c# itextsharp pdf page to image : Password protected pdf application software utility azure windows winforms visual studio FBeginner2-part1244

Static Variables
Static variables are used within subroutines and functions and retain their values 
between calls to the subroutine or functions. The following program demonstrates using a 
static variable as a counter within a subroutine.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
SubStaticSub()
'Dimensionastaticvariable
StaticcntAsInteger

'Incrementthecount
cnt+=1
Print"InStaticSub";cnt;"time(s)."
EndSub
'Dimensionworkingvariable
DimiAsInteger
'Callsub10times
Fori=1To10
StaticSub
Next
Sleep
End
Listing 2.1: static.bas
Analysis:
In line 1 the subroutine StaticSub is defined. A subroutine is code that is 
executed only when called by the subroutine name which, in this case, is StaticSub. Line 
3 dimensions a static variable cnt, which is incremented when the subroutine is called in 
line 6. Line 7 prints out the current value of cnt to the console screen.
In line 10 a working varible that will be used in the For-Next is declared. Lines 14 
through 16 define the For-Next loop which will call StaticSub 10 times. Line 18 waits for a 
key press and line 19 ends the program.
Running the program in FBIde, you should get the following output.
InStaticSub1time(s).
InStaticSub2time(s).
InStaticSub3time(s).
InStaticSub4time(s).
21
Password protected pdf - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online; password pdf
Password protected pdf - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
add password to pdf document; change password on pdf document
InStaticSub5time(s).
InStaticSub6time(s).
InStaticSub7time(s).
InStaticSub8time(s).
InStaticSub9time(s).
InStaticSub10time(s).
Output 2.1: Output of static.bas
As you can see from the output, the value of cnt is preserved between calls to the 
subroutine. Static variables can only be defined within a subroutine or function. Variables 
declared outside of a subroutine or function, that is at the module level, will maintain 
their values and are static by default.
Common Variables
Variables declared as Common can be shared between multiple code modules, that 
is between multiple bas files in the same program. Common variables will be discussed in 
detail later in this book.
Extern and Import Variables
Extern and Import are used when creating DLL's and like Common, are designed to 
share variables in different modules.  Extern and Import will be discussed in detail in the 
chapter on creating DLLs with FreeBasic.
Data Type Suffixes
You can use QuickBasic style data type suffixes in FreeBasic, although this feature 
was implemented mainly to support QuickBasic legacy code and is only available when 
compiling with the “-lang qb” or “-lang deprecated” compiler options. Table 3.2 lists the 
data type suffixes.
Data Type
Suffix
Byte
b
Short
s
Integer
%
Long
&, l
Ulong
ul
LongInt
ll
UlongInt
ull
Single
!
Double
#
String
$
Table 2.2: Supported Data Type Suffixes
22
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Online Remove Password from Protected PDF file. Download Free Trial. Remove password from protected PDF file. Find your password-protected PDF and upload it.
password on pdf; create password protected pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Change converted image size in Visual Basic program. Able to convert password protected PDF document. Source codes for quick integration in VB.NET class.
pdf password remover; convert protected pdf to word document
Changing The Default Data Type
As already mentioned, the default data type for an undeclared variable is an 
integer. The default data type can be changed for a range of variables by using one of 
the DEF statements. Table 3.3 lists all the DEF statements available in FreeBasic.
Statement
Comment
DEFBYTE a-b
Sets the default data type to byte for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFDBL a-b
Sets the default data type to double for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFINT a-b
Sets the default data type to integer for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFLNG a-b
Sets the default data type to long for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFLNGINT a-b
Sets the default data type to longint for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFSHORT a-b
Sets the default data type to short for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFSNG a-b
Sets the default data type to single for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFSTR a-b
Sets the default data type to string for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFUBYTE a-b
Sets the default data type to ubyte for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFUINT a-b
Sets the default data type to uinteger 
for undeclared variables starting with 
letter range.
DEFULNGINT a-b
Sets the default data type to ulongint for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
DEFUSHORT a-b
Sets the default data type to ushort for 
undeclared variables starting with letter 
range.
Table 2.3: FreeBasic DEF Statements
23
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support for customizing image size. Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. Open source codes can be added to C# class.
add password to pdf online; a pdf password online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
pdf security password; add password to pdf file without acrobat
The DEF statement will affect all variables that start with a letter in the given 
range. So if you add DEFDBL m-n to your program, any variable starting with m or n, will 
default to a double-type. All other variables that start with different numbers will default 
to an integer-type. A Dim statement will override any DEF statement, so if you declare an 
integer variable starting with m, it will be an integer, even though the DEFDBL is in 
effect.
Using Different Number Formats
Besides decimal numbers, FreeBasic is able to recognize numbers in hexadecimal, 
binary and octal formats. Table 3.4 lists the number base and format to use.
Number Base
Format
Decimal
myVar = 254
Hexadecimal
myVar = &HFE
Binary
myVar = &B11111110
Octal
myVar = &O376
Exponential Numbers
myVar = 243E10
Table 2.4: Format of Number Bases
Hexadecimal Numbers
Hexadecimal is a base 16 numbering scheme and have digits in the range of 0 to F. 
Hexadecimal numbers are commonly used as constant values in the Windows API and 
many third party libraries as it is a compact way to represent a large value. To indicate a 
hexadecimal number, use the &H prefix.
Binary Numbers
Binary is a base 2 numbering scheme and have digits in the range of 0 and 1. 
Binary is the language of the computer. Although we can enter numbers and letters into 
the computer, it all must be translated into binary before the computer can understand 
it. To indicate a binary number, use the &B prefix.
Octal Numbers
Octal is a base eight numbering scheme and have digits in the range of 0 to 7. 
Octal numbers were very popular in early computer systems, but aren’t used much today 
except in some specialized applications. To indicate an octal number, use the &O prefix.
Exponential Numbers
You can use exponential numbers in your program by adding the E suffix followed 
by the power. To use the number 10
5
, you would write the number as 10E05. You can 
directly set a double or single type variable using the exponent format. You can also use 
negative exponents such as 10E-5, which when printed to the screen would like 1.e­004.
24
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source code is available for copying and using in .NET Class.
copy protected pdf to word converter online; pdf password protect
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Can I use RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging & splitting toolkit SDK to split password-protected PDF document using Visual C# code?
add copy protection pdf; convert password protected pdf to excel
Which Data Type To Use?
There are a number of different data types available, so how do you choose the 
right data type for any given application? The rule of thumb is to use the largest data 
type you need to hold the expected range of values. This may seem like stating the 
obvious, but many programs fail because the programmer did not fully understand the 
range of data in their program. When you crate a program, you should map out not only 
the logic of the program, but the data associated with each block of logic. When you map 
out the data ahead of time, you are less likely to run into data-type errors.
For example, if you were working with ASCII codes, which range from 0 to 255, an 
ubyte would be a good choice since the range of an ubyte is the same as the range of 
ASCII codes, and you are only using 1 byte of memory. There is another consideration 
though, the “natural” data size of the computer. On a 32-bit system, the natural data size 
is 4 bytes, or an integer. This means that the computer is optimized to handle an integer, 
and does so more efficiently, even though you are “wasting” 3 bytes of memory by using 
an integer for an ASCII code.
In most cases an integer is a good general-purpose choice for integer data. The 
range is quite large, it handles both negative and positive numbers and you benefit from 
using the computer’s natural data type. For floating point data, a double is a good choice 
since, like the integer, it has a good range of values and better precision than a single. 
For large integer data you should use a uinteger for positive data or a longint for large 
negative and positive numbers. These are only suggestions; what data type you end up 
using will be dictated by the needs of your program.
These “rules of thumb” apply to single variable declarations where a few wasted bytes 
are not critical. However, as you will see in the chapter on arrays, choosing the right 
sized data type is critical in large arrays where a few wasted bytes can add up to a 
large amount of wasted memory.
Option Explicit
You may notice when looking at other people's source code, the compiler directive 
Option Explicit has been used at the top of each program. A compiler directive is code 
that instructs the compiler to do something. In the case of Option Explicit, it instructs the 
compiler to make sure that any variable being used has been properly Dim’ed. Although 
you can write a program without using Option Explicit and explicitly Dim’ing each 
variable, you run the risk of introducing nasty, hard-to-find bugs as the following short 
program illustrates.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
DimmyIntegerasInteger
'setmyIntegertoavalue
myInteger=5
'Oopswemispelledthevariablename
Print"TheoutputofmyIntegeris";myIntger
'waitforakeypress
Sleep
End
Listing 2.2: nooptionexplicit.bas
25
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
PDF Document Protect. PDF Password. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add password to PDF; Allow users to remove password from PDF;
create copy protected pdf; password pdf files
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored.
change password on pdf; create pdf password
Analysis:
In line 1 myInteger is being declared to the compiler. The compiler will 
use this declaration to allocate space for the variable. In line 3 the variable is being 
initialized to a value, in this case 3. The Print statement in line 5 will print out the result 
to the console screen. Sleep, listed in line 7, will wait for a keypress and the End keyword 
in line 8 will end the program. The End statement isn't mandatory at the end of a 
program but should be used especially if you want to return an exit code to the operating 
system.
After typing this program into FBIde and running the program, you should see the 
following output.
TheoutputofmyIntegeris0
Output 2.2: nooptionexplicit.bas
The output should be 5, but as you can see, the result isn’t what was expected or 
wanted. Since Option Explicit wasn’t used in the program, the compiler created a new 
variable when it encountered the misspelled variable name, myIntger, in the print 
statement. If this was large and complicated program, you can see how difficult it would 
be to track this error down and fix it.
Now, add Option Explicit at the top of the program and run it again. You should see 
the following error message in the results pane of FBIde.
Variablenotdeclared,found:'myIntger'
Print"TheoutputofmyIntegeris";myIntger
^
Output 2.3: Modified nooptionexplicit.bas
Here the compiler detected the misspelled variable name and informed us of the 
problem. You should always use Option Explicit in your programs. A few seconds of extra 
typing will save you hours of frustration.
A Note about Option Explicit 
Recent versions of the FreeBASIC compiler do not allow OPTION commands 
including OPTION EXPLICIT. From now on OPTION EXPLICIT is implied and your programs 
will behave as if you used OPTION EXPLICIT. It is a good rule of thumb to always implicitly 
declare your variables, so get in the habit now. To compile a source file that uses OPTION 
EXPLICIT, either use “-lang deprecated” or remove the OPTION EXPLICIT line from the 
source file.
A Look Ahead
When working with numeric data, there are times when it becomes necessary to 
convert one data type to another. FreeBasic offers two conversion methods, implicit and 
explicit, which you will see in the next chapter.
26
Excercises
1) What data type would be the best to store the number 196?
2) What data type would be the best to store the number 2.134?
3) What data type is the best for general usage on 32-bit systems?
4) What is the difference between signed and unsigned data types?
5) What prefix would you use to designate a binary number?
6) What prefix would you use to designate a hexidecimal number?
7) What Alphabetic letters are allowed in a hexidecimal number?
8) What would the hexidecimal number 1AF be in decimal form?
27
3
Converting Numeric Data Types
When you work with numbers there will come a time when you will need to convert 
a variable from one data type to another data type. In FreeBasic there are two types of 
data conversion. Implicit, where the compiler will automatically convert the data types 
during an assignment or calculation, and explicit using one of the predefined conversion 
functions.
Implicit Data Conversion
Implicit data conversion occurs either through an assignment statement, or as the 
result of a calculation. Where implicit data conversion can cause a problem is in the loss 
of precision that can result when converting a large data type to a smaller data type. 
While implicit data conversion eases the programming process somewhat, you want to 
make sure that the results you are getting are what you expect. You should always check 
the result of an implicit conversion to make sure the range of values being converted is in 
the expected range.
The following short program illustrates the conversion that takes place during an 
assignment statement.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
DimAsDoublemyDbl
DimAsIntegermyInt
'SetmyDbltoafloatvalue
myDbl=5.56
'AssignmyIntthefloat,willbeconvertedtoint
myInt=myDbl
Print"myInt=";myInt
Sleep
End
Listing 3.1: assignconv.bas
Analysis:
In lines 1 and 2 two variable are being declared, myDbl, a double-type 
varibale and myInt, an integer-type variable. Line 3 is a comment which, as you can see, 
starts with the ' (single quote) character. In line 4 the double-type variable is being 
initialized to the floating-point value 5.56. In line 6 the double is being assigned to an 
integer variable, invoking the implicit conversion. In line 7 the Print displays the result on 
the console window. In line 8 the program waits for a key press with the Sleep statement 
and in line 9 the End statement is used to end the program.
Running the program will result in the following output.
myInt=6
Output 3.1: assignconv.bas
28
In the program, the value of myDbl which is a double-type variable, was set to 
5.56. When myInt was assigned this float value, the compiler converted the value to an 
integer, and then rounded it up to 6. Maybe you were just looking for the whole number 
portion of 5? In this case, your result would be incorrect, although you may not know until 
later in the program. This type of subtle bug is another one of those problems that are 
hard to track down and fix.
Caution Even if the compiler is producing the correct result, there is no guarantee 
that future versions of the compiler will. It may be necessary to change the behavior of 
the compiler to add features or fix a bug, and you may find yourself with a program that 
suddenly quits working. 
The next little program illustrates the implicit conversion that takes place during a 
calculation. In this example, the two integer operands are converted to double-types 
during the division calculation.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
DimAsDoublemyDbl
DimAsIntegermyInt1,myInt2
'AssignvaluestomyInt1,myInt2
myInt1=5
myInt2=3
myDbl=myInt1/myInt2
Print"myDbl=";myDbl
Sleep
End
Listing 3.2: calcconv.bas
Analysis:
Line 1 and 2 in the program are the alternate Dim statement formats. You 
can use this format to declare multiple variables of the same type. In line 4 and 5, the 
variables are initialized. In line 6 the / character is the division operator. The result of the 
division operation will be implicitly converted to a double-type in the assignment 
statement. Line 7 prints the newly converted value to the screen and in lines 8 and 9, the 
program will wait for a key press and then end.
Running the program produces the following output.
myDbl=1.66666666666667
Output 3.2: calconv.bas
The result is as expected since the double-type has a greater precision than the 
integer-type. However, consider this program and its output, which demonstrates the 
implicit rounding during calculations.
29
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
DimAsDoublemyDbl1,myDbl2
DimAsIntegermyInt
'AssignvaluestomyInt1,myInt2
myDbl1=5.6
myDbl2=3.1
myInt=myDbl1/myDbl2
Print"myInt=";myInt
Sleep
End
Listing 3.3: calcconv2.bas
Analysis:
This program is similar to the program in Listing 4.2 except the 
conversion process is from two double-type variables to an integer. Lines 1 and 2 declare 
the working variables. Lines 4 and 5 set the values of the two double-type variables. In 
line 6 the double-type division result is implicitly converted to an integer, resulting in 
precision loss. Line 7 prints the result to the console window and lines 8 and 9 wait for a 
key press and end the program.
The output of the program:
myInt=2
Output 3.3: calconv2.bas
In this example, the two double-type variables were converted to integers and 
then the division operation was performed. Since 5.6 was rounded up to 6 during the 
conversion, the result is 2 rather than 1. This may not be a problem, but you should be 
aware that these types of conversions occur when working with mixed precision types.
Explicit Data Conversion
There is an alternative to implicit data conversion, explicit data conversion where 
you use one of FreeBasic’s built-in conversion functions. Since these functions are 
designed for conversion, they return consistent results and are unlikely to change even if 
the implicit rules of the compiler change. Even though it is more work, it is always safer 
to explicitly convert data to the needed data type before carrying out operations on that 
data.
Numeric Data Conversion Functions
Table 4.1 lists all the conversion functions. Keep in mind that these functions do 
not check for overflow, so be sure that the value passed to these functions is in the 
expected range.
30
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested