2hours then released for theindicated time intervals. Proteins were
extractedat different time points, followed by aChIPassay usingAbs against FANCD2 or BRG1. Precipitated samples werethen subjected to PCR using primers forthe
promotersofGPX1orTXNRD1.(D)Oxidativestressinduces accumulationof acetylatedhistoneinthepromotersofantioxidantgenesofbothnormalandFAcells.Normaland
FA-A cells were treated with or without 100μM H
2
O
2
for 2hours followed by release into fresh medium. Cells were then subjected to ChIP assay using Abs specific for
acetylatedhistoneH3K9/14(Ac-H3K9/14)ormethylatedhistone H3K9 (Me-H3K9)followed by PCR usingprimersforthepromoterregions of GPX1, TXNRD1, orβ-tubulin.
Representativeimages(top)andquantifications(bottom)areshown.TheintensityoftheDNAbands wasquantifiedusingImageJsoftware(NIH). Results aremeans± SDof
3independent experiments. (E) Repair kinetics of oxidative damagein BRG1-bound antioxidant genepromoter. FA-Aandgene-correctedcells weretreatedwith orwithout
H
2
O
2
for2hours andreleasedintofreshmediumforupto24hours.ChIPassay usingAbsagainst BRG1was performed, andtheboundDNAfragmentsweresubjectedtothe
Fpgcleavage/PCR-based DNArepair assay usingprimers specificforthe promoter of (left)GPX1 or(right)TXNRD1. Percentageof intact DNArepresents theratioof PCR
productsafterFpgcleavagetothosepresent inuncleavedDNA.
FAPATHWAYPROTECTSANTIOXIDANTDEFENSE GENES
4147
BLOOD,3 MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER18
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
add signature field to pdf; changing font in pdf form
VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
at the page level, like TIFF page adding & deleting controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and more
acrobat create pdf form; add form fields to pdf
In the second set of experiments, we performed ChIP to assess
the repair kinetics of 8-oxo-dG.22Again, we observed higher level
of GPX1 (Figure 3C left) and GSTP1 (Figure 3C right) promoter
DNA containing 8-oxo-dG during the first 2 hours after H
2
O
2
treatment and slower clearance of the oxidative DNA adducts in
FA-A cells than in corrected cells. Finally, we used a promoter
reporter system in a host cell-reactivation assay
27
to determine
repair efficiency of oxidative DNA damage. We cloned the
promoters of 4 antioxidant genes in luciferase reporter plasmids
and generated oxidative DNA damage in vitro on the naked gene
promoterDNA. We thentransfectedthetreated plasmids into FA-A
or gene-corrected fibroblasts, and assayed for promoter transcrip-
tion activity, which was presumably correlated with repair effi-
ciency of the cells. The results show that activation of
in vitro–damaged reporters was reduced for reporters carrying the
promoters of all 4 antioxidant genes, compared with reporters
containing the GAPDH or β-tubulin promoter (Figure 3D). How-
ever, there was no difference in repairefficiencybetween FA-A and
genetically corrected or normal cells. Furthermore, analysis of the
repair kinetics of the damage plasmids up to 18 hours posttransfec-
tion, using the Fpg cleavage/PCR-based assay, also showed no
deficiency of the repair of oxidative DNA damage to the naked
promoter DNA in FA-A cells (Figure 3E). Together, these results
suggest that exaggerated initial damage rather than reduced repair
contributes to elevatedlevels ofpromoterDNAdamage in FAcells.
Oxidative stress-induced formation of aFA-BRG1–promoter
complex
Because our results suggest that FA proteins play a role in
protection of antioxidant gene promoters from oxidative damage
and because transcriptional regulation involves chromatinremodel-
ing, we asked whether the FA pathway interacts with the cellular
chromatin-remodeling machinery. We performed a ChIP assay
using Abs against FANCD2 and BRG1, a chromatin-remodeling
ATPase subunit of the BAF complex,
28,29
to examine the possibility
that oxidative stress would induce simultaneous binding of these
2factors tothe same promoterDNA. The reason forusing BRG1 in
this study was 2-fold. First, BRG1 is a major factor in chromatin
remodeling, which is commonly used in studies involving chroma-
tin remodeling. Second, a previous study had demonstrated an
interaction between FANCA andBRG1.
30
BRG1 but not FANCD2
bound to the promoters of the antioxidant defense genes, as well as
GAPDH and β-tubulin, at steady state (Figure 4A). On challenge
with oxidative stress, FANCD2 was recruited to the promoters of
GPX1 (Figure 4B top) and TXNRD1 (Figure 4B bottom), which
correlatedwitha significantincrease in the binding ofBRG1within
the same promoter regions.This induced binding lasted for at least
12 hours after the cells were released from H
2
O
2
treatment (Figure
4B). In contrast, there was no induction of BRG1 binding and no
FANCD2 bound to the GPX1 or TNXRD1 promoter in FA-A cells
(Figure 4C). These data suggest that the FA pathway may
participate inchromatinremodelingandtherebyregulatingtranscrip-
tionof the antioxidant genes.
We next asked whether the FA pathway was essential for a
transcriptionally active chromatin in the promoter regions of the
antioxidant genes. Acetylation of Histone H3 at residues lysine
9and 14 (Ac-H3K9/14) is a marker of open or transcriptionally
active chromatin, whereas methylation of Histone H3 at lysine
9(Me-H3K9) is an epigenetic hallmark for closed ortranscription-
ally silent chromatin.31-34 ChIP usingAbs specific forAc-H3K9/14
and Me-H3K9 shows that oxidative stress-induced accumulationof
acetylated H3K9/14 but not methylated H3K9 in the promoter
regions of GPX1 and TXNRD1 (Figure 4D). We noted that this
oxidative stress-induced enrichment of acetylated H3K9/14 was
not observed inthe β-tubulinpromoter.Interestingly,this change to
transcriptionally active chromatin structure in the defined regions
of the antioxidant gene promoters occurred in both normal and
FA-A cells (Figure 4D). Thus, oxidative stress-induced formation
of a transcriptionally active chromatin structure inthe promoters of
the antioxidant genes is independent ofthe FApathway.
The observation that oxidative stress induced the formation of
actively transcriptionally active chromatin promoters of the antioxidant
genes in FA cells promptedus to test whether the open chromatin DNA
was vulnerabletoROS attack.WecombinedaBRG1ChIPwiththeFpg
cleavage/PCR-based DNA repair assay to compare the kinetics of the
repairofoxidativedamage inthepromoters antioxidant genes boundby
BRG1in FA-A and gene-corrected cells. In FA-Acells, we observed a
rapid increase in oxidative DNAdamage,as measured by a decrease in
intact DNA, at BRG1-bound promoters for both the GPX1 and
TXNRD1 genes during the first 2hours after oxidative stress (Figure
4E).Incontrast,geneticallycorrectedcellsshowedmuchless damagein
BRG1-bound promoter DNA at each time point during the posttreat-
mentperiodthandidFA-Acells (Figure 4E).There was aslow repairof
this damaged DNA in both cell types after this initial 2-hour period.
These results suggest that the formation of the FA-BRG1–promoter
complexmay protect antioxidant genes fromoxidativedamage.
Binding of FANCD2 to promoters isindependent of BRG1
Given that FANCD2 is recruited to the promoters of antioxidant genes
on oxidative stress, we asked whether FANCD2-promoter binding
required BRG1. We used shRNA to knockdown BRG1 in normal cells
(Figure 5A). We then performed ChIP to determine the binding of
FANCD2 to the promoters of the GPX1 and TXNRD1 genes under
oxidative stress in cells with knockdown of BRG1. We found that
bindingof FANCD2 to these promoters was independent of BRG1, as
BRG1knockdowndid notreducethe recruitmentofFANCD2toGPX1
or TXNRD1 promoters (Figure 5B). It is noteworthy that in normal
cells, BRG1 knockdown resulted in higher H
2
O
2
sensitivity than
expression of a control shRNA (supplemental Figure 4A). However,
Figure5.Binding of FANCD2 topromotersisindependentofBRG1. (A)Knock-
down of BRG1. Normal lymphoblasts expressing a shRNA for Brg1 or a control
shRNAweretreatedwithorwithout 100μM H
2
O
2
for2hours. Cellextractswerethen
subjected to Western blotting using Abs against BRG1 and actin. (B) Binding of
FANCD2 to promoters is independent of BRG1. Cells described in panel A were
treated with or without H
2
O
2
,followed by aChIP assay usingAbs against FANCD2.
PCR was performed using primers specific for the promoter regions of GPX1,
TXNRD1,GAPDH,orβ-tubulin.
4148
DU etal
BLOOD, 3MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER 18
knockdownofBRG1inFA-Acells didnotfurtherincreasesensitivityto
H
2
O
2
treatment(supplementalFigure 4B).
FANCD2ubiquitination is required for the formation of the
FA-BRG1–promoter complexand for protection against
oxidative damage
Because FANCD2 monoubiquitination is an activating event inthe
FA pathway in response to DNA damage, we determined whether
FANCD2 ubiquitination was required for the formation of the
FA-BRG1–promoter complex.Wereconstituted FANCD2-deficient
cells with WT FANCD2 or with the FANCD2-K561R mutant that
cannot be monoubiquitinated26 (Figure 6A). Oxidative stress
induced significant recruitment of BRG1 into the total chromatin
fraction in WT FANCD2-corrected cells but not in FANCD2-
deficient cells or those containing the FANCD2-K561R mutant
(Figure 6B). This suggests that increased loading of BRG1 into
chromatin in response to oxidative stress may not be specific for
antioxidant genes. We also observed that oxidative stress induced
chromatin loading of endogenous FANCA, FANCC, and FANCG,
as well as the FOXO3a proteins, in cells reconstituted with WT
FANCD2 (Figure 6B). ChIP of the GPX1 promoter with a mAb to
BRG1 or the Flag-tagged FANCA showed that the FA-BRG1-
promoter complex was formed only in cells reconstituted withWT
FANCD2(Figure 6C). Moreover,the combination ofa BRG1ChIP
with the Fpg cleavage/PCR-based DNA repairassay shows that the
nonubiquitinated FANCD2-K561R mutant failed to protect the
GPX1 gene promoter from oxidative DNA damage (Figure 6D).
Together, these results indicate that FANCD2monoubiqitination is
required for both FA-BRG1–promoter complex formation and for
protectionof promoter DNA from oxidative damage.
Discussion
This study links the FA pathway with the oxidative response by
identifying a role for the FA proteins in safeguarding the cellular
antioxidant defense system. We have provided several lines of
evidence to support this link: (1) we show that oxidative stress
induces monoubiquitination of FANCD2, a biochemical hallmark
of the activation of the FA pathway.26 (2) Several major antioxidant
defense genes are significantly down-regulated in BM cells of FA
patients in 6 complementation (A, B, C, D1, I, and J) groups.
(3) Oxidative stress induces selective DNA damage, particularly
8-oxo-dG, to the promoters of these antioxidant genes in FA cells,
which can be prevented by genetic reconstitution of the mutant
cells with the appropriate FA gene. (4) The FANCA or FANCD2
protein forms a ternary complex with the chromatin-remodeling
factor BRG1 at the promoters of the antioxidant genes in response
to oxidative stress.(5) Oxidativestress–inducedFANCD2 ubiquiti-
nation is required for the formation of the FA-BRG1–promoter
complex. (6) The FA-BRG1–promoter complex is essential for the
protection of the promoters of antioxidant genes from oxidative
damage. Thus, our study identifies a role for the FA pathway in the
response to oxidative stress.
One intriguing finding of the present study is our observation
that oxidative DNA damage is markedlyincreasedinthe promoters
Figure 6. FANCD2 ubiquitination is required for the formation of FA-BRG1–promoter complex. (A) Reconstitution of the FA-D2 cells with WT FANCD2 or the
nonubiquitinated FANCD2-K561R mutant. FANCD2-deficient PD20 cell were transduced with retrovirus-expressing empty vector, WT-FANCD2, or the FANCD2-K561R
mutant followed by puromycinselection. Stable cell lines were treated withor without H
2
O
2
followed by Westernanalysis usingAbs against FANCD2, FANCA, BRG1, or
β-actin. (B)Oxidativestress induceschromatinloadingof BRG1andFAproteinsinFANCD2-correctedcells. CellsdescribedinpanelAweretreatedwithorwithoutH
2
O
2
followedby
chromatinfractionation.ChromatinextractswerethenanalyzedbyWesternblottingwithAbsagainstBRG1,FANCA,FANCC,FANCD2,FANCG,orFOXO3a.HistoneH2Awasincluded
as aloadingcontrol. (C) FANCD2ubiquitination is requiredfor the formation of the FA-BRG1-DNAcomplex. Cells describedin panelAwere transduced withretrovirus expressing
Flag-taggedFANCA,followedbycellsortingforGFP.SortedcellswerethentreatedwithorwithoutH
2
O
2
for2hoursandreleasedfortheindicatedhours. ChIPassaysusingAbsagainst
FlagorBRG1werefollowedbyPCRamplificationusingprimersspecificforthepromoterofGPX1.(D)FANCD2ubiquitinationis requiredfortheprotectionofantioxidantgenepromoter
DNAfromoxidativedamage. Cells describedinpanelC weretreatedwithorwithoutH
2
O
2
for2hours andreleasedintofreshmediumforanadditional12hours. ChIPassay usingAb
against BRG1was performed, and boundDNAfragments were subjectedto theFpgcleavage/PCR-basedDNA-repair assay usingprimers specific forthepromoter of GPX1. The
percentageofintactDNArepresentstheratioofPCRproductsafterFpgcleavagetothosepresentinuncleavedDNA.
FAPATHWAYPROTECTSANTIOXIDANTDEFENSE GENES
4149
BLOOD,3 MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER18
of several antioxidant defense genes, compared with their coding
regions in lymphoblasts derived from a FA-A patient (Figure 2),
suggesting that these promoters were selectively damaged by
oxidative radicals in FA-deficient cells. Our results are consistent
with recent studies showing that the expression of certain stress
response, antioxidant and DNA repair genes is down-regulated in
aged human brain samples because of selective damage in the
promoters of these genes induced by oxidative stress.21 Promoter
regions may be especiallyvulnerable,as they contain (G + C)–rich
sequences that are highly sensitive to oxidative DNA damage and
are not protected bytranscription-coupled repair.34This vulnerabil-
ity may be augmented in FA cells. Indeed, correction of the mutant
cells with a functional FANCA protein protected the promoter
DNA of the antioxidant genes from oxidative damage. Based on
these results, we propose that one critical function of FA proteins
under oxidative stress is to regulate the expression of antioxidant
defense genes through protecting the gene promoters from oxida-
tive DNA damage.
While these results suggest a correlationbetween FA deficiency
and promotervulnerability, it remains tobe establishedwhetherthe
FAproteins function in oxidative DNA-damage repair orprotection
of the promoter DNA from oxidative damage. Loss of FA protein
function can compromise the damage response/repair process or
render chromosomal DNA susceptible to ROS attack, thereby
increasing oxidative DNA damage. To distinguish between these
2possibilities, we conducted time-course studies to assess DNA
repair kinetics by examining the levels of promoter DNA damage
and promoter transcription activity after H
2
O
2
treatment. We
reasoned that if the FA mutant cells consistently showed a delay in
kinetics of DNA damage repair as evidenced by the slower
clearance of the oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-dG) and reduced
mRNA transcription of the antioxidant defense genes than the
gene-corrected cells did, this would suggest that FA cells accumu-
lated high levels of oxidative DNA damage because of impairment
of DNA damage response/repair rather than to an increase in the
susceptibility of their DNA to oxidative damage. However, our
results show the opposite (Figure 3A-B). Furthermore, the host
cell-reactivation assay with luciferase reporter plasmids clearly
shows that transcription activation or repair rate of the naked
reporter plasmids damaged in vitro was not reduced for the
reporters derived from the promoters of the antioxidant defense
genes in FA cells compared with the gene-corrected cells (Figure
3C and D).Thus, we argue that FA proteins more likely function to
protect the promoter DNA from oxidative damage rather than to
repair the damage.
An extensive body of evidence which suggests that FA proteins
engage in cellularantioxidant defense supports our present finding.
For instance, 3 major FA core complex components, FANCA,
FANCC, and FANCG,16-18 were found to interact with a variety of
cellular factors that primarily functioninoxidative stress signaling.
It has been shown that oxidative stress induces the formation of a
FA subcomplex containing FANCA and FANCG.35 Furthermore,
the FANCC protein interacts with NADPH cytochrome P450
reductase and glutathione S-transferase P1-1,36,37 2 redox enzymes
involved in detoxificationof reactiveintermediates including ROS.
Fancc-/- mice deficient in the antioxidative enzyme Cu/Zn
superoxide dismutase exhibit defective hematopoiesis.38 Fancc-/-
cells also display hyperactivation of ASK1, a serine-threonine
kinase that plays an important role in redox apoptotic signaling.
39
In addition, FANCG interacts with cytochrome P450 2E1, which is
associated with the production of reactive oxygen intermediates,
and the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin-3.40,41
Finally, we recently reported that FANCD2 associated with
FOXO3a, a master regulator of oxidative stress response.42 Al-
though these observations point to the involvement of FA proteins
in oxidative stress response, the molecular mechanism by which
FA proteins function to modulate oxidative stress response has not
beendefined.
In this context, our study indicates for the first time that the FA
pathway plays a crucial role in protecting major antioxidant
defense genes from oxidative damage. Protection appears to be
accomplished through a mechanism involving interaction with the
chromatin-remodeling machinery in response to oxidative stress.
Indeed, we show that oxidative stress-induced activation of the FA
pathway (FANCD2 ubiquitination) is required for the formation of
the FA-BRG1-promoter complex. We also showed that this com-
plex is essential for the protection of the antioxidant gene
promoters from oxidative damage. BRG1 has been shown to
interact with the FANCA protein.30 Furthermore, BRG1 plays a
role in the inducible expression of certain antioxidant genes43 and
in the transcriptional induction of a subset of IFN-inducible genes
through interactions with specific transcription factors such as
STATs.44 Our studies, taken together with these reports, suggest
that induced recruitment of BRG1 and the FA proteins to the
promoters of the antioxidant defense genes by oxidative stress may
playa role in the transcriptional induction of these genes.
It is interesting that oxidative stress induces accumulation of
acetylated H3K9/14 but not methylated H3K9 in the promoter
regions of the antioxidant genes (Figure 4C), suggesting the
formation of an actively transcriptional chromatin structure. How-
ever, because the levels of acetylated H3K9/14 are comparable in
both normal and FA cells, a H
2
O
2
-induced change of the chromatin
at the promoters of antioxidant genes to a more open state does not
seem to fully explain differences in their expression between these
cell types. One possibility is that the relationship between histone
acetylation and transcription activation may actually be complex
and could involve other epigenetic signals. Furthermore, DNA-
damage repair could also playa roleintranscriptional regulation. It
has been suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is
required for the processing and repair of 8-oxodG in the nucleo-
somes.
45
Alternatively, it is possible that oxidative stress–induced
open chromatin DNA requires the coordinate action of chromatin-
remodeling machinery and other cellular factors, such as FA
proteins, to safeguard the gene promoters from inactivation by
oxidative DNA damage. The precise mechanisms responsible for
protectionof the “open” antioxidantgene promoters fromoxidative
damage remain to be elucidated but could involve a localized
formation of the FA-BRG1–promoter complex. Our present study
suggests that the formation of this complex involves oxidative
stress-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination (Figure 6). In this
context, our results are consistent with the notion that chromatin
response to DNA damage is a major mechanism required to
safeguardthe integrityof the genome.
46
In summary, the present studies demonstrate that the down-
regulation ofmajor antioxidant defense genes is selectively associ-
ated with increased promoter DNA damage and that the FA
pathway functions to protect these genes from oxidative DNA
damage through a mechanism involving interaction with the
cellular chromatin-remodeling machinery. These findings not only
provide a molecular explanation for FA-oxidant hypersensitivity
but also suggest new targets for therapeutically exploring the
pathogenic role of oxidative stress in human diseases.
4150
DU etal
BLOOD, 3MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER 18
Acknowledgments
The authors thankDrAlanD’Andrea (Harvard Medical School)for
the pMMP-Puro, pMMP-FANCD2, and pMMP-K561R-FANCD2
retroviral vectors,theFanconiAnemia Comprehensive Care Center
(Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center) for BM samples,
and the VectorCore ofthe Cincinnati Children’s Research Founda-
tion (Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center) for the
preparationof lentiviruses.
This work was supported in part by National Institutes of Health
(NIH)grants R01HL076712andR01 CA157537.Q.P.is supportedby
aLeukemia and Lymphoma Scholar award. W.D. is supported by a
FanconiAnemiaResearchFundgrantandanNIH T32traininggrant.
Authorship
Contribution: W.D. designed and performed research, analyzed
data, and wrote the manuscript; R.R., K.C.M., and P.M. performed
research and analyzed data; J. Sipple and J. Schick performed
research; P.R.A. and S.M.D. designed research; and Q.P. designed
research, analyzed data, and wrote the manuscript.
Conflict-of-interest disclosure: The authors declare no compet-
ing financial interests.
Correspondence:Qishen Pang,Divisionof Experimental Hema-
tologyand CancerBiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical
Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229; e-mail: qishen.
pang@cchmc.org.
References
1. KlaunigJE,Kamendulis LM,HocevarBA. Oxida-
tivestress andoxidativedamageincarcinogen-
esis. ToxicolPathol. 2010;38(1):96-109.
2. WeissJM,GoodeEL, LadigesWC,UlrichCM.
Polymorphic variationinhOGG1andrisk of can-
cer:Areviewof thefunctionalandepidemiologic
literature. MolCarcinog.2005;42(3):127-141.
3. TanakaH,FujitaN,SugimotoR, etal. Hepaticoxida-
tiveDNAdamageisassociatedwithincreasedrisk
forhepatocellularcarcinomainchronichepatitisC.
BrJCancer.2008;98(3):580-586.
4. GottschlingBC, Maronpot RR, Hailey JR, etal.
Theroleof oxidativestressinindiumphosphide-
inducedlungcarcinogenesis inrats. ToxicolSci.
2001;64(1):28-40.
5. MugurumaM, UnamiA,KankiM, etal.Possible
involvement ofoxidativestressinpiperonylbu-
toxideinducedhepatocarcinogenesis inrats.
Toxicology.2007;236(1-2):61-75.
6. Cadet J, DoukiT, RavanatJ.Oxidatively gener-
atedbasedamagetocellularDNA. FreeRadic
BiolMed. 2010;49(1):9-21.
7. MarnettLJ. OxyradicalsandDNAdamage. Carci-
nogenesis. 2000;21(3):361-370.
8. GoodarziAA, JeggoP, LobrichM. Theinfluence
of heterochromatinonDNAdoublestrandbreak
repair:gettingthestrong,silent typetorelax.
DNARepair. 2010;9(12):1273-1282.
9. Shuck SC, ShortEA,TurchiJJ. Eukaryoticnucle-
otideexcisionrepair: fromunderstandingmecha-
nismstoinfluencingbiology. CellRes. 2008;
18(1):64-72.
10. SvilarD,GoellnerEM,AlmeidaKH,SobolRW.
Baseexcisionrepairandlesion-dependent sub-
pathwaysforrepairofoxidativeDNAdamage.
AntioxidRedox Signal. 2011;14(12):2491-507.
11. NeumannCA, KrauseDS,CarmanCV, etal. Es-
sentialrolefortheperoxiredoxinPrdx1inerythro-
cyteantioxidant defenseandtumorsuppression.
Nature.2003;424(6948):561-565.
12. Fruehauf JP,MeyskensFLJr. Reactiveoxygen
species: abreathof lifeordeath?ClinCancer
Res. 2007;13(3):789-794.
13. IshiiT, ItohK, YamamotoM. Rolesof Nrf2inacti-
vationofantioxidantenzymegenes viaantioxi-
dant responsiveelements.Methods Enzymol.
2002;348:182-190.
14. LeeJM,JohnsonJA. Animportant roleof Nrf2-
AREpathwayinthecellulardefensemechanism.
JBiochemMolBiol.2004;37(2):139-143.
15. DuW,AdamZ,RaniR,ZhangX,PangQ. Oxida-
tivestress inFanconianemiahematopoiesisand
diseaseprogression. AntioxidRedox Signal.
2008;10(11):1909-1921.
16. BagbyGC Jr. Genetic basisof Fanconianemia.
CurrOpinHematol. 2003;10(1):68-76.
17. KennedyRD,D’AndreaAD.TheFanconianemia/
BRCApathway:newfacesinthecrowd. Genes
Dev. 2005;19(24):2925-2940.
18. GreenAM, KupferGM.Fanconianemia.Hematol
OncolClinNorthAm.2009;23(2):193-214.
19. DeansAJ,West SC.DNAinterstrandcrosslink
repairandcancer. NatRev Cancer.2011;11(7):
467-480.
20. PangQ,AndreassenPR. Fanconianemiapro-
teinsandendogenous stresses.MutatRes.2009;
668(1-2):42-53.
21. LuT,PanY, KaoSY,et al.Generegulationand
DNAdamageintheageinghumanbrain. Nature.
2004;429(6994):883-891.
22. SpencerVA, SunJM,LiL, DavieJR. Chromatin
immunoprecipitation: atoolforstudyinghistone
acetylationandtranscriptionfactorbinding. Meth-
ods.2003;31(1):67-75.
23. DuW,LiJ, SippleJ,ChenJ, PangQ.Acytoplas-
micFANCA-FANCC complexinteracts andstabi-
lizestheleukemic NPMcprotein. JBiolChem.
2010;285(48):37436-37444.
24. WangX,AndreassenPR, D’AndreaAD.Func-
tional interactionof monoubiquitinatedFANCD2
andBRCA2/FANCD1inchromatin.Mol CellBiol.
2004;24(13):5850-5862.
25. BoglioloM,Cabre´ O, Calle´nE, et al.TheFanconi
anaemiagenomestability andtumor suppressor
network. Mutagenesis.2002;17(6):529-538.
26. Montes deOcaR,AndreassenPR, MargossianSP,
et al.Regulatedinteractionof theFanconiane-
miaprotein, FANCD2, withchromatin. Blood.
2005;105(3):1003-1009.
27. Athas WF,HedayatiMA,MatanoskiGM,FarmerER,
GrossmanL.Developmentandfieldtestvalida-
tionofanassay forDNArepairincirculatinghu-
manlymphocytes.Cancer Res.1991;51(21):
5786-5793.
28. Muchardt C, Yaniv M. WhentheSWI/SNF com-
plex remodels thecellcycle.Oncogene. 2001;
20(24):3067-3075.
29. KadamS,EmersonBM.Transcriptionalspecificityof
humanSWI/SNFBRG1andBRMchromatinremod-
elingcomplexes.MolCell.2003;11(2):377-389.
30. OtsukiT,FurukawaY,IkedaK,et al. Fanconi
anemiaprotein,FANCA, associates withBRG1, a
component ofthehumanSWI/SNFcomplex.
HumMolGenet.2001;10(23):2651-2660.
31. ForsbergEC,Downs KM,ChristensenHM, Im H,
NuzziPA, BresnickEH. Developmentallydy-
namic histoneacetylationpatternofatissue-
specific chromatindomain. Proc NatlAcadSci
US A. 2000;97(26):14494-14499.
32. JenuweinT,Allis CD. Translatingthehistone
code. Science.2001;293(5532):1074-1080.
33. ThomasS,GreenA, Sturm NR, CampbellDA,
MylerPJ. Histoneacetylationmarkorigins of
polycistronictranscriptioninLeishmaniamajor.
BMCGenomics. 2009;10:152-166.
34. GhoshR,MitchellDL.Effect of oxidativeDNA
damageinpromoterelementsontranscription
factorbinding. NucleicAcids Res. 1999;27(15):
3213-3218.
35. Park SJ,CicconeSL, BeckBD, etal. Oxidative
stress/damageinduces multimerizationandinter-
actionofFanconianemiaproteins.J BiolChem.
2004;279(29):30053-30059.
36. CummingRC,LiuJM,YoussoufianH,BuchwaldM.
Suppressionofapoptosis inhematopoietic factor-
dependent progenitorcelllinesbyexpressionof
theFAC gene. Blood.1996;88(12):4558-4567.
37. Kruyt FA,HoshinoT,LiuJM,JosephP, JaiswalAK,
YoussoufianH.Abnormalmicrosomaldetoxifica-
tionimplicatedinFanconianemiagroupCbyin-
teractionoftheFAC proteinwithNADPHcyto-
chromeP450reductase. Blood.1998;92(9):3050-
3056.
38. HadjurS, UngK,WadsworthL, et al.Defective
hematopoiesis andhepaticsteatosis inmicewith
combineddeficiencies ofthegenesencoding
FanccandCu/Znsuperoxidedismutase.Blood.
2001;98(4):1003-1011.
39. SaadatzadehMR,Bijangi-VishehsaraeiK,HongP,
BergmannH, HanelineLS.Oxidanthypersensi-
tivityof Fanconi anemiatypeC-deficientcells is
dependent onaredox-regulatedapoptotic path-
way. JBiolChem. 2004;279(16):16805-16812.
40. FutakiM,IgarashiT, WatanabeS, et al.The
FANCG Fanconianemiaproteininteracts with
CYP2E1:possibleroleinprotectionagainstoxi-
dativeDNAdamage. Carcinogenesis.2002;
23(1):67-72.
41. Mukhopadhyay SS, LeungKS,HicksMJ,
Hastings PJ,YoussoufianH, PlonSE. Defective
mitochondrialperoxiredoxin-3results insensitiv-
itytooxidativestress inFanconianemiaJCell
Biol. 2006;175(2):225-235.
42. Li J,DuW, MaynardS,AndreassenPR, PangQ.
Oxidativestress-specificinteractionbetween
FANCD2andFOXO3a.Blood.2010;115(8):1545-
1548.
43. ZhangJ,OhtaT, MaruyamaA, etal. BRG1inter-
acts withNrf2toselectivelymediateHO-1induc-
tioninresponsetooxidativestress. MolCellBiol.
2006;26(21):7942-7952.
44. HuangM,QianF, HuY,AngC, LiZ, WenZ.
Chromatin-remodelingfactorBRG1selectively
activatesasubset ofinterferon-alpha-inducible
genes. NatCell Biol. 2002;4(10):774-781.
45. MenoniH, GasparuttoD,HamicheA, etal.ATP-
dependentchromatinremodelingisrequiredforbase
excisionrepairinconventionalbutnotinvariantH2A.
MolCellBiol.2007;27(17):5949-5956.
46. Lukas J, LukasC, BartekJ. Morethanjust afo-
cus: thechromatinresponsetoDNAdamageand
itsroleingenomeintegrity maintenance.Nat Cell
Biol. 2011;13(10):1161-1169.
FAPATHWAYPROTECTSANTIOXIDANTDEFENSE GENES
4151
BLOOD,3 MAY 2012
VOLUME119, NUMBER18
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested