open source pdf to image converter c# : Change font on pdf form application SDK tool html winforms web page online 526-part585

formatted date string, etc.) means a string that contains some particular grouping of time and 
date parts, for example "2002-03-12," "Wednesday, 11:23 A.M.," or "February 25."  
If you used epoch timestamps as your internal time representation, you avoided any Y2K 
issues, because the difference between 946702799 (1999-12-31 23:59:59 UTC) and 
946702800 (2000-01-01 00:00:00 UTC) is treated just like the difference between any other 
two timestamps. You may, however, run into a Y2038 problem. January 19, 2038 at 3:14:07 
A.M. (UTC) is 2147483647 seconds after midnight January 1, 1970. What's special about 
2147483647? It's 2
31
- 1, which is the largest integer expressible when 32 bits represent a 
signed integer. (The 32nd bit is used for the sign.)  
The solution? At some point before January 19, 2038, make sure you trade up to hardware 
that uses, say, a 64-bit quantity for time storage. This buys you about another 292 billion 
years. (Just 39 bits would be enough to last you until about 10680, well after the impact of 
the Y10K bug has leveled the Earth's cold fusion factories and faster-than-light travel 
stations.) 2038 might seem far off right now, but so did 2000 to COBOL programmers in the 
1950s and 1960s. Don't repeat their mistake!  
Recipe 3.2 Finding the Current Date and Time 
3.2.1 Problem 
You want to know what the time or date is. 
3.2.2 Solution 
Use 
strftime( )
or 
date( )
for a formatted time string:  
print strftime('%c'); 
print date('r'); 
Mon Aug 12 18:23:45 2002 
Mon, 12 Aug 2002 18:23:45 -0400 
Use 
getdate( )
or 
localtime( )
if you want time parts:  
$now_1 = getdate( ); 
$now_2 = localtime( ); 
print "$now_1[hours]:$now_1[minutes]:$now_1[seconds]"; 
print "$now_2[2]:$now_2[1]:$now_2[0]"; 
18:23:45 
18:23:45 
3.2.3 Discussion 
The functions 
strftime( )
and 
date( )
can produce a variety of formatted time and date 
strings. They are discussed in more detail in Recipe 3.5
. Both 
localtime( )
and 
getdate( 
)
, on the other hand, return arrays whose elements are the different pieces of the specified 
date and time.  
Change font on pdf form - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
change font size in pdf form; convert word doc to pdf with editable fields
Change font on pdf form - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
chrome pdf save form data; create a form in pdf from word
The associative array 
getdate( )
returns has the key/value pairs listed in Table 3-1
.  
Table 3-1. Return array from getdate( )  
Key 
Value 
seconds
Seconds 
minutes
Minutes 
hours
Hours 
mday
Day of the month 
wday
Day of the week, numeric (Sunday is 0, Saturday is 6) 
mon
Month, numeric 
year
Year, numeric 
yday
Day of the year, numeric (e.g., 299) 
weekday
Day of the week, textual, full (e.g., "Friday")  
month
Month, textual, full (e.g., "January")  
For example, here's how to use 
getdate( )
to print out the month, day, and year:  
$a = getdate( ); 
printf('%s %d, %d',$a['month'],$a['mday'],$a['year']); 
August 7, 2002 
Pass 
getdate( )
an epoch timestamp as an argument to make the returned array the 
appropriate values for local time at that timestamp. For example, the month, day, and year at 
epoch timestamp 163727100 is:  
$a = getdate(163727100); 
printf('%s %d, %d',$a['month'],$a['mday'],$a['year']); 
March 10, 1975 
The function 
localtime( )
returns an array of time and date parts. It also takes an epoch 
timestamp as an optional first argument, as well as a boolean as an optional second 
argument. If that second argument is 
true
localtime( )
returns an associative array 
instead of a numerically indexed array. The keys of that array are the same as the members 
of the 
tm_struct
structure that the C function 
localtime( )
returns, as shown in Table 3-
2
.  
Table 3-2. Return array from localtime( )  
Numeric position 
Key 
Value 
0
tm_sec
Second 
1
tm_min
Minutes 
2
tm_hour
Hour 
3
tm_mday
Day of the month 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression
add form fields to pdf online; change font size in pdf fillable form
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce font resources: Font resources will also take up too Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing 150.0F 'to change image compression
change text size pdf form; acrobat create pdf form
4
tm_mon
Month of the year (January is 0) 
5
tm_year
Years since 1900 
6
tm_wday
Day of the week 
7
tm_yday
Day of the year 
8
tm_isdst
Is daylight saving time in effect? 
For example, here's how to use 
localtime( )
to print out today's date in month/day/year 
format:  
$a = localtime( ); 
$a[4] += 1; 
$a[5] += 1900; 
print "$a[4]/$a[3]/$a[5]"; 
8/7/2002 
The month is incremented by 1 before printing since 
localtime( )
starts counting months 
with 0 for January, but we want to display 
1
if the current month is January. Similarly, the 
year is incremented by 1900 because 
localtime( )
starts counting years with 0 for 1900.  
Like 
getdate( )
localtime( )
accepts an epoch timestamp as an optional first argument 
to produce time parts for that timestamp:  
$a = localtime(163727100); 
$a[4] += 1; 
$a[5] += 1900; 
print "$a[4]/$a[3]/$a[5]"; 
3/10/1975 
3.2.4 See Also 
Documentation on 
strftime( )
at http://www.php.net/strftime
date( )
at 
http://www.php.net/date
getdate( )
at http://www.php.net/getdate
, and 
localtime( )
at http://www.php.net/localtime
.  
Recipe 3.3 Converting Time and Date Parts to an Epoch Timestamp 
3.3.1 Problem 
You want to know what epoch timestamp corresponds to a set of time and date parts.  
3.3.2 Solution 
Use 
mktime( )
if your time and date parts are in the local time zone:  
// 7:45:03 PM on March 10, 1975, local time 
$then = mktime(19,45,3,3,10,1975); 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
add image to pdf form; change tab order in pdf form
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
cannot save pdf form in reader; add form fields to pdf without acrobat
Use 
gmmktime( )
if your time and date parts are in GMT:  
// 7:45:03 PM on March 10, 1975, in GMT 
$then = gmmktime(19,45,3,3,10,1975); 
Pass no arguments to get the current date and time in the local or UTC time zone:  
$now = mktime(); 
$now_utc = gmmktime(); 
3.3.3 Discussion 
The functions 
mktime( )
and 
gmmktime( )
each take a date and time's parts (hour, minute, 
second, month, day, year, DST flag) and return the appropriate Unix epoch timestamp. The 
components are treated as local time by 
mktime( )
, while 
gmmktime( )
treats them as a 
date and time in UTC. For both functions, a seventh argument, the DST flag (1 if DST is being 
observed, 0 if not), is optional. These functions return sensible results only for times within 
the epoch. Most systems store epoch timestamps in a 32-bit signed integer, so "within the 
epoch" means between 8:45:51 P.M. December 13, 1901 UTC and 3:14:07 A.M. January 19, 
2038 UTC.  
In the following example, 
$stamp_now
is the epoch timestamp when 
mktime( )
is called and 
$stamp_future
is the epoch timestamp for 3:25 P.M. on June 4, 2012:  
$stamp_now = mktime( ); 
$stamp_future = mktime(15,25,0,6,4,2012); 
print $stamp_now; 
print $stamp_future; 
1028782421 
1338837900 
Both epoch timestamps can be fed back to 
strftime( )
to produce formatted time strings:  
print strftime('%c',$stamp_now); 
print strftime('%c',$stamp_future); 
Thu Aug  8 00:53:41 2002 
Mon Jun 4 15:25:00 2012 
Because the previous calls to 
mktime( )
were made on a computer set to EDT (which is four 
hours behind GMT), using 
gmmktime( )
instead produces epoch timestamps that are 14400 
seconds (four hours) smaller:  
$stamp_now = gmmktime( ); 
$stamp_future = gmmktime(15,25,0,6,4,2012); 
print $stamp_now; 
print $stamp_future; 
1028768021 
1338823500 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. passwordSetting.IsHighReso = True ' Allow to change document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
pdf form creator; add text field pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. passwordSetting.IsHighReso = true; // Allow to change document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
add submit button to pdf form; create a pdf form
Feeding these 
gmmktime( )
-generated epoch timestamps back to 
strftime( )
produces 
formatting time strings that are also four hours earlier:  
print strftime('%c',$stamp_now); 
print strftime('%c',$stamp_future); 
Wed Aug  7 20:53:41 2002 
Mon Jun 4 11:25:00 2012 
3.3.4 See Also 
Recipe 3.4
for how to convert an epoch timestamp back to time and date parts; 
documentation on 
mktime( )
at http://www.php.net/mktime
and 
gmmktime( )
at 
http://www.php.net/gmmktime
.  
Recipe 3.4 Converting an Epoch Timestamp to Time and Date Parts 
3.4.1 Problem 
You want the set of time and date parts that corresponds to an epoch timestamp.  
3.4.2 Solution 
Pass an epoch timestamp to 
getdate( )
 
$time_parts = getdate(163727100); 
3.4.3 Discussion 
The time parts returned by 
getdate( )
are detailed in Table 3-1
. These time parts are in 
local time. If you want time parts in another time zone corresponding to a particular epoch 
timestamp, see Recipe 3.12
 
3.4.4 See Also 
Recipe 3.3
for how to convert time and date parts back to epoch timestamps; Recipe 3.12
for 
how to deal with time zones; documentation on 
getdate( )
at http://www.php.net/getdate
.  
Recipe 3.5 Printing a Date or Time in a Specified Format 
3.5.1 Problem 
You need to print out a date or time formatted in a particular way.  
3.5.2 Solution 
Use 
date( )
or 
strftime( )
print strftime('%c'); 
Annotate, Redact Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Click "Font" to change annotations font color, size We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf
add an image to a pdf form; create pdf forms
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
create a pdf form that can be filled out; change font in pdf form
print date('m/d/Y'); 
Tue Jul 30 11:31:08 2002 
07/30/2002 
3.5.3 Discussion 
Both 
date( )
and 
strftime( )
are flexible functions that can produce a formatted time 
string with a variety of components. The formatting characters for these functions are listed in 
Table 3-3
. The Windows column indicates whether the formatting character is supported by 
strftime( )
on Windows systems.  
Table 3-3. strftime( ) and date( ) format characters  
Type 
strftime( 
date( 
Description 
Range 
Windows 
Hour 
%H
H
Hour, numeric, 24-hour clock 
00-23 
Yes 
Hour 
%I
h
Hour, numeric, 12-hour clock 
01-12 
Yes 
Hour 
%k
Hour, numeric, 24-hour clock, 
leading zero as space 
0-23 
No 
Hour 
%l
Hour, numeric, 12-hour clock, 
leading zero as space 
1-12 
No 
Hour 
%p
A
AM or PM designation for current 
locale 
Yes 
Hour 
%P
a
am/pm designation for current 
locale 
No 
Hour 
G
Hour, numeric, 24-hour clock, 
leading zero trimmed 
0-23 
No 
Hour 
g
Hour, numeric, 12-hour clock, 
leading zero trimmed 
0-1 
No 
Minute 
%M
I
Minute, numeric 
00-59 
Yes 
Second 
%S
s
Second, numeric 
00-61
[1]
Yes 
Day 
%d
d
Day of the month, numeric 
01-31 
Yes 
Day 
%e
Day of the month, numeric, leading 
zero as space 
1-31 
No 
Day 
%j
z
Day of the year, numeric 
001-366 for 
strftime( )
0-365 for 
date( )
Yes 
Day 
%u
Day of the week, numeric (Monday 
is 1) 
1-7 
No 
Day 
%w
w
Day of the week, numeric (Sunday 
is 0) 
0-6 
Yes 
Day 
j
Day of the month, numeric, leading  1-31 
No 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
add email button to pdf form; adding text to a pdf form
zero trimmed 
Day 
S
English ordinal suffix for day of the 
month, textual 
"st," "th," "nd," 
"rd"  
No 
Week 
%a
D
Abbreviated weekday name, text for 
current locale 
Yes 
Week 
%A
l
Full weekday name, text for current 
locale 
Yes 
Week 
%U
Week number in the year; numeric; 
first Sunday is the first day of the 
first week  
00-53 
Yes 
Week 
%V
W
ISO 8601:1988 week number in the 
year; numeric; week 1 is the first 
week that has at least 4 days in the 
current year; Monday is the first day 
of the week  
01-53 
No 
Week 
%W
Week number in the year; numeric; 
first Monday is the first day of the 
first week  
00-53 
Yes 
Month 
%B
F
Full month name, text for current 
locale 
Yes 
Month 
%b
M
Abbreviated month name, text for 
current locale 
Yes 
Month 
%h
Same as 
%b
No 
Month 
%m
m
Month, numeric 
01-12 
Yes 
Month 
n
Month, numeric, leading zero 
trimmed 
1-12 
No 
Month 
t
Month length in days, numeric 
28, 29, 30, 31  No 
Year 
%C
Century, numeric 
00-99 
No 
Year 
%g
Like 
%G
, but without the century 
00-99 
No 
Year 
%G
ISO 8601 year with century; 
numeric; the four-digit year 
corresponding to the ISO week 
number; same as 
%y
except if the 
ISO week number belongs to the 
previous or next year, that year is 
used instead  
No 
Year 
%y
y
Year without century, numeric 
00-99 
Yes 
Year 
%Y
Y
Year, numeric, including century 
Yes 
Year 
L
Leap year flag (yes is 1) 
0, 1 
No 
Timezone 
%z
O
Hour offset from GMT, +/-HHMM 
-1200-+1200  Yes, but 
(e.g., -0400, +0230) 
acts like 
%Z
Timezone 
%Z
T
Time zone, name, or abbreviation; 
textual 
Yes 
Timezone 
I
Daylight saving time flag (yes is 1)  0, 1 
No 
Timezone 
Z
Seconds offset from GMT; west of 
GMT is negative, east of GMT is 
positive  
-43200-43200  No 
Compound 
%c
Standard date and time format for 
current locale 
Yes 
Compound 
%D
Same as 
%m/%d/%y
No 
Compound 
%F
Same as 
%Y-%m-%d
No 
Compound 
%r
Time in AM or PM notation for 
current locale 
No 
Compound 
%R
Time in 24-hour notation for current 
locale 
No 
Compound 
%T
Time in 24-hour notation (same as 
%H:%M:%S
No 
Compound 
%x
Standard date format for current 
locale(without time) 
Yes 
Compound 
%X
Standard time format for current 
locale(without date) 
Yes 
Compound 
r
RFC 822 formatted date (e.g., "Thu, 
22 Aug 2002 16:01:07 +0200")  
No 
Other 
%s
U
Seconds since the epoch 
No 
Other 
B
Swatch Internet time 
No 
Formatting 
%%
Literal 
%
character 
Yes 
Formatting 
%n
Newline character 
No 
Formatting 
%t
Tab character 
No 
[1]
The range for seconds extends to 61 to account for leap seconds. 
The first argument to each function is a format string, and the second argument is an epoch 
timestamp. If you leave out the second argument, both functions default to the current date 
and time. While 
date( )
and 
strftime( )
operate over local time, they each have UTC-
centric counterparts (
gmdate( )
and 
gmstrftime( )
).  
The formatting characters for 
date( )
are PHP-specific, but 
strftime( )
uses the C-library 
strftime( )
function. This may make 
strftime( )
more understandable to someone 
coming to PHP from another language, but it also makes its behavior slightly different on 
various platforms. Windows doesn't support as many 
strftime( )
formatting commands as 
most Unix-based systems. Also, 
strftime( )
expects its formatting characters to each be 
preceded by a 
%
(think 
printf( )
), so it's easier to produce strings with lots of interpolated 
time and date values in them.  
For example, at 12:49 P.M. on July 15, 2002, the code to print out: 
It's after 12 pm on July 15, 2002 
with 
strftime( )
looks like: 
print strftime("It's after %I %P on %B %d, %Y"); 
With 
date( )
it looks like: 
print "It's after ".date('h a').' on '.date('F d, Y'); 
Non-date-related characters in a format string are fine for 
strftime( )
, because it looks for 
the 
%
character to decide where to interpolate the appropriate time information. However, 
date( )
doesn't have such a delimiter, so about the only extras you can tuck into the 
formatting string are spaces and punctuation. If you pass 
strftime( )
's formatting string to 
date( )
 
print date("It's after %I %P on %B%d, %Y"); 
you'd almost certainly not want what you'd get:  
131'44 pmf31eMon, 15 Jul 2002 12:49:44 -0400 %1 %P o7 %742%15, %2002 
To generate time parts with 
date( )
that are easy to interpolate, group all time and date 
parts from 
date( )
into one string, separating the different components with a delimiter that 
date( )
won't translate into anything and that isn't itself part of one of your substrings. 
Then, using 
explode( )
with that delimiter character, put each piece of the return value 
from 
date( )
in an array, which is easily interpolated in your output string:  
$ar = explode(':',date("h a:F d, Y")); 
print "It's after $ar[0] on $ar[1]"; 
3.5.4 See Also 
Documentation on 
date( )
at http://www.php.net/date
and 
strftime( )
at 
http://www.php.net/strftime
; on Unix-based systems, man strftime for your system-specific 
strftime( )
options; on Windows, see 
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-
us/vclib/html/_crt_strftime.2c_.wcsftime.asp
for 
strftime( )
details.  
Recipe 3.6 Finding the Difference of Two Dates 
3.6.1 Problem 
You want to find the elapsed time between two dates. For example, you want to tell a user 
how long it's been since she last logged onto your site.  
3.6.2 Solution 
Convert both dates to epoch timestamps and subtract one from the other. Use this code to 
separate the difference into weeks, days, hours, minutes, and seconds:  
// 7:32:56 pm on May 10, 1965 
$epoch_1 = mktime(19,32,56,5,10,1965); 
// 4:29:11 am on November 20, 1962 
$epoch_2 = mktime(4,29,11,11,20,1962); 
$diff_seconds  = $epoch_1 - $epoch_2; 
$diff_weeks    = floor($diff_seconds/604800); 
$diff_seconds -= $diff_weeks   * 604800; 
$diff_days     = floor($diff_seconds/86400); 
$diff_seconds -= $diff_days    * 86400; 
$diff_hours    = floor($diff_seconds/3600); 
$diff_seconds -= $diff_hours   * 3600; 
$diff_minutes  = floor($diff_seconds/60); 
$diff_seconds -= $diff_minutes * 60; 
print "The two dates have $diff_weeks weeks, $diff_days days, "; 
print "$diff_hours hours, $diff_minutes minutes, and $diff_seconds "; 
print "seconds elapsed between them."; 
The two dates have 128 weeks, 6 days, 14 hours, 3 minutes,  
and 45 seconds elapsed between them. 
Note that the difference isn't divided into larger chunks than weeks (i.e., months or years) 
because those chunks have variable length and wouldn't give an accurate count of the time 
difference calculated.  
3.6.3 Discussion 
There are a few strange things going on here that you should be aware of. First of all, 1962 
and 1965 precede the beginning of the epoch. Fortunately, 
mktime( )
fails gracefully here 
and produces negative epoch timestamps for each. This is okay because the absolute time 
value of either of these questionable timestamps isn't necessary, just the difference between 
the two. As long as epoch timestamps for the dates fall within the range of a signed integer, 
their difference is calculated correctly.  
Next, a wall clock (or calendar) reflects a slightly different amount of time change between 
these two dates, because they are on different sides of a DST switch. The result subtracting 
epoch timestamps gives is the correct amount of elapsed time, but the perceived human time 
change is an hour off. For example, on the Sunday morning in April when DST is activated, 
what's the difference between 1:30 A.M. and 4:30 A.M.? It seems like three hours, but the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested