<input type="submit" value="Clear the abusive users list"> 
END; 
Example 8-8
prints out information about current user page view counts and the current 
abusive user list, as shown in Figure 8-1
. It also lets you add or remove specific users from 
the list and clear the whole list.  
Figure 8-1. Abusive users 
When it removes users from the abusive users list, instead of:  
unset($abuse->data['abusive_users'][$_REQUEST['user']])  
it sets the following to 0: 
$abuse->data['abusive_users'][$_REQUEST['user']]  
Pdf editable fields - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
add editable fields to pdf; adding image to pdf form
Pdf editable fields - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
add text fields to pdf; change text size pdf form
This still causes 
check_abuse( )
to return 
false
, but it allows the page to explicitly note 
that the user was on the abusive users list but was removed. This is helpful to know in case a 
user that was removed starts causing trouble again.  
When a user is added to the abusive users list, instead of recording a pageview count, the 
script records the time the user was added. This is helpful in tracking down who or why the 
user was manually added to the list.  
If you deploy 
pc_Web_Abuse_Check
and this maintenance page on your server, make sure 
that the maintenance page is protected by a password or otherwise inaccessible to the general 
public. Obviously, this code isn't very helpful if abusive users can remove themselves from the 
list of abusive users. 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
cannot save pdf form in reader; android edit pdf forms
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load
adding images to pdf forms; chrome save pdf with fields
Chapter 9. Forms 
Section 9.1.  Introduction
Recipe 9.2.  Processing Form Input
Recipe 9.3.  Validating Form Input
Recipe 9.4.  Working with Multipage Forms
Recipe 9.5.  Redisplaying Forms with Preserved Information and Error Messages
Recipe 9.6.  Guarding Against Multiple Submission of the Same Form
Recipe 9.7.  Processing Uploaded Files
Recipe 9.8.  Securing PHP's Form Processing
Recipe 9.9.  Escaping Control Characters from User Data
Recipe 9.10.  Handling Remote Variables with Periods in Their Names
Recipe 9.11.  Using Form Elements with Multiple Options
Recipe 9.12.  Creating Dropdown Menus Based on the Current Date
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
hardly edit PDF document. Under this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word document.
adding text fields to a pdf; change font size in pdf form
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text
adding a text field to a pdf; chrome pdf save form data
9.1 Introduction 
The genius of PHP is its seamless integration of form variables into your programs. It makes 
web programming smooth and simple, from web form to PHP code to HTML output.  
There's no built-in mechanism in HTTP to allow you to save information from one page so you 
can access it in other pages. That's because HTTP is a stateless protocol. Recipe 9.2
Recipe 
9.4
Recipe 9.5
, and Recipe 9.6
all show ways to work around the fundamental problem of 
figuring out which user is making which requests to your web server.  
Processing data from the user is the other main topic of this chapter. You should never trust 
the data coming from the browser, so it's imperative to always validate all fields, even hidden 
form elements. Validation takes many forms, from ensuring the data match certain criteria, as 
discussed in Recipe 9.3
, to escaping HTML entities to allow the safe display of user entered 
data, as covered in Recipe 9.9
. Furthermore, Recipe 9.8
tells how to protect the security of 
your web server, and Recipe 9.7
covers how to process files uploaded by a user.  
Whenever PHP processes a page, it checks for GET and POST form variables, uploaded files, 
applicable cookies, and web server and environment variables. These are then directly 
accessible in the following arrays: 
$_GET
$_POST
$_FILES
$_COOKIE
$_SERVER
, and 
$_ENV
. They hold, respectively, all variables set by GET requests, POST requests, uploaded 
files, cookies, the web server, and the environment. There's also 
$_REQUEST
, which is one 
giant array that contains the values from the other six arrays.  
When placing elements inside of 
$_REQUEST
, if two arrays both have a key with the same 
name, PHP falls back upon the 
variables_order
configuration directive. By default, 
variables_order
is 
EGPCS
(or 
GPCS
, if you're using the php.ini-recommended configuration 
file). So, PHP first adds environment variables to 
$_REQUEST
and then adds GET, POST, 
cookie, and web server variables to the array, in this order. For instance, since 
C
comes after 
P
in the default order, a cookie named 
username
overwrites a POST variable named 
username
 
If you don't have access to PHP's configuration files, you can use 
ini_get( )
to check a 
setting:  
print ini_get('variables_order'); 
EGPCS 
You may need to do this because your ISP doesn't let you view configuration settings or 
because your script may run on someone else's server. You can also use 
phpinfo( )
to view 
settings. However, if you can't rely on the value of 
variables_order
, you should directly 
access 
$_GET
and 
$_POST
instead of using 
$_REQUEST
.  
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
change font on pdf form; pdf fillable form creator
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
change pdf to fillable form; add signature field to pdf
The arrays containing external variables, such as 
$_REQUEST
, are superglobals. As such, they 
don't need to be declared as 
global
inside of a function or class. It also means you probably 
shouldn't assign anything to these variables, or you'll overwrite the data stored in them.  
Prior to PHP 4.1, these superglobal variables didn't exist. Instead there were regular arrays 
named 
$HTTP_COOKIE_VARS
$HTTP_ENV_VARS
$HTTP_GET_VARS
$HTTP_POST_VARS
$HTTP_POST_FILES
, and 
$HTTP_SERVER_VARS
. These arrays are still available for legacy 
reasons, but the newer arrays are easier to work with. These older arrays are populated only if 
the 
track_vars
configuration directive is 
on
, but, as of PHP 4.0.3, this feature is always 
enabled.  
Finally, if the 
register_globals
configuration directive is 
on
, all these variables are also 
available as variables in the global namespace. So, 
$_GET['password']
is also just 
$password
. While convenient, this introduces major security problems because malicious 
users can easily set variables from the outside and overwrite trusted internal variables. 
Starting with PHP 4.2, 
register_globals
defaults to 
off
.  
With this knowledge, here is a basic script to put things together. The form asks the user to 
enter his first name, then replies with a welcome message. The HTML for the form looks like 
this:  
<form action="/hello.php" method="post"> 
What is your first name? 
<input type="text" name="first_name"> 
<input type="submit" value="Say Hello"> 
</form> 
The 
name
of the text 
input
element inside the form is 
first_name
. Also, the 
method
of the 
form is 
post
. This means that when the form is submitted, 
$_POST['first_name']
will 
hold whatever string the user typed in. (It could also be empty, of course, if he didn't type 
anything.)  
For simplicity, however, let's assume the value in the variable is valid. (The term "valid" is 
open for definition, depending on certain criteria, such as not being empty, not being an 
attempt to break into the system, etc.) This allows us to omit the error checking stage, which 
is important but gets in the way of this simple example. So, here is a simple hello.php script to 
process the form:  
echo 'Hello ' . $_POST['first_name'] . '!'; 
If the user's first name is Joe, PHP prints out: 
Hello Joe! 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents
pdf form save in reader; pdf forms save
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual Basic .NET class
change text size pdf form; add fields to pdf form
Recipe 9.2 Processing Form Input 
9.2.1 Problem 
You want to use the same HTML page to emit a form and then process the data entered into 
it. In other words, you're trying to avoid a proliferation of pages that each handle different 
steps in a transaction.  
9.2.2 Solution 
Use a hidden field in the form to tell your program that it's supposed to be processing the 
form. In this case, the hidden field is named 
stage
and has a value of 
process
:  
if (isset($_POST['stage']) && ('process' == $_POST['stage'])) { 
process_form(); 
} else { 
print_form(); 
9.2.3 Discussion 
During the early days of the Web, when people created forms, they made two pages: a static 
HTML page with the form and a script that processed the form and returned a dynamically 
generated response to the user. This was a little unwieldy, because form.html led to form.cgi 
and if you changed one page, you needed to also remember to edit the other, or your script 
might break.  
Forms are easier to maintain when all parts live in the same file and context dictates which 
sections to display. Use a hidden form field named 
stage
to track your position in the flow of 
the form process; it acts as a trigger for the steps that return the proper HTML to the user. 
Sometimes, however, it's not possible to design your code to do this; for example, when your 
form is processed by a script on someone else's server.  
When writing the HTML for your form, however, don't hardcode the path to your page directly 
into the 
action
. This makes it impossible to rename or relocate your page without also 
editing it. Instead, PHP supplies a helpful variable:  
$_SERVER['PHP_SELF']  
This variable is an alias to the URL of the current page. So, set the value of the 
action
attribute to that value, and your form always resubmits, even if you've moved the file to a 
new place on the server.  
So, the example in the introduction of this chapter is now: 
if (isset($_POST['stage']) && ('process' == $_POST['stage'])) { 
process_form(); 
} else { 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET control to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB. Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF.
adding text field to pdf; create a fillable pdf form online
print_form(); 
function print_form() { 
echo <<<END 
<form action="$_SERVER[PHP_SELF]" method="post"> 
What is your first name? 
<input type="text" name="first_name"> 
<input type="hidden" name="stage" value="process"> 
<input type="submit" value="Say Hello"> 
</form> 
END; 
function process_form() { 
echo 'Hello ' . $_POST['first_name'] . '!'; 
If your form has more than one step, just set 
stage
to a new value for each step.  
9.2.4 See Also 
Recipe 9.4
for handling multipage forms. 
Recipe 9.3 Validating Form Input 
9.3.1 Problem 
You want to ensure data entered from a form passes certain criteria.  
9.3.2 Solution 
Create a function that takes a string to validate and returns 
true
if the string passes a check 
and 
false
if it doesn't. Inside the function, use regular expressions and comparisons to check 
the data. For example, Example 9-1
shows the 
pc_validate_zipcode( )
function, which 
validates a U.S. Zip Code.  
Example 9-1. pc_validate_zipcode( )  
function pc_validate_zipcode($zipcode) { 
return preg_match('/^[0-9]{5}([- ]?[0-9]{4})?$/', $zipcode); 
Here's how to use it: 
if (pc_validate_zipcode($_REQUEST['zipcode'])) { 
// U.S. Zip Code is okay, can proceed 
process_data(); 
} else { 
// this is not an okay Zip Code, print an error message 
print "Your ZIP Code is should be 5 digits (or 9 digits, if you're "; 
print "using ZIP+4)."; 
print_form(); 
9.3.3 Discussion 
Deciding what constitutes valid and invalid data is almost more of a philosophical task than a 
straightforward matter of following a series of fixed steps. In many cases, what may be 
perfectly fine in one situation won't be correct in another.  
The easiest check is making sure the field isn't blank. The 
empty( )
function best handles 
this problem.  
Next come relatively easy checks, such as the case of a U.S. Zip Code. Usually, a regular 
expression or two can solve these problems. For example:  
/^[0-9]{5}([- ]?[0-9]{4})?$/  
finds all valid U.S. Zip Codes. 
Sometimes, however, coming up with the correct regular expression is difficult. If you want to 
verify that someone has entered only two names, such as "Alfred Aho," you can check 
against:  
/^[A-Za-z]+ +[A-Za-z]+$/ 
However, Tim O'Reilly can't pass this test. An alternative is 
/^\S+\s+\S+$/
; but then Donald 
E. Knuth is rejected. So think carefully about the entire range of valid input before writing 
your regular expression.  
In some instances, even with regular expressions, it becomes difficult to check if the field is 
legal. One particularly popular and tricky task is validating an email address, as discussed in 
Recipe 13.7
. Another is how to make sure a user has correctly entered the name of her U.S. 
state. You can check against a listing of names, but what if she enters her postal service 
abbreviation? Will MA instead of Massachusetts work? What about Mass.?  
One way to avoid this issue is to present the user with a dropdown list of pregenerated 
choices. Using a 
select
element, users are forced by the form's design to select a state in 
the format that always works, which can reduce errors. This, however, presents another series 
of difficulties. What if the user lives some place that isn't one of the choices? What if the range 
of choices is so large this isn't a feasible solution?  
There are a number of ways to solve these types of problems. First, you can provide an 
"other" option in the list, so that a non-U.S. user can successfully complete the form. 
(Otherwise, she'll probably just pick a place at random, so she can continue using your site.) 
Next, you can divide the registration process into a two-part sequence. For a long list of 
options, a user begins by picking the letter of the alphabet his choice begins with; then, a new 
page provides him with a list containing only the choices beginning with that letter.  
Finally, there are even trickier problems. What do you do when you want to make sure the 
user has correctly entered information, but you don't want to tell her you did so? A situation 
where this is important is a sweepstakes; in a sweepstakes, there's often a special code box 
on the entry form in which a user enters a string — 
AD78DQ
— from an email or flier she's 
received. You want to make sure there are no typos, or your program won't count her as a 
valid entrant. You also don't want to allow her to just guess codes, because then she could try 
out those codes and crack the system.  
The solution is to have two input boxes. A user enters her code twice; if the two fields match, 
you accept the data as legal and then (silently) validate the data. If the fields don't match, 
you reject the entry and have the user fix it. This procedure eliminates typos and doesn't 
reveal how the code validation algorithm works; it can also prevent misspelled email 
addresses.  
Finally, PHP performs server-side validation. Server-side validation requires that a request be 
made to the server, and a page returned in response; as a result, it can be slow. It's also 
possible to do client-side validation using JavaScript. While client-side validation is faster, it 
exposes your code to the user and may not work if the client doesn't support JavaScript or has 
disabled it. Therefore, you should always duplicate all client-side validation code on the server.  
9.3.4 See Also 
Recipe 13.7
for a regular expression for validating email addresses; Chapter 7
, "Validation on 
the Server and Client," of Web Database Applications with PHP and MySQL (Hugh Williams and 
David Lane, O'Reilly). 
Recipe 9.4 Working with Multipage Forms 
9.4.1 Problem 
You want to use a form that displays more than one page and preserve data from one page to 
the next.  
9.4.2 Solution 
Use session tracking:  
session_start(); 
$_SESSION['username'] = $_GET['username']; 
You can also include variables from a form's earlier pages as hidden input fields in its later 
pages:  
<input type="hidden" name="username"  
value="<?php echo htmlentities($_GET['username']); ?>"> 
9.4.3 Discussion 
Whenever possible, use session tracking. It's more secure because users can't modify session 
variables. To begin a session, call 
session_start( )
; this creates a new session or resumes 
an existing one. Note that this step is unnecessary if you've enabled 
session.auto_start
in your php.ini file. Variables assigned to 
$_SESSION
are automatically propagated. In the 
Solution example, the form's username variable is preserved by assigning 
$_GET['username']
to 
$_SESSION['username']
.  
To access this value on a subsequent request, call 
session_start( )
and then check 
$_SESSION['username']
 
session_start( ); 
$username = htmlentities($_SESSION['username']); 
print "Hello $username."; 
In this case, if you don't call 
session_start( )
$_SESSION
isn't set.  
Be sure to secure the server and location where your session files are located (the filesystem, 
database, etc.); otherwise your system will be vulnerable to identity spoofing.  
If session tracking isn't enabled for your PHP installation, you can use hidden form variables as 
a replacement. However, passing data using hidden form elements isn't secure because 
anyone can edit these fields and fake a request; with a little work, you can increase the 
security to a reliable level.  
The most basic way to use hidden fields is to include them inside your form.  
<form action="<?php echo $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']; ?>" 
method="get"> 
<input type="hidden" name="username"  
value="<?php echo htmlentities($_GET['username']); ?>"> 
When this form is resubmitted, 
$_GET['username']
holds its previous value unless someone 
has modified it.  
A more complex but secure solution is to convert your variables to a string using 
serialize( 
)
, compute a secret hash of the data, and place both pieces of information in the form. Then, 
on the next request, validate the data and unserialize it. If it fails the validation test, you'll 
know someone has tried to modify the information.  
The 
pc_encode( )
encoding function shown in Example 9-2
takes the data to encode in the 
form of an array.  
Example 9-2. pc_encode( )  
$secret = 'Foo25bAr52baZ'; 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested