c# itextsharp pdf page to image : Copy text from protected pdf to word software Library cloud windows asp.net web page class FBeginner7-part1254

Running the program will produce the following output.
Enteranangleindegrees?90
Pi:3.14159265358979
Degrees:90
Radians:1.5707963267949
Output 7.1: Output of degrad.bas
There are a number of on-line tutorials that you can access to brush up on your trig. A 
quick Google search on the term trigonometry brought up hundreds of sites that offer 
basic to advanced tutorials on the various trig functions that FreeBasic supports. Randy 
Keeling has written two basic tutorials on trigonometry in the Community Tutorials 
section  of the FreeBasic wiki. At the time of this writing, the wiki was located at 
http://www.freebasic.net/wiki/wikka.php?wakka=FBWiki.
Absolute Value and the Sgn Function
You would use the Abs function when you are interested in the absolute magnitude 
of a number. The absolute value of a number is the distance that number is from zero on 
the real number line. 3 is three units from 0 so its absolute magnitude is 3. -3 is also 
three units from 0 so its absolute magnitude is also 3.
The Sgn function, called the signum function in math, is related to the Abs function 
since you can express the absolute value of a number by using the Sgn function. Sgn 
returns -1 for a negative number, 0 for 0 and 1 for a positive number. To calculate the 
absolute value of a number you would use the formula |a| = a * Sgn(a), where the 
vertical lines indicate absolute value. If we replace a with -3 in the formula, you get |-3| = 
-3 * Sgn(-3), or |-3| = -3 * -1. Since multiplying a negative with a negative returns a 
positive, the result is |-3| = 3.  Replacing a with 3, the formula would evaluate to |3| = 3 * 
1, or |3| = 3.
One use of the Sgn function in programming is determining the relative positions 
of two points on the screen. If you have two points, A(5, 6,) and B(3, 4), where the first 
number is the row and the second number is the column, you can determine the relative 
position by moving the origin to point A and looking at the sign of point B. The origin (0, 
0) of the screen is located in the upper left corner. To move the origin to point A you need 
to subtract 5 from the row and 6 from the column of each point giving A(0, 0) and B(-2, 
-2). You can now use the Sgn function on the row and column components of B.
If Sgn(B.row) = -1, then the row is above A.
If Sgn(B.row) = 0, then the row is in the same row as A.
If Sgn(B.row) = 1 then the row is below A.
If Sgn(B.column) = -1 then the column is to the left of A.
If Sgn(B.column) = 0 then the column is in the same column as A.
If Sgn(B.column) = -1 then the column is to the right of A.
71
Copy text from protected pdf to word - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf owner password; pdf file password
Copy text from protected pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
create copy protected pdf; pdf password remover online
Since B is located at row -2 and column -2 after adjusting the origin, the Sgn 
function will return -1 for the row and -1 for the column. This puts point B above and to 
the left of of point A.
Logarithms
Logarithmshave a wide range of uses in mathematics, physics and biology. For 
example, the decay rate of radioactive particles is logarithmic in nature. Logarithms are a 
way of expressing exponentiation. For the following formula A
b
= x can be expressed as 
Log(x) = b where the base of the log is a. The two most commonly used logarithms are 
the natural log, which uses e (2.7182818284590452354...) as the base, and log base 10 
or the common log. The Log function in FreeBasic uses the natural log, but any log base 
can be expressed by the formula logarithm = Log(number) / Log(base)
2
.
One property of logarithms is that they can be used to multiply or divide two 
numbers together. This was a common use of logarithms before the invention of 
calculators. The following program uses the logarithm method to multiply two numbers 
together.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
OptionExplicit
Constbase10=Log(10)
DimAsDoublel1,l2,lt,al
'Calculatethelogof2.5forbase10
l1=Log(2.5)/base10
'Calculatethelogof5.6forbase10
l2=Log(5.6)/base10
'Addthelogarithms
lt=l1+l2
'Gettheantilog,whichisourbase(10)
'raisedtothesumofthelogvalues
al=10^lt
'Printresults
Print"2.5*5.6=";2.5*5.6
Print"Logmethod=";al
Sleep
End
Listing 7.2: log.bas
2
For an explanation of the natural log and e see http://www.physics.uoguelph.ca/tutorials/LOG/logbase.html.
72
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
pdf protected mode; convert password protected pdf files to word online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail
add copy protection pdf; pdf open password
Analysis:
Line 3 defines a symbolic constant, base10, that will be the base of the 
logarithm calculations. Using a constant in this manner reduces the number of 
calculations the program must perform. Instead of using two Log(10) function calls, only 
one is used in the constant definition. Line 5 declares the working variables, l1 an l2 
which are the two Logarithms of the numbers 2.5 and 5.6 and the sum of the logs, lt. al 
will be the antilog value.
Lines 8 and 10 calculate the base 10 log of the two numbers. In line 13 the 
logs are added together. Line 17 calculates the antilog, which is the base, in this case 10, 
raised to the power of the sum of the logs. Line 20 prints the result using the 
multiplication operator, and line 21 prints the result using the log method.
The program is closed in the usual way in lines 23 and 24.
Running the program produces the following result.
2.5*5.6=14
Logmethod=14
Output 7.2: Output of log.bas
As you can see from the output, adding the logarithms of the two numbers and 
then calculating the antilog of the sum produces the same result as multiplying the two 
numbers.
The C Runtime Library Math Constants and Functions
The C Runtime Library (CRT) has a number of math constants and functions that 
you can use in your programs. To use these functions you would add the line #Include
Once“crt.bi” to your program. The following table lists the math constants available in 
math.bi.
CRT Math Constants
Constants
Value
Comment
M_E
2.7182818284590452354
The base of natural 
logarithms.
M_LOG2E
1.4426950408889634074
The logarithm to base 2 of 
M_E.
M_LOG10E
0.43429448190325182765 The logarithm to base 10 of 
M_E.
M_LN2
0.69314718055994530942 The natural logarithm of 2.
M_LN10
2.30258509299404568402 The natural logarithm of 10.
M_PI
3.14159265358979323846 Pi, which is the ratio of a 
73
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Able to convert password protected PDF document.
crystal report to pdf with password; open password protected pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF file to Jpeg
break a pdf password; add password to pdf file
Constants
Value
Comment
circle's circumference to its 
diameter.
M_PI_2
1.57079632679489661923 Pi divided by two.
M_PI_4
0.78539816339744830962 Pi divided by four.
M_1_PI
0.31830988618379067154 The reciprocal of pi, that is 
1/pi.
M_2_PI
0.63661977236758134308 Two times the reciprocal of 
pi.
M_2_SQRTPI
1.12837916709551257390 Two times the reciprocal of 
the square root of pi.
M_SQRT2
1.41421356237309504880 The square root of two.
M_SQRT1_2
0.70710678118654752440 The reciprocal of the square 
root of two which is also the 
square root of 1/2.
Table 7.2: CRT Math Constants
In the example programs the value of PI was calculated. However, as you can see, 
the value of PI is available in the CRT, so it is much more efficient to use the defined 
value M_PI in your programs, rather than making the compiler perform a calculation for 
the value. The same reasoning applies to the base 10 logarithm calculation that was used 
in log.bas. Instead of calculating the base 10 log you can use the constant value M_LN10.
The various versions of the PI constants are commonly used values in calculations 
as are the versions of the square root of 2. The square root of 2, like PI, is an irrational 
number and is the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle with sides that have a unit 
length of 1. The square root of 2 is related to PI with the formula sqrt(2)=2sin(PI/4). The 
following program displays both the calculated value of the square root of 2 and the CRT 
value for comparison.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
OptionExplicit
#IncludeOnce"crt.bi"
DimAsDoublesqr2
sqr2=2*Sin(M_PI/4)
Print"CalculatedSquarerootof2:";sqr2
Print"CRTvalue:";M_SQRT2
Sleep
74
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to copy, paste, and cut image from PDF. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add for setting PDF security level; PDF text content, image and
adding password to pdf file; creating password protected pdf
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Then, copy the following lines of code to addCommand(new RECommand("Text")); _tabSignature.addCommand AppSettings.Get("resourceFolder"); protected void Page_Load
pdf password remover; change password on pdf
13
End
Listing 7.3: sr2.bas
Analysis:
Line 3 includes the CRT declaration file, crt.bi, which will enable the 
program to use the math constants and functions. The #IncludeOnce directive ensures 
that the file is only included once in the program, even if other modules also include the 
file. Line 5 declares the working variable which will hold the result of the calculation in 
Line 7. Line 9 and 10 displays the calculated value as well as the CRT defined value for 
comparison. The program is closed in the usual way.
When you run the program you should see the following output.
CalculatedSquarerootof2:1.41421356237309
CRTvalue:1.4142135623731
Output 7.3: Output of sr2.bas
As you can see from the output, the calculated value has a slightly higher precision 
than the constant value, but the difference is too small to really matter in most cases. To 
save the compiler a calculation, and thereby speeding up your program, use the defined 
value in the CRT.
Selected CRT Math Functions
There are a number of math functions declared in the CRT. Table 8.3 list three of 
the functions.
Function
Syntax
Comment
Hypot
B = Hypot(x as double, y as 
double)
Hypot returns the 
hypotenuse of sides x and y.
Log10
B = Log10(x as double)
Log10 returns the base 10 
log of x.
Pow
B = Pow(base as double, 
power as double)
Pow returns base raised to 
power.
Table 7.3: Selected CRT Math Functions
The log program in Listing 8.2 can be modified to use the CRT functions.
1
2
3
4
5
OptionExplicit
#IncludeOnce"crt.bi"
DimAsDoublel1,l2,lt,al
75
C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
Please copy the following demo code to the text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> _fid mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
break password pdf; add password to pdf without acrobat
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.js" type="text/javascript"></script Copy package file "Web.config" content to float DocWidth = 819; protected void Page_Load
a pdf password; pdf protection remover
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
'Calculatethelogof2.5forbase10
l1=Log10(2.5)
'Calculatethelogof5.6forbase10
l2=Log10(5.6)
'Addthelogarithms
lt=l1+l2
'Gettheantilog,whichisourbase(10)
'raisedtothesumofthelogvalues
al=Pow(10,lt)
'Printresults
Print"2.5*5.6=";2.5*5.6
Print"Logmethod=";al
Sleep
End
Listing 7.4: log2.bas
Analysis:
Line 3 includes the crt.bi declaration file so that the runtime functions will 
be available to the program. Line 5 declares the working variables as in the previous 
program. In lines 8 and 10, the previous calculation has been replaced with the CRT 
function log10. Line 13 adds the logarithms, which is the same as multiplying the two 
numbers, and saves the result in the variable lt. In line 17 the Pow function is used rather 
than the exponentiation operator to calculate the antilog. Lines 20 and 21 print out the 
results for comparison. The program is closed in the usual way.
When you run the program you will see that the output is the same as in the 
previous version.
2.5*5.6=14
Logmethod=14
Output 7.4: Output of log2.bas
Using the CRT functions can make your program a bit more simple, and a bit less 
error prone. Since FreeBasic uses the Microsoft runtime library the functions are stable 
and reliable, and many include optimizations that make the functions perform better than 
you could achieve by hand coding.
A Look Ahead
In addition to the standard numeric variables, FreeBasic also has the pointer data 
type, which is the subject of the next chapter.
76
8
Pointer Data Type
The pointer data type is unique among the FreeBasic numeric data types. Instead 
of containing data, like the other numeric types, a pointer contains the memory address 
of data. On a 32-bit system, the pointer data type is 4 bytes. FreeBasic uses pointers for a 
number of functions such as ImageCreate, and pointers are used heavily in external 
libraries such as the Windows API. Pointers are also quite fast, since the compiler can 
directly access the memory location that a pointer points to. A proper understanding of 
pointers is essential to effective programming in FreeBasic.
For many beginning programmers, pointers seem like a strange and mysterious 
beast. However, if you keep one rule in mind, you should not have any problems using 
pointers in your program. The rule is very simple: a pointer contains an address, not data. 
If you keep this simple rule in mind, you should have no problems using pointers.
Pointers and Memory
You can think of the memory in your computer as a set of post office boxes (P.O. 
Box) at your local post office. When you go in to rent a P.O. Box, the clerk will give you a 
number, such as 100. This is the address of your P.O. Box. You decide to write the number 
down an a slip of paper and put it in your wallet. The next day you go to the post office 
and pull out the slip of paper. You locate box 100 and look inside the box and find a nice 
stack of junk mail. Of course, you want to toss the junk mail, but there isn't a trash can 
handy, so you decide to just put the mail back in the box and toss it later. Working with 
pointers in FreeBasic is very similar to using a P.O. Box.
When you declare a pointer, it isn't pointing to anything which is analogous to the 
blank slip of paper. In order to use a pointer, it must be initialized to a memory address, 
which is the same as writing down the number 100 on the slip of paper.  Once you have 
the address, find the right P.O. Box, you can dereference the pointer, open the mail box, 
to add or retrieve data from the pointed-to memory location. As you can see there are 
three basic steps to using pointers.
1. Declare a pointer variable.
2. Initialize the pointer to a memory address.
3. Dereference the pointer to manipulate the data at the pointed-to memory location.
This isn't really any different than using a standard variable, and you use pointers 
in much the same way as standard variables. The only real difference between the two is 
that in a standard variable, you can access the data directly, and with a pointer you must 
dereference the pointer to interact with the data. The following program illustrates the 
above steps.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
OptionExplicit
'Createapointer­doesn'tpointtoanything.
DimmyPointerAsIntegerPtr
'Initializethepointertopointto1integer
myPointer=Callocate(1,Sizeof(Integer))
77
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
'Printtheaddress
Print"Pointeraddress:";myPointer
'Addsomemeaningfuldata
*myPointer=10
'Printthecontents­willnotbegarbage
Print"Memorylocationcontains:";*myPointer
'Deallocatethepointer
DeallocatemyPointer
Sleep
End
Listing 8.1: basicpointer.bas
Analysis:
In line 4 a pointer to an integer is created. The pointer doesn't point to a 
memory location yet, and if you were to try and use this uninitialized pointer, you would 
generate an error. Line 7 uses the Callocate function to set aside memory equal to the 
size of an integer, that is 4 bytes, and returns the starting address of the memory 
segment. The second parameter passed to Callocate is the size of the memory unit to 
allocate. The first parameter is the number of units to allocate. In this program, one unit 
of size integer is being allocated. 
Now that myPointer has been initialized, you can use it. Line 9 prints out contents 
of myPointer which illustrates that the variable contains a memory address and not data. 
In line 11 data is added to the memory location using the indirection operator *. The 
indirection operator tells the compiler you want to work with the data that myPointer is 
pointing to, rather than the memory address contained in the variable. Line 13 prints out 
the contents of the memory location which is now 10. 
In line 15, the memory allocated with Callocate is freed using the Deallocate 
procedure. The program is closed in the usual way.
Running the program should produce a result similar to the following output.
Pointeraddress:3089536
Memorylocationcontains:10
Output 8.1: Output of basicpointer.bas
The address printed on your computer will probably be different, since the 
operating system allocates the memory used by Callocate.
When your program terminates, all memory that was allocated in the program is freed 
and returned to the operating system. However, it is good practice to deallocate 
memory when it is no longer needed, even if it isn't strictly necessary when a program 
terminates. The better you manage your program's memory, the less chance of 
problems you will have when running the program on different computer configurations.
78
Typed and Untyped Pointers
FreeBasic has two types of pointers, typed and untyped. The preceding program 
declared a typed pointer, DimmyPointerasIntegerPtr, which tells the compiler that 
this pointer will be used for integer data. Using typed pointers allows the compiler to do 
type checking to make sure that you are not using the wrong type of data with the 
pointer, and simplifies pointer arithmetic.
Untyped pointers are declared using the Any keyword: DimmyPointerasAny
Ptr Untyped pointers have no type checking and default to size of byte. Untyped pointers 
are used in the C Runtime Library and many third party libraries, such as the Win32 API, 
to accommodate the void pointer type in C. You should use typed pointers so that the 
compiler can check the pointer assignments, unless working with libraries that require 
the void pointer.
Pointer Operators
There are two pointer operators in FreeBasic; the indirection operator and the 
addressof operator.
Operator
Syntax
Comment
* (Indirection)
[ ] (Index Access)
B = *myPointer
*myPointer = B
B = myPointer[index]
myPointer[index] = B
You can access the data in a 
pointer memory location by 
either using the indirection 
operator or using index 
access. The index format 
uses the size of the data 
type to determine the 
proper indexing. 
@ (AddressOf)
myPointer = @myVar
myPointer = @mySub()
myPointer = @myFunction()
Returns the memory 
address of a variable, 
subroutine or function. 
Table 8.1: Pointer Operators
You will notice that the addressof operator not only returns the memory address of 
a variable, but it can also return the address of a subroutine or function. You would use 
the address of a subroutine or function to create a callback function such as used in the 
CRT function qsort. Callback functions will discussed later in this chapter.
Memory Functions
FreeBasic has a number of memory allocation functions that are used with 
pointers, as shown in the following table.
Function
Syntax
Comment
Allocate
myPointer = 
Allocate(number_of_bytes)
Allocates number_of_bytes 
and returns the memory 
79
Function
Syntax
Comment
address. If myPointer is 0, 
the memory could not be 
allocated. The allocated 
memory segment is not 
cleared and contains 
undefined data.
Callocate
myPointer = 
Callocate(number_of_eleme
nts, size_of_elements)
Callocate allocates 
number_of_elements that 
have size_of_elements and 
returns the memory 
address. If the memory 
could not be allocated, 
Callocate will return 0. The 
memory segment allocated 
is cleared.
Deallocate
Deallocate myPointer
Frees the memory segment 
pointed to by myPointer.
Reallocate
myPointer = 
Reallocate(pointer, 
number_of_bytes)
Reallocate changes the size 
of a memory segment 
created with Allocate or 
Callocate. If the new size is 
larger than the existing 
memory segment, the 
contents of the memory 
segment remained 
unchanged. If the new size 
is smaller, the contents of 
the memory segment are 
truncated. If pointer is 0, 
Reallocate behaves just like 
Allocate. A 0 is returned if 
the memory segment 
cannot be changed.
Table 8.2: FreeBasic Memory Functions
These functions are useful for creating a number of dynamic structures such as 
linked lists, ragged or dynamic arrays and buffers used with third party libraries. 
When using the Allocate function you must specify the storage size based on the 
data type using the equation number_of_elements*Sizeof(datatype). To allocate 
space for 10 integers your code would look like this: myPointer=Allocate(10*
Sizeof(Integer)). An integer is 4 bytes so allocating 10 integers will set aside 40 bytes 
of memory. Allocate does not clear the memory segment, so any data in the segment will 
be random, meaningless data until it is initialized.
Callocate works in the same fashion, except that the calculation is done internally. 
To allocate the same 10 integers using Callocate your code would look like this: 
myPointer=Callocate(10,Sizeof(Integer)). Unlike Allocate, Callocate will clear 
the memory segment.
80
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested