c# itextsharp pdf page to image : Break pdf password application Library cloud windows asp.net azure class FBeginner4-part1251

a function, be sure not to change anything in the file. You should always open the files in 
read-only mode if your editor provides that functionality.
The Declaration Statement
If you look at math.bi you will see a number of Declaration statements. A 
declaration statement is a function prototype that tells the compiler that there is a 
function definition somewhere in the program code, or in a library or an external dll. This 
forward reference is used so that the compiler won’t complain if the function or sub is 
called before it finds the actual code for the function.  Once you understand how to 
interpret a declaration statement, you will be able to use any function in the runtime 
library.
To understand the components of a declaration statement, here is the declaration 
statement for the ceil function in math.bi. The ceil function rounds a decimal value up to 
the nearest integer. That is, 1.5 would become 2.
DeclarefunctionceilcdeclAlias"ceil"(byvalasdouble)asdouble
You can break this declare down into the following functional sections.
Declare: This is the keyword for a declare statement.
Function: This can either be Function, to indicate that this procedure returns a 
value, or Sub, which indicates that the procedure does not return a value.
Ceil: This is the name of the function and the name that you would use in your 
code. Do not use the name after Alias.
Cdecl: This is the function's method of passing arguments. When calling an 
external function, parameters must be pushed on the stack in the correct order so 
that the function can pop the parameters off the stack correctly. Cdecl stands for C 
Declare, and passes the arguments from right to left using the C convention of 
parameter passing. The Pascal calling convention pushes arguments from left to 
right and is used when calling functions created in the Pascal language. The 
Stdcall calling convention pushes arguments from right to left and is used in Basic 
libraries and Windows API.
Alias: This is an alternate name that is used by the linker when your code is linked 
to other languages. You use an alias in case there is a function in the target 
language that has the same name as your function.
( ): The values inside the parenthesis are the parameters that the function or sub 
expects. Ceil expects one parameter, a double-type value. If the function expects 
multiple parameters, then commas will separate them. A parameter can be any of 
the FreeBasic data types or a composite type. Many of the runtime functions 
require pointers to other data types or data structures. 
ByVal: The byval (by value) keyword indicates that the value being passed to the 
function is a copy of the data, and not the actual data itself. This is to prevent 
accidentally changing the actual data within a function. You can also use ByRef 
(by reference) which passes the address of the data to the function, and any 
changes in the parameter are reflected in the actual data. ByVal is the default 
behavior in current versions of the compiler.
41
Break pdf password - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
add password to pdf; pdf user password
Break pdf password - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
convert protected pdf to word online; break a pdf password
As [data type]: The As keyword after the parameter list indicates the return type 
of the function. Subs do not have a return type so there isn’t an As clause after the 
parameter list.
Notice that the ceil function returns a double and not an integer, even though the 
conversion function rounds off the decimal portion. This is to prevent integer overflow for 
very large numbers. Even though ceil, and the other runtime conversion functions return 
a double you can implicitly convert them to integers by simply assigning the return to an 
integer variable or using the Cast function. Be sure to use an integer data type with a 
large enough range for the result.
To use Ceil in your program you would write 
myDouble=Ceil(aDouble)
or  
myInt=
Ceil(aDouble)
. All declaration statements follow the same pattern as Ceil.
DLLs created with Visual Basic 6
tm
and below are COM objects and not standard 
DLLs. In order to use VB6 DLLs with FreeBasic you will need to create a COM interface to 
access the DLL functions. Creating a COM interface is a complicated topic and is beyond 
the scope of this book. 
Runtime Conversion Functions
Table 5.1 lists some of the more useful conversion routines contained within the 
runtime library along with he syntax and some comments about the function.
Function
Syntax
Comment
Ceil
B = Ceil(double-type 
expression)
Ceil returns the nearest 
integer greater than 
expression.
Floor
B = Floor(double-type 
expression)
Floor returns the nearest 
integer less than expression. 
Modf
B = Modf(double-type 
expression, double-type 
pointer)
Modf returns the fractions 
part of expression and the 
integer part of expression in 
the double-type pointer. The 
integer part of expression is 
rounded towards zero.
Table 4.1: Runtime Conversion Functions
It would require another book to examine all the functions in the runtime library. The 
runtime functions presented in this book were selected because of their usefulness and 
to supplement FreeBasic’s built-in functions.
Modf deserves special mention. A function can only return a single value, the value 
defined in the As clause after the parameter list. This does not mean however that you 
cannot return more than one value from a function. Any additional values a function 
returns must be returned through the parameter list. One way to do this is to use the 
Byref keyword on parameters.  Any changes made to a byref parameter changes the 
actual data. However, you cannot use byref on external libraries, due to differences in 
42
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
convert password protected pdf to excel; break password pdf
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf password unlock; pdf print protection
calling procedures, so pointers are used instead. There are two ways to pass pointer data 
to a function; by explicitly declaring a pointer data type which you will see in the chapter 
on pointers, or by using the AddressOf operator which is explained here.
The AddressOf Operator @
When the compiler creates a variable, it allocates a portion of memory equal to the 
size of the data type. For an integer it would allocate 4 bytes and for a double it would 
allocate 8 bytes. Each memory location has an address associated with it so that the CPU 
can move data into and out of the memory location. When the compiler allocates the 
memory, the operating system returns an address for the memory location so that the 
compiler can access that location. When you are working with variables you are actually 
working with an addressable memory location in the computer. You don't have to worry 
about the address since the compiler handles all those details for you; you can just use 
the variable in your program.
However, when you need to call a function like Modf that requires a pointer to a 
variable, then you need to know the address of the variable so you can pass it to the 
function. Why can't you just use the variable name, since it is an alias for the memory 
location? The answer is in the declaration of Modf shown in listing 5.3.
1
declarefunctionmodfcdeclalias"modf"(byvalasdouble,byvalasdoubleptr)asdouble
Listing 4.2: Modf Declaration
Notice that the second parameter is defined as byval and the data type is a pointer 
(ptr) to a double-type variable. Remember that byval means “make a copy of the 
contents of the parameter and use it in the function.” If you were to simply use the 
variable name, you would be passing the contents of the memory location, whatever is in 
the variable,and not its address.
When you use a regular variable in your program, you are working with the actual 
data in the memory location associated with the variable. That is, a variable = data. If 
you define myInt as an integer and set it equal to 5, when you print myInt to the screen 
you will see 5. The pointer data type is unique in that what it contains isn't data, that is a 
value like 134, rather it contains the address of a memory location. A pointer = memory 
address. If you were to print a pointer to the screen you would see a number that doesn't 
make much sense, since what you are looking at isn't the data in the memory location, 
but the address of the data in memory.
When you first create a pointer, it doesn't point to anything. This is called a NULL 
pointer. There are a number of ways to initialize the pointer, but one method is to use the 
AddressOf operator. If you create a pointer variable such as myIntPtr you could initialize 
that pointer with code like myIntPtr=@myInt. The @ is the AddressOf operator, and 
this code snippet sets myIntPtr to the address of myInt. In other words, an initialized 
pointer variable and the AddressOf operator both return the same value, a memory 
address.
We can use this concept in the Modf function. Rather than creating a pointer 
variable, we can create a double-type variable and then use this variable with the 
AddressOf operator for the return parameter. Remember that you were able to use 
expressions with the built-in numeric conversion functions. Using the AddressOf operator 
with a variable is an expression which will be evaluated and the result, the variable 
address, will be passed along to the function.
43
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
a pdf password online; convert pdf password protected to word online
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages. Divide PDF
acrobat password protect pdf; a pdf password
The following short program illustrates this concept.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
'Needtoincludetheruntimelibrary
#include"crt.bi"
'Setupsomevariables
DimAsDoublemyDouble,FracPart,IntPart
'Setthevaluewewanttoconvert
myDouble=12.56
'Callthefunction.Noticethatweareusingtheaddressof
'operator@onIntPart.
FracPart=modf(myDouble,@IntPart)
'Gettheresult.
Print"myDouble=";myDouble
Print"Fractionalpart:";FracPart
Print"Integerpart:";IntPart
Sleep
End
Listing 4.3: addressof.bas
Analysis:
In line 1 the crt.bi is included in this program so that all the supported 
functions will be available to the program. In line 5 all of the working variables are 
declared. In line 8, the variable to be operated on is set to a decimal value. The Modf 
function is called in line 11 using the AddressOf operator to retrieve the integer portion of 
the return value. The fractional portion of the return value is loaded into the FracPart 
variable. Line 13 through 15 print out the values returned from the function. The program 
is closed in the usual way in lines 17 and 18.
In line 5 we dimension the variables we will use: myDouble is the value we want to 
convert, FracPart is the value returned by the function and IntPart is the return value that 
will be passed through the second parameter, the pointer. Notice in line 11 we are using 
the AddressOf operator in conjunction with our regular double-type variable.
Here is the output of the program.
myDouble=12.56
Fractionalpart:0.560000000000001
Integerpart:12
Output 4.1: addressof.bas
The return value of the function, .56, is the fractional part and the integer part 12, 
is the value returned through the parameter. The series of zeros ending in a 1 after the 
44
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms. Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application.
adding a password to a pdf; pdf password reset
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
create password protected pdf reader; pdf protection remover
.56 is the result of the precision conversion you will get with a double value. Remember 
in the previous sections it was mentioned that double and single data types are prone to 
rounding errors. Here you see why this is true.
Caution When you are dealing with a pointer parameter, you must be sure to pass 
the correct data type to the parameter. In the case of Modf, it is expecting a double-type 
pointer which is 8 bytes. If you pass the incorrect pointer type to a function, it may not do 
anything at all, or it may try to write to 8 bytes of memory. If the function tries to write to 
more memory than has been allocated you will see the infamous General Protection Fault 
message and your program will be shut down. Always use the proper pointer type with 
pointer parameters. General Protection Fault is a Windows term and is equivalent to a 
Segmentation Fault on Linux.
Testing the Runtime Conversion Functions
As you did with the other conversion functions, you should test these functions 
with both positive and negative numbers to see how they behave.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
'Needtoincludetheruntimelibrary
#include"crt.bi"
'Setupsomevariables
DimAsDoublemyDouble=12.56,myDouble2=­12.56
'Showthevariousconversionfunctionswith
'positiveandnegativenumbers.
Print"Ceilwith";myDouble;"returns";Ceil(myDouble)
Print"Ceilwith";myDouble2;"returns";Ceil(myDouble2)
Print
Print"Floorwith";myDouble;"returns";Floor(myDouble)
Print"Floorwith";myDouble2;"returns";Floor(myDouble2)
Print
'Waitforakeypress
Sleep
End
Listing 4.4: crtfunc.bas
Analysis:
Since these are C runtime functions, the crt.bi is included in line 2. Line 5 
shows the declaration of the working variables in the program, once again using the 
alternate Dim syntax. Lines 9 through 14 print out the return values of the functions with 
both positive and negative numbers. Lines 17 and 18 close the program.
45
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
password pdf; convert password protected pdf to word online
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
convert protected pdf to word document; copy text from protected pdf to word
Line 2 in the program includes the crt.bi which is required for using any of the 
runtime functions. In line 5 the two working double-type variables are dimensioned and 
initialized. As you can see, calling the runtime functions is exactly the same as calling 
any of the FreeBasic built-in functions. Running the program will produce the following 
output.
Ceilwith12.56returns13
Ceilwith­12.56returns­12
Floorwith12.56returns12
Floorwith­12.56returns­13
Output 4.2: crtfunc.bas
As you can see in the output, Ceil returns the nearest integer greater than the 
value. 13 is greater than 12 and -12 is less negative than -12.56. Floor does just the 
opposite; it returns the nearest integer less than the value. 12 is less than 12.56 and -13 
is more negative than -12.56. 
A Look Ahead
Normally when you use numbers in your program, you are going to do some sort of 
calculation with them. In the next chapter you will see FreeBasic's arithmetic operators, 
learn about operator precedence and explore the bits that make up a number.
46
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
password pdf files; create password protected pdf
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
convert password protected pdf to word; pdf password remover online
Exercises
1) What is the extension of files that normally contain function declarations for 
libraries?
2) What is the difference between the Ceil() and Floor() functions in the C runtime 
library?
3) What compiler directive is used to add additional files before compilation?
4) What is a common cause of a Segmentation Fault or General Protection Fault?
47
5
Arithmetic Operators
Arithmetic Operators
The Table 6.1 lists all the arithmetic operators in FreeBasic. In the table below, the 
operators will work on two or more expressions, where expression is a number, variable 
or another expression. The square brackets in the syntax column indicate optional 
additional expressions.
Function
Syntax
Comment
+ (Addition)
B = expression + 
expression [ + expression…]
Returns the sum of two or 
more expressions. 
Expression can be a 
number, variable or another 
expression.
- (Subtraction)
B = expression – expression 
[ - expression…]
Returns the difference 
between two or more 
expressions.
* (Multiplication)
B = expression * expression 
[ * expression…]
Returns the product of two 
or more expressions.
/ (Division)
B = expression / expression 
[ / expression…]
Returns the division of two 
or more expression. The 
result implicitly converted to 
the target data type. That is, 
if B is an integer, the result 
will be rounded, if B is a 
double or single, the result 
will be a decimal number.
Note: If the second 
expression evaluates to zero 
(0), then a runtime error will 
occur.
\ (Integer Division)
B = expression \ expression 
[ \ expression…]
Returns the integer result of 
division of two or more 
expressions. The result is 
implicitly converted to an 
integer.
Note: If the second 
expression evaluates to zero 
(0), then a runtime error will 
occur.
^ (Exponentiation)
B = expression^value
Returns the result of raising 
expression to the power of 
value. That is 2^2 = 2*2.
MOD (Modulo)
B = expression MOD 
Returns the remainder of 
48
Function
Syntax
Comment
expression
the implicit division of the 
expressions as an integer 
result. If expression is a 
decimal value, expression is 
rounded before the division.
- (Negation)
B = - expression
Returns the negated value 
of expression. This is the 
same as multiplying by –1. If 
expression is positive, B will 
negative. If expression is 
negative, B will positive.
( ) (Parenthesis)
B = expression operator 
( expression [operator 
expression [ (…])
Forces evaluation of 
expression. Parenthesis can 
be nested, but must be 
closed properly or a compile 
error will occur.
Table 5.1: Arithmetic Operators
You should be familiar with most of these operators from math class. Integer 
division is used when you are not concerned about the remainder of the division process. 
The Mod operator has several uses including executing some code only at certain times, 
and for creating wrap-around functions such as are likely to occur when a sprite reaches 
the edge of the screen and needs to wrap around to the other side.
When using these operators together in single statement, you must b aware of 
how FreeBasic evaluates the expression. For example, does 5 + 6 * 3 equal 33 or does it 
equal 23? FreeBasic evaluates expressions based on precedence rules, that is, rules that 
describe what gets evaluated when. Table 6.2 lists the precedence rules for the 
arithmetic operators. The order of precedence is the same order as the listing; that is the 
top row has the highest precedence, while lower rows have lower precedence.
Operator
( ) (Parenthesis)
^ (Exponentiation)
- (Negation)
*, / (Multiplication and division)
\ (Integer division)
MOD (Modulus)
SHL, SHR (Shift bit left and shift bit right)
+, - (Addition and subtraction)
Table 5.2: Precedence of Arithmetic Operators
49
The SHL and SHR operators will be discussed in the next section, Bitwise 
Operators. They are included here to show where they fall in the precedence rules.
Looking at the table and the equation 5 + 6 * 3 you can see that this will evaluate 
to 23 not 33, since multiplication has a higher precedence then addition. The compiler 
will read the expression from left to right, pushing values onto an internal stack until it 
can resolve part or all of the equation. For this equation 5 will be read and pushed, then 
the + operator will be read and pushed onto the stack. Since the + operator requires two 
operands, the compiler will read the next element of the expression which will be the * 
operator. This operator also requires two operands, so * will be pushed onto the stack and 
the 3 will be read. Since * takes priority over +, the 6 and 3 will be multiplied, and that 
value will be stored on the stack. At this point there is a 5, + and 18 on the stack. Since 
there is only one operator left and two operands, the 5 and 18 will be added together to 
make 23, which will be returned as the result of the expression.
If you wanted to make sure that 5 + 6 gets evaluated first, then you would use 
parenthesis to force the evaluation. You would write the parenthesized expression as (5 + 
6) * 3. Since the parenthesis have the highest precedence, the expression they contain 
will be evaluated before the multiplication. The evaluation process here is the same as 
the previous process. The ( is treated as an operator and is pushed onto the stack. The 5, 
+, and 6 are read followed by the ). The ) signals the end of the parenthesis operation, so 
the 5 and 6 are added together and pushed onto the stack. The * is read along with the 3. 
The stack at this point contains an 11, * and 3. The 11 and 3 are multiplied together and 
33 is returned as the result of the evaluation.
You can also embed parenthesis within parenthesis. Each time the compiler 
encounters a (, it begins a new parenthesis operation. When it encounters a ), the last ( is 
used to evaluate the items contained within the ( and ) and that result is either placed on 
the stack for further evaluation or returned as a result. Each ( must be match to a ) or a 
compiler error will occur.
The following program demonstrates both implicit evaluation and forced 
evaluation.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
OptionExplicit
DimAsIntegermyInt
'Letcompilerevaluateexpressionaccordingtoprecedence
myInt=5+6*3
Print"Expression5+6*3=";myInt
'Forceevaluation
myInt=(5+6)*3
Print"Expression(5+6)*3=";myInt
'Waitforkeypress
Sleep
End
Listing 5.1: precedence.bas
50
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested