c# pdf to image convert : Copy protected pdf to word converter online SDK control project winforms web page windows UWP GBV_Handbook_Long_Version11-part1665

102
Linking national and local coordination mechanisms
IS 4.6
Section Four: IMPLEMENTING a GBV coordination MECHANISM
wherever possible.  Sub-national structures should be identified and/or developed as quickly as 
possible after the establishment of the national coordination mechanism—ideally within the first 
month of emergency response (if not part of emergency preparedness).  It is important to note, 
however, that it may not be advisable to attempt to formalize field-based emergency coordination 
mechanisms until after the national coordination mechanism has determined its leadership and 
drafted a TOR, in so far as having an established mechanism at the national level provides a basic 
frame of reference for the development of structures at the field level.  On the other hand, if sub-
national structures are pre-existing, it will be important to engage them from the outset of any 
national coordination efforts.
Identifying membership.  These sub-national structures should be comprised of the key actors 
(health, psychosocial, security/protection) at the local levels, as well as people of concern, local GBV 
and gender experts, etc.  One of the activities while conducting a rapid assessment of GBV issues 
and programmes in the affected geographic areas should involve identifying coordination groups 
and/or coordination partners at the field level that can be mobilized to undertake emergency GBV 
coordination.  Where working with the government poses no security risks, it will be important 
to determine how to build on government structures to promote sub-national GBV coordination.  
In some settings, the Protection Cluster may field protection actors to work locally—these actors 
may be particularly well-suited to promote the initial implementation of local GBV coordination 
groups where no other options are pre-existing, and this possibility should be explored with the 
Protection Cluster at the national level in settings where the clusters have been activated.
Identifying leadership.  The IASC GBV Guidelines and the IASC template for Standard Operating 
Procedures (see IS 3.6) provide specific guidance on establishing coordination mechanisms at 
the field level.   They suggest that the national GBV coordinating agency(ies) might not be the 
same organization(s) as the regional and local GBV coordinating agencies. It is not necessary, 
and sometimes not appropriate, for the same agency to be in the coordinating role at all levels. In 
some settings, it has proven effective to have different organizations in the coordinating roles at 
different geographic levels, and in all cases it is important to build on and support local structures 
as is feasible.  Determining leadership of the field-level coordination mechanisms should be done 
by partners at the first meeting, in the same participatory manner as is done at the national level 
(see IS 4.1).  In order to support the sustainability of field-based coordination mechanisms, it may 
be preferable to identify local rather than international partners as leads and ensure they have 
sufficient technical and financial support to meet their responsibilities.
Sharing information.  Information should be shared at least monthly (and in the early stages 
of an emergency, even more often) among and between the national coordination mechanism 
and the field-based coordination mechanisms through dissemination of meeting minutes.  Other 
strategies for communication, information-sharing, problem-solving and mutual support should 
be identified in the TORs of the respective coordination mechanisms and periodically updated as 
best practices and lessons learned emerge.
Developing communication channels.  The following diagram illustrates how the local, regional 
and national coordination mechanisms may relate to one another (arrows indicate communications 
flow):
Camp/village/local GBV Working Groups
Regional GBV Working Groups
National GBV Working Group
Copy protected pdf to word converter online - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
create password protected pdf online; convert password protected pdf to word
Copy protected pdf to word converter online - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
add password to pdf file without acrobat; open password protected pdf
103
Linking national and local coordination mechanisms
IS 4.6
Section Four: IMPLEMENTING a GBV coordination MECHANISM
According the diagram, local coordination mechanisms work through regional communication 
mechanisms to share information with the national coordination mechanisms and vice versa. 
This  structure  is  probably  most  appropriate  in settings  where the emergency  extends  over 
 large  geographic  area  and/or  where communication  is  improved  by  the  introduction  of 
regional coordination groups due to the challenges of national coordination partners regularly 
communicating with local partners (such as where the Internet is not available at the local level).
Another important element of this diagram is that regional working groups, where they exist, 
should foster cross-communication amongst themselves.  This may also happen amongst local 
coordination groups, though for the reasons identified above in terms of limited communication 
options  over  a  wide  geographic  area,  cross-communication  at  this  level  may  prove  more 
challenging.  To every extent possible, the regional and national coordination groups should 
attempt to facilitate information- and resource-sharing across all local-level groups.
How do coordination mechanisms link in settings where different 
coordination groups are focusing on the needs of different populations?
In some settings, such as where there are both IDPs and refugees, sub-national coordination 
groups might form separately according to the populations they are serving.   In these instances, it 
is important that the national coordination body support and maintain strategies for information- 
and resource-sharing as is appropriate to the goals and Action Plans of the different coordination 
groups.   The national coordination body may choose to do this by, for example, developing sub-
groups at the national level to provide support to specific coordination groups at the sub-national 
level (see IS 4.5 on creating coordination sub-groups).
Resources
Establishing Standard Operation Procedures for multi-sectoral and inter-organizational prevention and  
response to GBV in humanitarian settings (SOP Guide), (IASC Gender SWG, 2008).
http://oneresponse.info/crosscutting/gender/Pages/Gender.aspx
Annexes
A52:  Northern Uganda 2008 GBV Working Groups TOR
A7:   GBV AoR Guidance Note on Determining Field-level Leadership of a GBV AoR Working 
Group
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework. This VB.NET PDF to Word converter control
create pdf password; pdf password reset
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF to Word (DOC/DOCX) converter library control (XDoc.PDF) is a
break pdf password; a pdf password online
104
Ensuring sustainability of coordination mechanisms
IS 4.7
Section Four: IMPLEMENTING a GBV coordination MECHANISM
Section Four:
IMPLEMENTING 
a GBV coordination MECHANISM
7. Ensuring sustainability of coordination mechanisms
What does ‘sustainability of coordination mechanisms’ mean?
As described in the Introduction to this handbook, emergencies occur in phases. While this 
handbook primarily focuses on the crisis stage—following the onset of an emergency—it highlights 
work that can be undertaken in the pre-crisis stage  (in terms of disaster risk reduction, contingency 
planning for emergency preparedness and response, etc.).  It is also important to anticipate and 
prepare for work that should be done during the post-crisis (stabilization) and recovery phases. 
One of the most critical issues for a GBV coordination mechanism to consider, especially after the 
initial emergency response has waned, is how to ensure that coordination mechanisms for GBV 
are continued after the cluster systems (or other humanitarian structures) have terminated—this 
is what sustainability is all about. 
Why is it important to sustain GBV coordination mechanisms after an 
emergency?
Any real efforts to eradicate GBV require long-term strategies aimed at broad-based social change 
targeting the discriminatory practices that promote and/or condone violence against women and 
girls.  GBV is a problem that does not end when the emergency phase ends, and in some instances, 
shifting from the emergency to recovery and development phases can herald increased rates of 
certain types of GBV, especially when emergency-related programming for the most vulnerable 
is discontinued.  In settings where women and girls have lost basic protective mechanisms as a 
result of the emergency (such as family, livelihoods, etc.), their vulnerability is likely to increase 
when they can no longer access the benefits of humanitarian aid and must struggle to reintegrate 
into their communities.    
In order to meet their ongoing needs, as well as to address the larger social issues that contribute 
to GBV, anti-violence work should continue in all settings:  there is no country or region in the 
world where it is not important to combat GBV.  And as this handbook highlights, that work must 
be well-coordinated: developing programmes, improving systems, changing policy, conducting 
advocacy, etc., all require the  input of multi-sectoral actors working according  to  the same 
principles and with the same understanding of the key strategic approaches to addressing GBV.
The GBV AoR’s 2008 global review of coordination mechanisms observed that in some settings where 
there  were  no GBV  coordination  activities  in  place before  the  humanitarian  crisis,  the  crisis  itself 
provided a window of opportunity to introduce coordination and to scale-up GBV programming—first 
linked to the emergency and then to other non-emergency GBV issues.  In these cases, the emergency 
demonstrated the need for and value of having a GBV-specific coordination structure and also resulted 
in the development of resources—training materials, mapping tools, etc.—that could be mainstreamed 
into sustained GBV prevention and response efforts.
Good practice
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF file to Jpeg
creating password protected pdf; a pdf password
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Able to convert password protected PDF document.
copy protected pdf to word converter online; annotate protected pdf
105
Ensuring sustainability of coordination mechanisms
IS 4.7
Section Four: IMPLEMENTING a GBV coordination MECHANISM
What are some of the strategies for ensuring the GBV coordination 
mechanism is sustained?
Ideally, a GBV coordination mechanism will be in place even before an emergency strikes, and 
in this instance, it is best to merge the emergency coordination mechanism back into pre-existing 
coordination structures (see IS 2.A.4 for a review of various options for linking  emergency 
coordination to pre-existing GBV coordination structures) that focus on recovery and development 
work.   This process should be relatively straightforward (and anticipated from the onset of the 
emergency) and will hopefully contribute to an improvement in coordination efforts based on best 
practices and lessons learned during the emergency phase.
Where GBV coordination is introduced during the emergency (i.e., there are no pre-existing 
mechanisms), it is important that the lead coordination agencies anticipate some of the challenges 
that may arise when transitioning the coordination body to a permanent structure, as described 
below.  Strategies for addressing these challenges should be developed as soon as possible during 
the emergency phase.
Capacity: Ideally, a permanent GBV 
coordination  mechanism  should 
be  government-led  in  order  to 
ensure  that  GBV  is  mainstreamed 
into  national  structures.    Where 
government  leadership  presents 
political or security problems, other 
local agencies should be identified.   
With  either  option,  it  is  often 
the  case  that  local  actors  will  not 
have  the  experience  to  coordinate 
programming for GBV.  Strategies 
should  be  developed  for  building 
capacity  of  relevant  actors  during 
the  emergency  by,  e.g.,  having  a 
government  representative  co-
chair  the  coordination  mechanism 
and,  if  possible,  shadow the  GBV 
Coordinator  in  order  to  learn  as 
much as possible about how to lead 
coordination  post-emergency.    A 
time frame should be developed for 
handing over responsibility of the coordination mechanism from humanitarian actors to 
recovery/development actors as part of the post-emergency GBV Action Plan (see IS 4.4 
on drafting an Action Plan).
Funding:  Securing financial resources for post-emergency coordination efforts is essential 
for facilitating the transition of the coordination mechanism to a permanent structure.  
Since this funding cannot be accessed through emergency streams (such as the CAP), the 
coordination mechanism will have to seek out recovery and development donors in order 
to design a funding strategy. (See IS 3.2 on various funding options.)  The lead agencies of 
the emergency coordination mechanism have a responsibility to inform donors about the 
need for ongoing funding.  
Uganda offers insight into  some of the  challenges 
associated  with  planning  the  transition  of  the 
GBV  coordination  mechanism  from  a  UN  agency 
(UNFPA)  to  the  government.  There  is  strong 
commitment to GBV coordination by the Ministry of 
Gender, Labor and  Development, but engagement 
of other line ministries remains limited.  Within the 
Ministry of Health, for example, the GBV Focal Point 
is also the focal point for gender and therefore does 
not have the time or resources to focus on GBV or 
humanitarian settings moreso than  the  rest  of  the 
country.  At the district level, government actors are 
enthusiastic, but  not enough  resources  (human  or 
financial) are allocated. As a result District Gender 
Officers  do not have  the time or capacity to  fully 
focus on gender and GBV—many are also working 
on labour issues. In order to effectively transition the 
GBV coordination mechanism from UNFPA to the 
government, strategies will need to be developed to 
scale-up resources so that GBV is prioritized within 
government work plans and budget allocations.
Lesson learned
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Convert PDF to Word (.docx); Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF Easy to copy, paste, and cut image from PDF. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add
add password to pdf reader; adding password to pdf
C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
viewer creating, you can go to PDF Web Viewer Please copy the following demo code to the head of public string mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
change password on pdf file; convert pdf password protected to word online
106
Ensuring sustainability of coordination mechanisms
IS 4.7
Section Four: IMPLEMENTING a GBV coordination MECHANISM
Advocacy:  The pressure to discontinue humanitarian-led coordination mechanisms will 
intensify as the crisis shifts into early recovery.  At this stage, the GBV Coordinator and 
other partners within the GBV coordination mechanism should be prepared to articulate 
the need to sustain coordination efforts and should have a plan ready for presentation 
to the UNCT, IASC, government, etc., about including GBV in recovery efforts.   This 
kind of advocacy may be done most effectively through a coordination sub-group that 
is specifically tasked with developing an advocacy platform related to transitioning the 
coordination mechanism from the emergency phase to recovery/development. (See IS 3.3 
on advocacy and IS 4.5 on coordination sub-groups.)
Technical resources/tools:  Many of the tools that are developed during an emergency 
can and should be used for post-emergency work.  These might include training curricula, 
assessment tools, data collection systems, SOPs, etc.  However, they will likely need to be 
adapted, not only to address the shift in focus from sexual violence during an emergency 
to broader GBV issues post-emergency, but also to accommodate the transition from 
humanitarian actors to development actors. Strategizing during the emergency phase 
about how to adapt existing resources and develop new tools will facilitate the eventual 
transition to recovery and development.
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
Copy package file "Web.config" content to public float DocWidth = 819; protected void Page_Load Demo_Docs/").Replace("\\" Sample.pdf"; this.SessionId
convert password protected pdf files to word online; adding password to pdf file
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you First, copy the following lines of C# code mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
add password to pdf without acrobat; pdf password remover online
107
Introduction
Section 5:
5
PRACTICAL coordination
SKILLS
© UNICEF/NYHQ2007-1259/Tom Pietrasik
India, 2007
109
Introduction
5
Section Five: PRACTICAL coordination SKILLS
Section Five:
PRACTICAL 
coordination SKILLS
Introduction
What is this section about?
This section, possibly the most important of the handbook, reviews basic skills in leadership, 
management and coordination. It aims to give the GBV Coordinator the tools necessary to maintain 
the momentum and the commitment of those participating in a GBV coordination mechanism by 
employing techniques aimed at promoting collaboration, mutual responsibility and consensus.  
It is  often the case in  emergencies  that  the  urgent  need  to  get something  done overwhelms 
considerations of how to engage in a productive and participatory process that has long-term 
benefits for all coordination partners, especially people of concern.   And yet, in order for any 
coordination to be effective and sustainable, the GBV Coordinator will need to be as mindful 
of the methods for coordination as s/he is of outcome.   Partners need to be encouraged to take 
responsibility from the outset of the coordination process to develop their capacity to work 
together over the long term. 
At the same time, in some contexts so much  time has been spent working on establishing 
coordination systems (e.g., through lengthy inter-agency and multi-sectoral assessments and 
situational analyses) that it has taken too long time to establish urgent services—despite the fact 
that providing urgent services is the goal of good coordination.  GBV Coordinators must find 
ways to balance their dual responsibilities:  ensuring immediate services are implemented and 
building mechanisms to coordinate those services.  Hopefully, some of the techniques outlined in 
this section will increase efficiency and effectiveness.
The skills outlined here will also be useful to those who need to work with a wide array of cluster/
sector actors, members of the community, gender advisors and others engaged in humanitarian 
action.  To this end, information from this section can be shared with GBV partners in order to 
build the competencies required to emphasize the importance of GBV prevention and response to 
key stakeholders.  
With permission from the authors, the seven information sheets from this section have been 
adapted from the Child Protection Coordinators’ Handbook 2009 for Clusters, available at: http://
oneresponse.info/GlobalClusters/Protection/CP/Pages/Child%20Protection.aspx
“Leadership is earned, it is not about declaring yourself or your agency in charge due to some global 
mandate.  It is about listening and learning and observing and supporting.  It is about treating others 
with as much respect as you’d wish them to treat you.  Leadership in the context of GBV coordination 
means offering technical input and information and supporting group-generated action.”  -From GBV 
Coordination Course Curriculum, UNFPA and Ghent University, 2010
Critical to know
110
Fostering collaborative leadership
IS 5.1
Section Five: PRACTICAL coordination SKILLS
Section Five:
PRACTICAL 
coordination SKILLS
1. Fostering collaborative leadership
What is collaborative leadership?
Collaborative leadership is a process through which individuals and organizations are encouraged 
to:
Why is collaborative leadership important to GBV coordination?
Given the multi-sectoral nature of GBV programming, any GBV coordination efforts—whether 
through the cluster system or not—must engage a wide variety of actors with different agendas 
and priorities. All of these actors, in addition to being committed to fulfilling their particular GBV-
related responsibilities, must also be committed to working with others to ensure that the whole is 
greater than the sum of its parts.  
Those responsible for facilitating collaboration must work to create an enabling environment for 
participation, problem-solving and decision-making, so that participants share responsibility and 
feel ownership of collective outcomes.   This often requires a mental and practical shift from more 
typical (and sometimes easier) authoritative leadership methods to more collaborative leadership 
methods:
Share resources
Exchange information 
Search for creative solutions to 
emerging challenges 
Enhance capacity for mutual benefit and a common purpose 
by sharing risks, rewards and responsibilities 
Exchange activities
Constructively explore 
differences
Share common goals
• 
 Leading based on line authority
• 
 Unilateral decision-making
• 
 Command and control
• 
 Implementing partners
• 
 Focus on agency interest
• 
 Being at the forefront
• 
Leading based on trust, relationships, 
services
• 
Shared decision-making and consensus 
management
• 
Facilitate, network and enable
• 
Equal partners
• 
Focus on broader sector and emergency as 
a whole
• 
Facilitating and networking ‘behind-the-
scenes’
From...
...To
111
Fostering collaborative leadership
IS 5.1
Section Five: PRACTICAL coordination SKILLS
What are the key guidelines for effective collaborative leadership?
1
What are the different styles of collaborative leadership?
Experience has shown that different situations require different leadership styles. A collaborative 
leader assesses the situation and chooses an appropriate leadership style.
1
Adapted from Hank Rubin, http://www.collaborative-leaders.org/, as presented in the Child Protection Coordinators’ 
Handbook 2009 for Clusters, at: http://oneresponse.info/GlobalClusters/Protection/CP/Pages/Child%20Protection.aspx
When 
those 
facilitating 
coordination  are  directive, 
they  initiate  action,  structure 
activities,  motivate  others  and 
give  feedback  to  participants. 
Being directive,  however, does 
not  mean  being  threatening 
and/or demanding.
 directive  style  can  be  appropriate  in  the  initial  stages  of 
establishing  the  GBV  coordination  body,  when  guidance  is 
needed on how it will work, and when frameworks, processes 
and timescales are being set. It is also useful when time is short. 
This style must be used cautiously and judiciously so that partners 
do not become accustomed to (and frustrated with) following 
directions. Even a directive style should incorporate key aspects 
of collaborative leadership.
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
9
3
Cultivate a shared vision and identity right from the start.  Make sure, for example, that 
all actors agree on the Terms of Reference for the GBV coordination mechanism in the 
earliest stages of the coordination process.
Take care to involve the right mix of stakeholders and decision-makers.  This can often be 
challenging in GBV coordination, especially in settings where GBV is a politically charged 
issue.  (See IS 4.2 for recommendations on building membership of the GBV coordination 
mechanism.)
Sustain the momentum and focus on ongoing collaboration. A reliable and regular flow 
of accurate information to all coordination partners and periodic review of coordination 
action plans and outcomes will help to achieve this.
Engage the perspectives and address the needs of each stakeholder group in the work of 
the GBV coordination mechanism. Be sure to sensitively (i.e., non-aggressively) draw out 
those whose contributions are critical but who may be overshadowed by stronger voices.
Ensure that both the process and products of the collaboration, to the greatest extent 
possible,  serve  each  participant  agency’s  self-interests.    Recognize  that  in  order  for 
participants to value collaboration, they must see some benefit for themselves!
Develop clear roles and responsibilities for GBV coordination participants (even if these 
roles and responsibilities regularly shift).  This can often be facilitated by developing sub-
groups within the coordination mechanism, as described in IS 4.6.
Secure commitments from all participants that every effort will be made to ensure that the 
same people come to each meeting.  One way to indirectly reinforce this is to make sure 
that action points of every meeting contain the names of individuals responsible, not just 
the names of organizations.
All  collaboration  is  personal  –  effective  collaboration  happens  between  people  –  so 
maintain regular communication. If you are facilitating coordination, take the time before 
coordination meetings, during breaks and after meetings to informally chat with partners.
Don’t waste time. Meetings must be efficient and productive; management must be lean 
and driven. (See IS 5.3 for more information about managing meetings.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested