Tip 
In this book, when we give instructions to implement a command we tell you 
on what tab and in which group the command button appears. When directing you 
to use multiple command buttons on the same tab, we might omit the tab name to 
avoid needless repetition.
6. 
In the Print group, click the Print button.
The Print dialog box opens. You can select the printer and set print options (such 
as the range of pages, specific records, or number of copies to be printed) from 
this dialog box.
Tip 
If you just want to send this datasheet to your default printer, click the Microsoft 
Office Button, point to Print, and then click Quick Print.
7. 
Close the Print dialog box and then in the Close Preview group, click the Close 
Print Preview button.
8. 
In the Navigation Pane, under Forms, double-click Employees.
The Employees form opens in Form view.
The information for each employee appears on its own page. Notice that there 
are two tabs at the top of the page, one for company information and one for 
personal information.
9. 
Click the Personal Info tab to see the information that is listed there, and then 
return to the Company Info tab.
 
Previewing and Printing Access Objects   
33
Pdf fillable form creator - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
adding signature to pdf form; create a pdf form from excel
Pdf fillable form creator - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
add form fields to pdf online; change font size in fillable pdf form
34 
 Chapter 1  Exploring Access 2007
10. 
Click the Microsoft Offi ce Button, point to Print, and then click Print Preview to 
preview the printout.
Notice that the preview shows information from only the active form tab. If you 
want to print information that appears on a different tab, you fi rst need to select 
that tab.
11. 
On the View toolbar, click the  Form View button to return to that view.
See Also You use essentially the same methods to print information displayed in different 
Access objects. For more information, see “Previewing and Printing a Report” in Chapter 8, 
“Working with Reports.”
CLOSE 
the Employees table and the Employees form without saving your changes, and 
then close the Print database.
Form View
Form View
the Employees table and the Employees form without saving your changes, and 
then close the 
Print
database.
database.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
pdf form creator; best way to make pdf forms
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
chrome save pdf with fields; acrobat create pdf form
Key Points
 l 
Access is part of the Microsoft Office system, so the basic interface objects—
menus, toolbars, dialog boxes—work much the same as other Office products  
or other Windows applications.
 l 
A database is the computer equivalent of an organized list of information. The 
power of a database is in your ability to organize and quickly retrieve precise  
information from it, and then to manipulate, share, and distribute or use this infor-
mation in various ways. In Access, data is organized in tables comprised of columns 
and rows, called fields and records. Access is a relational database, so you can treat 
the multiple tables in one database as a single storage area and easily pull informa-
tion from different tables in whatever order and format that suits you.
 l 
The types of objects you can work with in Access include tables, queries, forms, 
reports, macros, and modules. Tables are the core database objects and the pur-
pose of every other database object is to interact with one or more tables.
 l 
Every Access object has two or more views. For example, you view data in a table 
in Datasheet view and define how the data is displayed in Design view.
 l 
One way to locate information in an Access database is to create and run a query. 
You use queries to find information so that you can view, change, or analyze it in 
various ways. You can view queries in Datasheet view or Design view. You can use 
the results of a query as the basis for other Access objects, such as a form or report.
 l 
Forms make it easy for users to enter, retrieve, display and print information stored 
in tables. A form is essentially a window in which you can place controls that either 
give users information or accept information they enter. Forms can be viewed in 
Form view, Datasheet view, or Design view.
 l 
Reports display information from your tables in a nicely formatted, easily accessible 
way, either on your computer screen or on paper. A report can include items of infor- 
mation from multiple tables and queries, values calculated from information in the 
database, and formatting elements such as headers, footers, titles, and headings. 
Reports can be viewed in Design view, Print Preview, and Layout Preview.
 l 
Macros and modules substantially extend the capabilities of Access. Macros 
can be used to make routine database actions available as command buttons 
in forms, which help less experienced users work in your database. Modules are 
VBA programs. Whereas macros can automate many actions, VBA can be used to 
carry out tasks that are too complex to be handled with macros.
 
Key Points   
35
Chapter at a Glance
Chapter at a Glance
Prevent changes to 
database code, 
page 277
Assign a password to a database, page 274
 
  
273
10
 Securing and 
 
 Sharing Information
In this chapter, you will learn to:
 ✔ Assign a password to a database.
 ✔ Prevent changes to database code.
 ✔ Secure a database for distribution.
The  need for database security is an unfortunate fact of life. As with your house, car, 
offi ce, or briefcase, the level of security required for your database depends on the 
value of what you have and whether you are trying to protect it from curious eyes, 
accidental damage, malicious destruction, or theft.
The security of a company’s business information can be critical to its survival. For 
example, you might not be too concerned if a person gained unauthorized access 
to your products list, but you would be very concerned if a competitor managed to 
see—or worse, steal—your customer list. And it would be a disaster if someone de-
stroyed your critical order information.
Your goal as a database developer is to provide adequate protection without imposing 
unnecessary restrictions on the people who should have access to your database.  The 
type of security required to protect a database depends to a large extent on how many 
people are using it and where it is stored. If your database will never be opened by more 
than one person at a time, you don’t have to worry about the potential for corruption 
caused by several people trying to update the same information at the same time. If your 
database is sold outside of your organization as part of an application, you will want to 
take steps to prevent it from being misused in any way.
Tip 
In previous versions of Access you could set up workgroups and assign permissions 
to restrict the information available to members of each group and the actions they can 
perform. Access 2007 doesn’t offer this feature.
274 
 Chapter 10  Securing and Sharing Information
Another way to protect a database is by securing the distribution channel; for example, 
by making it available from a password-protected Web site.
In this chapter, you will explore ways to protect data from accidental or intentional 
corruption, and ways to make it diffi cult for unauthorized people to gain access to 
private information. Then you will learn about ways of sharing databases among 
team members and backing up a shared database.
See Also Do you need only a quick refresher on the topics in this chapter? See the Quick 
Reference section at the beginning of this book.
Important 
Before you can use the practice fi les in this chapter, you need to install them 
from the book’s companion CD to their default location. See “Using the Companion CD” at 
the beginning of this book for more information.
Troubleshooting 
Graphics and operating system–related instructions in this book 
refl ect the Windows Vista user interface. If your computer is running Windows XP 
and you experience trouble following the instructions as written, please refer to the 
“Information for Readers Running Windows XP” section at the beginning of this book.
Assigning a Password to a Database
You  can prevent unauthorized users from opening a database by assigning it a password. 
Access will prompt anyone attempting to open the database to enter the password. The 
database will open only if the correct password is entered.
Creating a Secure Password
You    can use any word or phrase as a password, but to create a secure password
keep the following in mind:
 
Passwords are case-sensitive. 
 
You can include letters, accented characters, numbers, spaces, and most 
punctuation. 
A good password includes uppercase letters, lowercase letters, and symbols or 
numbers, and isn’t a word found in a dictionary. For more information about 
strong passwords, visit 
www.microsoft.com/athome/security/privacy/password.mspx
Troubleshooting 
Graphics and operating system–related instructions in this book 
Graphics and operating system–related instructions in this book 
refl ect the Windows Vista user interface. If your computer is running Windows XP 
refl ect the Windows Vista user interface. If your computer is running Windows XP 
and you experience trouble following the instructions as written, please refer to the 
and you experience trouble following the instructions as written, please refer to the 
“Information for Readers Running Windows XP” section at the beginning of this book.
“Information for Readers Running Windows XP” section at the beginning of this book.
Creating a Secure Password
You
can use any word or phrase as a password, but to create a 
can use any word or phrase as a password, but to create a 
secure password
keep the following in mind:
keep the following in mind:
You can include letters, accented characters, numbers, spaces, and most 
You can include letters, accented characters, numbers, spaces, and most 
punctuation. 
punctuation. 
A good password includes uppercase letters, lowercase letters, and symbols or 
A good password includes uppercase letters, lowercase letters, and symbols or 
numbers, and isn’t a word found in a dictionary. For more information about 
numbers, and isn’t a word found in a dictionary. For more information about 
strong passwords, visit 
strong passwords, visit 
www.microsoft.com/athome/security/privacy/password.mspx
www.microsoft.com/athome/security/privacy/password.mspx
    secondary benefi t of assigning a password is that your database will automatically 
be encrypted each time you close it, and decrypted when you open it and provide the 
correct password. 
Tip 
In previous versions of Access, encrypting and decrypting a database was a separate 
function from assigning a password to it. If you open a database created in Access 2002 
or Access 2003 from Access 2007, you will still have the option of encoding or decoding it, 
which is what the process was called in those versions.
It  is easy to assign a database password, and certainly better than providing no protection 
at all, in that it keeps most honest people out of the database. However, many inexpensive 
password recovery utilities are available, theoretically to help people recover a lost pass-
word. Anyone can buy one of these utilities and “recover” the password to your database. 
Also, because the same password works for all users (and nothing prevents one person 
from giving the password to many other people), simple password protection is most 
appropriate for a single-user database.
To   assign a password to or remove a password from a database, you must fi rst open the 
database for exclusive use, meaning that no one else can have the database open. This 
will not be a problem for the database used in the following exercise, but if you want to 
set or remove a password for a real database that is located on a network share, you will 
need to make sure nobody else is using it.
Database Encrypting
  database created in Microsoft Offi ce Access 2007 is a  binary fi le; if you open it in 
a word processor or a text editor, its content is mostly unreadable. However, if you 
look closely enough at the fi le, you can discover quite a bit of information. It is un-
likely that enough information will be exposed to allow someone to steal anything 
valuable. But if you are concerned that someone might scan your database fi le with a 
utility that looks for key words that will lead them to restricted information, you can 
encrypt the fi le to make it really unreadable.
In previous versions of Access, the process of encoding (encrypting) a database and 
assigning a password were separate. In Access 2007, they have been combined as 
one command.
Encrypting a fi le prevents people who don’t have a copy of Access from being able 
to read and perhaps make sense of the data in your fi le. 
Database Encrypting
binary fi le
;;
if you open it in 
if you open it in 
a word processor or a text editor, its content is mostly unreadable. However, if you 
a word processor or a text editor, its content is mostly unreadable. However, if you 
look closely enough at the fi le, you can discover quite a bit of information. It is un-
look closely enough at the fi le, you can discover quite a bit of information. It is un-
likely that enough information will be exposed to allow someone to steal anything 
likely that enough information will be exposed to allow someone to steal anything 
valuable. But if you are concerned that someone might scan your database fi le with a 
valuable. But if you are concerned that someone might scan your database fi le with a 
utility that looks for key words that will lead them to restricted information, you can 
utility that looks for key words that will lead them to restricted information, you can 
encrypt
the fi le to make it really unreadable.
the fi le to make it really unreadable.
t the fi le to make it really unreadable.
t
t
In previous versions of Access, the process of encoding (encrypting) a database and 
In previous versions of Access, the process of encoding (encrypting) a database and 
assigning a password were separate. In Access 2007, they have been combined as 
assigning a password were separate. In Access 2007, they have been combined as 
one command.
one command.
Encrypting a fi le prevents people who don’t have a copy of Access from being able 
Encrypting a fi le prevents people who don’t have a copy of Access from being able 
to read and perhaps make sense of the data in your fi le. 
to read and perhaps make sense of the data in your fi le. 
276 
 Chapter 10  Securing and Sharing Information
In this exercise, you will assign a password to a database.
USE 
the Password database. This practice fi le is located in the Documents\Microsoft Press\
Access2007SBS\Securing folder.
BE SURE TO 
start Access before beginning this exercise, but don’t open the Password 
database yet.
1. 
Click  the Microsoft Offi ce Button, and then on the menu, click Open.
2. 
In   the Open dialog box, navigate to the Documents\Microsoft Press\Access2007SBS\
Reports folder, and click (don’t double-click) the Password database. Then click the 
Open arrow, and in the list, click Open Exclusive.
Access opens the database for your exclusive use—no one else can open the 
database until you close it.
3. 
On the Database Tools tab, in the Database Tools group, click the  Encrypt with 
Password button.
The Set Database Password dialog box   opens.
Tip 
Access 2007 includes many database-management tools. Familiarize yourself 
with the commands available from the Database Tools tab.  From this tab you can, for 
example, display an object’s dependencies, document the entire database, and update 
the linked tables.
4. 
In the Password box, type 2007!SbS, and then press the 
D
key.
Access disguises the characters of the password as asterisks as you type them, to 
protect against other people seeing your password.
database. This practice fi le is located in the 
database. This practice fi le is located in the 
Documents\Microsoft Press\
Documents\Microsoft Press\
Access2007SBS\Securing
Access2007SBS\Securing
folder.
folder.
BE SURE TO 
start Access before beginning this exercise, but don’t open the 
start Access before beginning this exercise, but don’t open the 
Password
Password
database yet.
database yet.
Microsoft Offi ce 
Button
Microsoft Offi ce 
Button
5. 
In the Verify box, type 2007!SbS. Then click OK.
6. 
Close and reopen the database.
The Password Required dialog box   opens.
7. 
In the Enter database password box, type 2007_SBS, and then click OK.
Access warns you that the password is not valid.
8. 
In the Microsoft Offi ce Access message box warning you that the password you 
entered is not valid, click OK. 
9. 
In the Password Required dialog box, type the correct password (2007!SbS), and 
then click OK.
The database opens.
CLOSE 
the Password database.
Tip 
To  remove a password from a database, open the database exclusively, entering 
the password when prompted to do so. On the Database Tools tab, in the Database Tools 
group, click the Decrypt Database button . Enter the password, and then click OK. Access 
removes the password, allowing anyone to open the database.
Preventing Changes to Database Code
If     you have added Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) procedures to a database, 
you certainly don’t want users who aren’t qualifi ed or authorized to make changes to your 
code. You can prevent unauthorized access in two ways: by protecting your VBA code with 
a password, or by saving the database as a Microsoft Database Executable (ACCDE) fi le  . If 
you set a password for the code, it remains available for editing by anyone who knows the 
password. If you save the database as an ACCDE fi le, people using the database application 
can run your code, but they can’t view or edit it.
See Also For information about saving a database as an executable fi le, see “Securing a 
Database for Distribution” later in this chapter.
CLOSE
 
Preventing Changes to Database Code   
277
278 
 Chapter 10  Securing and Sharing Information
In this exercise, you will secure the VBA code in a database by assigning a password to it.
USE 
the Prevent database. This practice fi le is located in the Documents\Microsoft Press\
Access2007SBS\Securing folder.
BE SURE TO 
start Access before beginning this exercise.
OPEN 
the Prevent database.
1. 
On the Database Tools tab, in the Macro group, click the Visual Basic button.
The Visual Basic Editor   starts.
2. 
On the Tools menu, click base Properties.
The Project Properties dialog box   opens.
3. 
On the Protection tab, select the Lock project for viewing check box.
4. 
In the Password box, type 2007!VbA, and then press the 
D
key.
USE 
the 
Prevent
Prevent
database. This practice fi le is located in the 
database. This practice fi le is located in the 
t
t database. This practice fi le is located in the 
t
t
Documents\Microsoft Press\
Documents\Microsoft Press\
Access2007SBS\Securing
Access2007SBS\Securing
start Access before beginning this exercise.
start Access before beginning this exercise.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested