c# itextsharp convert pdf to image : Break a pdf password Library control component asp.net web page wpf mvc FBeginner1-part1233

TimeValue Function...................................................................................................190
Year Function............................................................................................................190
Weekday Function.....................................................................................................190
WeekDayName Function...........................................................................................191
A L
OOK
A
HEAD
..................................................................................................................191
14 The Format Function.............................................................................192
S
TRING
F
ORMAT
C
HARACTERS
..................................................................................................192
N
UMERIC
F
ORMAT
C
HARACTERS
................................................................................................192
D
ATE
F
ORMAT
C
HARACTERS
.....................................................................................................194
T
IME
F
ORMAT
C
HARACTERS
.....................................................................................................196
A L
OOK
A
HEAD
..................................................................................................................197
15 Console Programming...........................................................................199
T
HE
C
ONSOLE
S
CREEN
..........................................................................................................199
T
HE
C
ONSOLE
F
UNCTIONS
.......................................................................................................199
C
ONSOLE
C
OLORS
................................................................................................................201
P
OSITIONING
T
EXT
................................................................................................................203
P
RINTING
T
EXT
...................................................................................................................204
D
ETERMINING
AND
S
ETTING
THE
S
IZE
OF
THE
C
ONSOLE
.....................................................................204
G
ETTING
U
SER
I
NPUT
............................................................................................................206
I
NKEY
..............................................................................................................................207
G
ETKEY
............................................................................................................................209
I
NPUT
..............................................................................................................................209
L
INE
I
NPUT
........................................................................................................................210
U
SING
THE
M
OUSE
...............................................................................................................210
C
REATING
A
T
EXT
V
IEW
P
ORT
..................................................................................................212
A L
OOK
A
HEAD
..................................................................................................................216
16Control Structures..................................................................................217
A P
ROGRAM
IS
A
S
TATE
M
ACHINE
..............................................................................................217
T
HE
I
F
S
TATEMENT
B
LOCK
......................................................................................................218
Using Bitwise Operators in an If Statement..............................................................219
The Not Problem.......................................................................................................219
The Single-Line If Statement.....................................................................................219
The If Code Block......................................................................................................220
Nested If Statements................................................................................................220
The Else Statement...................................................................................................221
The ElseIf Statement.................................................................................................221
T
HE
IIF F
UNCTION
..............................................................................................................223
11
Break a pdf password - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
password protected pdf; password on pdf file
Break a pdf password - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf password remover online; copy text from protected pdf
T
HE
S
ELECT
C
ASE
S
TATEMENT
B
LOCK
.........................................................................................226
17 Appendix A: GNU Free Documentation License........................................229
18 Appendix B: Setting Up FreeBasic Under Microsoft Windows...................236
I
NSTALLING
FBI
DE
................................................................................................................238
S
ETTING
U
P
FBI
DE
..............................................................................................................238
C
OMPILING
Y
OUR
F
IRST
P
ROGRAM
.............................................................................................239
A
DDITIONAL
R
ESOURCES
.........................................................................................................240
I
NTRODUCTION
TO
FBI
DE
........................................................................................................241
G
ENERAL
S
ETTINGS
..............................................................................................................241
M
OST
R
ECENT
U
SED
F
ILES
L
IST
...............................................................................................243
S
YNTAX
H
IGHLIGHTING
...........................................................................................................243
T
HEMES
............................................................................................................................244
K
EYWORDS
........................................................................................................................245
T
ABBED
I
NTERFACE
...............................................................................................................246
L
INE
N
UMBERS
...................................................................................................................246
R
ESULTS
W
INDOW
...............................................................................................................247
S
UBROUTINE
AND
F
UNCTION
F
OLDING
..........................................................................................247
S
AVE
F
ILE
I
NDICATOR
............................................................................................................248
Q
UIT
T
AB
S
ELECT
AND
C
LOSE
T
AB
............................................................................................248
E
DITING
AND
F
ORMAT
F
UNCTIONS
..............................................................................................248
B
LOCK
C
OMMENT
-U
NCOMMENT
.................................................................................................249
B
RACKET
M
ATCHING
..............................................................................................................250
S
UBROUTINE
AND
F
UNCTION
B
ROWSER
........................................................................................251
R
UNNING
P
ROGRAMS
AND
C
REATING
E
XECUTABLES
...........................................................................251
A
DDING
AN
I
CON
TO
Y
OUR
P
ROGRAM
..........................................................................................252
F
REE
B
ASIC
H
ELP
F
ILE
...........................................................................................................253
19 Appendix D: Installing FreeBASIC under Linux........................................254
12
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf password; convert password protected pdf to excel
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
reader save pdf with password; break password pdf
If we look at the fact, we shall find that the great inventions of the age are not, with us at 
least, always produced in universities. 
Charles Babbage 
13
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
password pdf; a pdf password online
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages. Divide PDF
pdf password unlock; advanced pdf password remover
1
A Brief Introduction to FreeBASIC
FreeBASIC is a 32-bit BASIC compiler that outputs native code for Microsoft 
Windows, Linux and DOS via DJGPP.  FreeBASIC is also Open Source, which means any 
one may freely view and edit the source to suit their needs.  Quickbasic Compatibility is 
FreeBASIC's call to fame, for it is the most compatible compiler available.
Differences from QuickBASIC
Default (DEF###) type of not explicitly declared variables
FreeBASIC: INTEGER
QuickBASIC: Single
INTEGER's size
FreeBASIC: 32-bit, use SHORT type for 16-bit integers
QuickBASIC: 16-bit
Function calling
FreeBASIC: All functions must have been declared, even with CALL.
QuickBASIC: With CALL it is possible to invoke prototype-less functions.
Arrays not declared
FreeBASIC: All functions must be explicitly declared.
QuickBASIC: Arrays are automagically created with up to 10 indexes.
Variables with the same names as keywords
FreeBASIC: Not allowed, even with suffixes.
QuickBASIC: Allowed if no suffix is used (ie, dim LEFT as integer).
Alignment / Padding of TYPE fields
FreeBASIC: Same as in C, use FIELD=constant to change.
QuickBASIC: Never done.
Fixed-Length strings
FreeBASIC: Real length is the given len plus one (null char), even on TYPE 
fields. Strings are filled with nulls, so strings can't contain null characters.
QuickBASIC: Strings are filled with whitespaces.
14
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms. Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application.
change password on pdf document; create password protected pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
copy from protected pdf; password on pdf file
Key Features of FreeBASIC
Built-in Graphics library
Completely compatible with old QB Graphics commands, but it builds on this 
to offer much more.
Support for high resolutions and any color depth, and any number of 
offscreen pages.
All drawing functions can operate on screen as well as on offscreen surfaces 
(GET/PUT buffers) of any size.
Advanced sprites handling, with clipping, transparency, alpha and custom 
blending.
Direct access to screen memory.
BMP loading/saving capabilities.
OpenGL support: init an OpenGL mode with a single command, then use GL 
instructions directly.
Keyboard, mouse and joystick handling functions.
The Graphics library is fast: MMX optimized routines are used if MMX is 
available.
Small footprint: when using Graphics commands, your EXEs will grow in size 
by a minimum of 30/40K only.
Stand-aloness: generated EXEs will depend only upon system libs, no 
external libraries required.
As all of FB, also gfxlib is completely multiplatform: underneath it uses 
DirectX or GDI (if DX is not available) under Win32, direct VGA/ModeX/VESA 
access under DOS, or raw Xlib under Linux.
Create OBJ's, LIB's, DLL's, and console or GUI EXE's
You are in no way locked to an IDE or editor of any kind.
You can create static and dynamic libraries adding just one command-line 
option (-lib or -dll).
Debugging support
Full debugging support with GDB (the GNU debugger) or Insight (the GDB 
GUI frontend)
Array bounds checking (only enabled by the -exx command-line option)
Null pointers checking (same as above)
Function overloading
DECLARE SUB Test OVERLOAD (a AS DOUBLE)
DECLARE SUB Test (a AS SINGLE)
DECLARE SUB Test (a AS INTEGER, b AS INTEGER = 1234)
DECLARE SUB Test (a AS BYTE, b AS SHORT)
15
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
convert password protected pdf to excel online; create password protected pdf
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
change password on pdf; create password protected pdf reader
Inline Assembly
Intel syntax.
Reference variables directly by name with no "trick code" needed.
Most of the known C libraries can be used directly, without wrappers
GTK+ 2.0: cross-platform GUI Toolkit (over 1MB of headers, including 
support for Glade, libart and glGtk)
libxml and libxslt: defacto standard XML and XSL libraries
GSL - GNU Scientific library: complex numbers, vectors and matrices, FFT 
linear algebra, statistics, sorting, differential equations, and a dozen other 
sub-libraries with mathematical routines
GMP - GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library: known as the fastest 
bignum library
SDL - Simple DirectMedia Layer: multimedia library for audio, user input, 3D 
and 2D gfx (including the sub-libraries such as SDL_Net, SDL_TTF, etc)
OpenGL: portable library for developing interactive 2D and 3D graphics 
games and applications (including support for frameworks such as GLUT and 
GLFW)
Allegro: game programming library (graphics, sounds, player input, etc)
GD, DevIL, FreeImage, GRX and other graphic-related libraries
OpenAL, Fmod, BASS: 2D and 3D sound systems, including support for mod, 
mp3, ogg, etc
ODE and Newton - dynamics engines: libraries for simulating rigid body 
dynamics
cgi-util and FastCGI: web development
DirectX and the Windows API - the most complete headers set between the 
BASIC compilers available, including support for the Unicode functions
DispHelper - COM IDispatch interfaces made easy
And many more!
Support for numeric (integer or floating-point) and strings types
DECLARE SUB Test(a AS DOUBLE = 12.345, BYVAL b AS BYTE = 255, BYVAL s 
AS STRING = "abc")
Unicode support
Besides ASCII files with Unicode escape sequences (\u), FreeBASIC can parse 
UTF-8, UTF-16LE, UTF-16BE, UTF-32LE and UTF-32BE source (.bas) or header 
(.bi) files, they can freely mixed with other sources/headers in the same 
project (also with other ASCII files).
Literal strings can be typed in the original non-latin alphabet, just use an 
text-editor that supports some of the Unicode formats listed above.
The WSTRING type holds wide-characters, all string functions (like LEFT, 
TRIM, etc) will work with wide-strings too.
16
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
pdf password; pdf password remover online
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
convert protected pdf to word; pdf password reset
Unlimited number of symbols
Being a 32-bit application, FreeBASIC can compile source code files up to 2 
GB long.
The number of symbols (variables, constants, et cetera) is only limited by 
the total memory available during compile time. You can, for example, 
include OpenGL, SDL, BASS, and GTK simultaneously in your source code.
17
2
Numeric Data Types
When starting out with a new programming language, one of the first things you 
should learn is the language’s data types. Virtually every program manipulates data, and 
to correctly manipulate that data you must thoroughly understand the available data 
types. Data type errors rank second to syntax errors but they are a lot more troublesome. 
The compiler can catch syntax errors and some data type errors, but most data type 
errors occur when the program is running, and often only when using certain types of 
data. These kind of intermittent errors are difficult to find and difficult to fix. Knowing the 
kind, size and limits of the data types will help keep these kinds of errors to a minimum.
FreeBasic has all the standard numeric data types that you would expect for a 
Basic compiler, as well as pointers which you usually only find in lower-level languages 
such as C. Table 3.1 lists all the numeric data types that FreeBasic supports. In the list 
below, you will notice that Integer and Long are grouped together. This is because a Long 
is just an alias for Integer. They are exactly the same data type.
Numeric Data Types
Size
Limits
Byte
8-bit signed, 1 byte
-128 to 127
Double
64-bit, floating point, 8 
bytes
-2.2E-308 to +1.7E+308
Integer (Long)
32-bit, signed, 4 bytes
-2,147,483,648 to 
2,147,483,647
LongInt
64-bit, signed, 8 bytes
-9,223,372,036,854 775 808 
to 9,223 
372,036,854,775,807
Short
16-bit, signed, 2 bytes
-32,768 to 32,767
Single
32-bit, floating point, 4 
bytes
1.1 E-38 to 3.43 E+38
UByte
8-bit, unsigned, 1 byte
0 to 255
UInteger
32-bit, unsigned , 4 bytes
0 to 4,294,967,295
ULongInt
64-bit, unsigned, 8 bytes
0 to 
18,446,744,073,709,551,61
5
Ushort
16-bit, unsigned, 2 bytes
0 to 65365
Pointer
32-bit, memory address, 4 
bytes
Must be initialized at 
runtime
Table 2.1: FreeBasic Numeric Data Types
Signed Versus Unsigned Data Types
Signed data types, as the name implies, can be negative, zero or positive. 
Unsigned types can only be zero or positive, which give them a greater positive range 
18
than their signed counterparts. If your data will never be negative, using the unsigned 
data types will allow you to store larger numbers in the same size variable.
The Floating Point Data Type
The floating point data types, Single and Double are able to store numbers with 
decimal digits. Keep in mind that floating-point numbers are subject to rounding errors, 
which can accumulate over long calculations. You should carry more than the number of 
decimal digits than you need to ensure the greatest accuracy.
Pointer Data Types
Pointer data types are unlike the other data types in that they store a memory 
address and not data. Since pointers are handled differently than regular data types, a 
separate chapter has been devoted to the subject and will not be examined in this 
chapter.
Numeric Variables
The numeric data types define what numbers you can work with in your program, 
but you must create variables to actually hold the numbers. A variable is a name 
composed of letters, numbers or the underscore character such as MyInteger, or 
MyInteger2. There are rules for variable naming though, that you must keep in mind. 
Variable names must start with a letter or the underscore character. It is not 
recommended however, to use the underscore character, as this is generally used 
to indicate a system variable, and it is best to avoid it in case there may be 
conflicts with existing system variable names.
Most punctuation marks have a special meaning in FreeBasic and cannot be used 
in a variable name. While the period can be used, it is also used as a deference 
operator in Types, and so should not be used to avoid confusion or potential 
problems with future versions of the compiler.
Numbers can be used in a variable name, but cannot be the first character. MyVar1 
is legal, but 1MyVar will generate a compiler error.
The compiler creates variables in two ways. The first method, which isn’t 
recommended and has been moved to the QB compatibility mode, is to let the compiler 
create variables on their first use. When the compiler first encounters a name in a 
program that is not a reserved word or keyword, it creates a variable using that name 
with the default data type. In most cases, the default data type is an integer. You can 
change the default variable type by using the DEF### directive, which will be covered 
later in this chapter. To enable these features, you must compile your program with either 
“-lang qb” or “-lang deprecated”. The problem with the first-use method is that it is very 
easy to introduce hard-to-find bugs in your program.
19
The term “bug” for a software error has a long, and somewhat disputed history. The 
term predates modern computers and was used to describe industrial or electrical 
defects. Its use in relation to software errors is credited to Grace Hopper, a pioneer in 
the field of software design. According to the story, a moth was discovered between two 
electrical relays in a Mark II computer. Hopper made a note of it in her journal, along 
with the moth, and the term became associated with software errors after the incident. 
The moth is now on display at the Smithsonian.
1
The Dim Statement
The second, and preferred method is to explicitly declare variables in your program 
using the Dim statement. The Dim statement instructs the compiler to set aside some 
memory for a variable of a particular data type.  For example, the statement Dim 
myInteger as Integer instructs the compiler to set aside 4 byes of storage for the 
variable myInteger. Whenever you manipulate myInteger in a program, the compiler will 
manipulate the data at the memory location set aside for myInteger. Just as with variable 
names, there are some rules for the use of Dim as well.
1. Dim myVar As Integer. This will create a single integer-type variable.
2. Dim As Integer myVar, myVar2. This will create two integer-type 
variables.
3. Dim myVar As Double, myVar2 As Integer. This will create a double-
type variable and an integer-type variable.
4. Dim myVar as Integer = 5. This will create an integer-type variable 
and set the value of the variable to 5.
5. Dim myVar As Double = 5.5, myVar2 As Integer = 5. This will 
create a double-type variable and set the value to 5.5, and an integer-
type variable and set the value to 5.
6. Dim Shared as Integer myInt. This will create a shared (global) 
variable myInt accessible anywhere within your program.
Caution Dim myVar, myVar2 As Double. This may look like it creates two 
double-type variables, however myVar will not be defined and will result in compilation 
errors. Use rule 2 if you want to create multiple variables of the same type.
Shared Variables
As you can see in rule 6 above, using the Dim Shared version of Dim creates a 
shared variable. This means that any variable you create as Shared can be accessed 
anywhere within the program’s current module. To put it another way, the scope of a 
shared variable is module level scope. Scope refers to the visibility of a variable, where 
you can access a particular variable within a program. There are different levels of scope 
and each are discussed in detail later in this book.
The number of variables in your program (as well as the program itself) is limited only 
by your available memory, up to 2 gigabytes. 
1
See WhatIs.com Definitions: http://whatis.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,290660,sid9_gci211714,00.html
20
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested