c# pdf to image convert : Copy text from protected pdf control application utility azure web page winforms visual studio GBV_Handbook_Long_Version19-part1673

182
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
TARGET: IMPLEMENT SAFE FUEL-COLLECTION  STRATEGIES
1.  Assess and analyze information about the location(s), routes, means and personal safety for collecting 
cooking and heating fuel. Participate in a coordinated situational analysis.
Key Actions:
•  Consult with women and children, community leaders and 
other relevant groups.
•  Consult with the local community about their own safety 
during fuel collection and about allowing the displaced 
population safe access to collect fuel.
2.  Reduce fuel consumption by implementing saving measures.
Key Actions:
•  Provide fuel-efficient stoves to reduce the amount of fuel 
required.
 Consult with women for selection of the type of 
energy-saving fuel stove.
 Mobilize women and community leaders to promote 
the use of energy-saving stoves and to train women 
in their use.
 Add milling or other means to reduce cooking times 
for food rations.
3.  Implement strategies to increase safety and security during fuel collection.
Key Actions:
•  Mobilize the community into mixed groups of men and 
women to collect fuel.
•  Establish regular patrols with reliable security personnel to 
designated areas where organized firewood collection can 
be done by the population at specified times.
4.  When feasible and appropriate, request and ensure adequate funding to meet temporary fuel needs during 
the early stages of an emergency and/or to provide fuel to community members who are unable to collect 
their own fuel.
Key Actions:
•  Fuel that is distributed should be culturally acceptable and 
easy to use.
•  Pay attention to the issue of displaced populations selling 
firewood as a source of income and risking exposure to 
violence while collecting fuel.
•  Involve women and girls in any distribution of fuel.
•  Identify priority groups that should receive fuel if fuel 
distribution is not available for everyone.
IASC GBV Guidelines Sector Action Sheets 
Copy text from protected pdf - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
open password protected pdf; convert protected pdf to word document
Copy text from protected pdf - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
create pdf password; password on pdf
183
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
1. Coordinate with the GBV Working Group on incidents that occur during firewood collection. 
Information-sharing must be done in accordance with the guiding principle of confidentiality and 
anonymity for survivors.
Key Actions:
•  If the survivor does not give consent to refer her case to 
police/security, then incident information can be compiled 
anonymously into data reports that give no identifying 
information. 
•  Use this information to inform and problem-solve with the 
community about security risks.
TARGET: PROVIDE SANITARY MATERIALS TO WOMEN AND GIRLS
5.  Provide individual sanitary packs for all women and girls from at least 13 to 49 years.
Key Actions:
•  Estimate the number of menstruating women and girls at 
25% of the total population.
•  Consult with women and girls to identify materials most 
culturally appropriate.
•  The following can be used as a guide in preparing the first 
sanitary packs, with changes made later after consultations 
with women and girls. A basic sanitary pack for one person 
for six months:
i.  2 square metres absorbent cotton per six months OR 
12 disposable sanitary towels per month
ii.  3 underpants
iii.  250 grams of soap per month (in addition to any 
other soap distribution)
iv.  1 bucket (can last for 1 year)
•  Distribute sanitary packs at regular intervals throughout the 
emergency and distribute to any new arrivals.
6.  Actively seek participation from relevant groups in the distribution of sanitary packs.
Key Actions:
•  Consult with and facilitate the participation of women and 
girls.
•  Seek input and participation from community-based health 
providers (e.g., health promoters, animators).
7.  If there is an accurate database with disaggregated age and sex data, use that database to develop the 
distribution list for sanitary packs. If there is no database, or if it is uncertain, inaccurate or incomplete, 
collaborate with women and girls and community health providers to develop a distribution list. Avoid 
using family ration or registration cards unless there is a clear indication of sex and age breakdown.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Able to convert password protected PDF document.
a pdf password; convert password protected pdf to excel
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF file to Jpeg
convert password protected pdf to excel online; advanced pdf password remover
184
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
EDUCATION SECTOR
GBV Key Actions
TARGET: ENSURE BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ ACCESS TO SAFE EDUCATION
1.  Plan education programme using guidance from the Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies.
2.  Keep children, particularly those at the primary school level, in school or create new schooling venues 
when schools do not exist. 
Key Actions:
•  Link humanitarian services with schools.
•  Monitor drop-out lists to determine if and why children are 
leaving school.
•  If children are dropping out of school because of lack of food, 
provide school feeding.
•  Provide assistance with school fees, materials and uniforms.
•  Offer flexible school hours to accommodate children who cannot 
attend school all day due to other responsibilities.
3.  Prevent sexual violence (SV) and maximize child survivors’ access to services by raising awareness among 
students and teachers about SV and implementing prevention strategies in schools.
Key Actions:
•  Inform teachers about SV, prevention strategies, potential after-
effects for children and how to access help and SV services in the 
community.
•  Actively recruit female teachers.
•  Include discussion of SV in life skills training for teachers, girls and 
boys in all educational settings.
•  Ensure all teachers sign codes of conduct.
•  Establish prevention and monitoring systems to identify risks in 
schools and prevent opportunities for sexual exploitation and abuse 
(SEA).
•  Provide materials to assist teachers (i.e., “School in a box” and 
recreation kits that include information on gender-based violence 
and care for survivors).
•  Provide psychosocial support to teachers who are coping with their 
own psychosocial issues as well as those of their students. 
4.  Establish community-based activities and mechanisms in places where children gather for education to 
prevent abuses like SVand recruitment by armed groups.
Key Actions:
•  Provide facilities for recreation, games and sports at school and 
ensure access and use by both boys and girls. 
•  Gain community support for school-based SV programming.
•  Ensure parents and the community know about teachers’ codes of 
conduct.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
pdf password online; pdf file password
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge.
break password on pdf; create password protected pdf from word
185
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
FOOD SECURITY SECTOR
GBV Key Actions
TARGET: IMPLEMENT SAFE FOOD SECURITY PROGRAMMES
1.  Collect sex-disaggregated data for planning and evaluation of food security strategies.
2.  Incorporate strategies to prevent sexual violence (SV) in food security and distribution programmes at all 
stages of the project cycle (including design, implementation, monitoring and follow-up), giving special 
attention to groups in the community that are more vulnerable to SV.
Key Actions:
•  Target food aid to women- and child-headed households. 
Registering household ration cards in the names of women 
rather than men can help to ensure that women have greater 
control over food and that it is actually consumed.
•  For polygamous families, issue separate ration cards for each 
wife and her dependents. Carefully consider how to assign the 
husband’s food ration and give clear information to all members 
of the family (i.e., all wives).
3.  Involve women in the entire process of implementing food security strategies. Establish frequent and 
consistent communication with women in order to understand the issues that need to be addressed and 
resolved.
Key Actions for women’s participation:
•  The assessment and targeting process, especially in the 
identification of the most vulnerable.
•  Discussions about the desirability and appropriateness of 
potential food baskets.
•  Decisions about the location and timing of general food 
distributions.
•  The assessment of cooking requirements and additional tools, 
their availability within the community and the strategies in 
securing access to those non-food-items. Special attention 
should be given to this point since women could be exposed to 
SV in the process of collection of these items 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to copy, paste, and cut image from PDF. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add for setting PDF security level; PDF text content, image and
pdf protection remover; pdf protected mode
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Then, copy the following lines of code to addCommand(new RECommand("Text")); _tabSignature.addCommand AppSettings.Get("resourceFolder"); protected void Page_Load
pdf document password; pdf password security
186
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
4.  Enhance women’s control of food in food distributions by making women the household food 
entitlement holder.
Key Actions:
•  Issue the household ration card in a woman’s name.
•  Encourage women to collect the food at the distribution point.
•  Give women the right to designate someone to collect the rations 
on their behalf.
•  Encourage women to form collectives to collect food.
•  Conduct distributions at least twice per month to reduce the 
amount of food that needs to be carried from distribution points.
•  Introduce funds in project budgets to provide transport 
support for community members unable to carry rations from 
distribution points.
5.  Include women in the process of selecting the location of the distribution point. Consideration should be 
given to the following aspects:
Key Actions:
•  The distance from the distribution point to the households 
should not be greater than the distance from the nearest water or 
wood source to the household.
•  The roads to and from the distribution point should be clearly 
marked, accessible and frequently used by other members of the 
community.
•  Locations with nearby presence of large numbers of men should 
be avoided, particularly those where there is liberal access to 
alcohol, or where armed persons are in the vicinity.
6.  Establish sex-balanced food distribution committees that allow for the meaningful and equal participation 
of women. Attention should be given to the following aspects:
Key Actions:
•  Make sure food distribution is done by a sex-balanced team. 
•  Provide packaging that facilitates handling and can be re-used 
for other domestic activities.
•  Select the time of distribution according to women’s activities 
and needs, to permit the organization of groups that can travel 
together to and from the distribution point.
•  Distribute food during the day. Leave enough time for women to 
return to their homes during daylight.
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.js" type="text/javascript"></script Copy package file "Web.config" content to float DocWidth = 819; protected void Page_Load
pdf user password; password on pdf
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
First, copy the following lines of C# code to text/javascript"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> _fid mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
pdf print protection; add password to pdf
187
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
7.  Provide enough and sufficient information about distributions using a variety of methods to ensure 
communication to everyone, especially women and girls. 
Key Information:
•  The size and composition of the household food rations.
•  Beneficiary selection criteria.
•  Distribution place and time.
•  The fact that they do not have to provide services or favours in 
exchange for receiving the rations.
•  The proper channels available to them for reporting cases of 
abuse linked to food distribution.
8.  Reduce security risks at food distributions. Create “safe spaces” for women at distribution points.
Key Actions:
•  Appeal to men in the beneficiary community to protect women 
and ensure safe passage of women from distribution sites to 
their homes.
•  Ensure sex balance of those carrying out the distribution.
•  If necessary, segregate men and women receiving rations, either 
by having distributions for men and women at different times, 
or by establishing a physical barrier between them during the 
distribution.
•  Assure that food distribution teams and all staff of 
implementing agencies have been informed about appropriate 
conduct, avoidance of sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) and 
mandatory reporting. 
•  Create ‘safe passage’ schedules for child household heads.
•  Begin and end food distribution during daylight hours.
•  Consider placing two women guardians (with vests and whistles) 
to oversee off-loading, registration, distribution and post-
distribution of food. 
9.  Monitor security and instances of abuse at the distribution point as well as on departure roads.
Key Actions:
•  Ensure there are women staff present during food distributions.
•  Establish a community-based security plan for food distribution 
sites and departure roads in collaboration with the community.
•  Establish a security focal point at each of the distribution sites.
•  Monitor security on departure roads and ensure that women 
are not at an increased risk for
violence by having the food 
commodity.
188
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
GBV SECTOR
GBV Key Actions
TARGET: ENSURE THAT SURVIVORS OF SV HAVE SAFE SHELTER  
1.  When helping a survivor of sexual violence (SV), all actors must discuss safety/security issues and ensure 
that either there is no immediate threat or that she has a realistic safety plan.  She should be referred - 
with her consent - to the system for safe shelter.
2.  Mobilize the community to establish a system where survivors of SV can access safe shelter if it is not 
safe to return to their place of residence. 
Key Actions:
•  Work with women in the community to form action groups. 
•  Consult with leaders, men’s groups and women’s groups.
•  Set up structures so that survivors can stay with a family member 
or community leader. 
3.  When family- or community-based solutions cannot be found for temporary housing, a short-term safe 
shelter may be the only option. ‘Safe shelters’ should be considered as a last resort because they are 
difficult to manage, especially in the early stages of a humanitarian emergency. 
Key Actions:
•  Establish confidential referral systems.
•  Plan for the safety and security for the family/individual/staff 
providing or managing the safe shelter.
•  Develop clear guidelines and rules for managing safe shelters to 
prevent misuse and security problems. As soon as a survivor is 
referred, a longer-term arrangement should be developed. 
•  Coordinate with all key SV response actors, especially psychosocial 
services and security/protection staff.
•  Liaise with camp management and/or shelter organizations at 
the site to incorporate shelter allocation as a longer-term security 
solution.
•  Ensure that survivors have access to their food and non-food 
rations while they live in the safe shelter.
•  Ensure that survivors can be accommodated with their children in 
the shelter if they so wish.
•  Child survivors/victims should remain in their family shelters 
when possible. When this is not possible, ensure that child 
survivors receive extra attention and care at safe shelters.
189
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
TARGET: PROVIDE COMMUNITY-BASED PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT  
1.  Identify and mobilize appropriate existing resources in the community, such as traditional birth attendants 
(TBAs), women’s groups, religious leaders and community services programmes.
Key Actions:
•  Discuss issues of SV, survivors’ needs for emotional support and 
evaluate the individuals, groups and organizations available in the 
community to ensure they will be supportive, compassionate, non-
judgmental, confidential and respectful to survivors.
•  Establish systems for confidential referrals among and between 
community-based psychological and social support resources, 
health and community services.
2.  At all health and community services, listen and provide emotional support whenever a survivor discloses 
or implies that she has experienced sexual violence. Give information, and refer as needed and agreed by 
the survivor.
Key Actions:
•  Listen to the survivor and ask only non-intrusive, relevant and non-
judgmental questions for clarification only. Do not press her for 
more information than she is ready to give (i.e., do not initiate a 
single-session psychological debriefing). 
•  If the survivor expresses self-blame, care providers need to gently 
reassure her that SV is always the fault of the perpetrator and never 
the fault of the survivor.
•  Assess her needs and concerns, giving careful attention to security; 
ensure that basic needs are met; encourage but do not force 
company from trusted, significant others; and protect her from 
further harm. 
•  Ensure safety; assist her in developing a realistic safety plan, if 
needed. 
•  Give honest and complete information about services and facilities 
available.
•  Do not tell the survivor what to do, or what choices to make. 
Respect her choices and preferences about referral and seeking 
additional services.
•  Discuss and encourage possible positive ways of coping, which 
may vary with the individual and culture. 
i.  Stimulate the re-initiation of daily activities. 
ii.  Encourage active participation of the survivor family and 
community activities. 
•  When feasible and appropriate, raise the support of family 
members, but recognize that families can contribute to increased 
trauma if they blame the survivor for the abuse, reject her or are 
angry at her for speaking about SV.
190
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
3.  Address the special needs of children.
Key Actions
•  Persons interviewing and assisting chid survivors should possess 
basic knowledge of child development and SV.
•  Use creative methods to help put young children at ease and 
facilitate communication.
•  Use age-appropriate language and terms.
•  When appropriate, include trusted family members to ensure that 
the child is believed and supported in returning to normal life.
•  Do not remove children from family care in order to provide 
treatment (unless it is done to protect from abuse or neglect).
•  Never coerce, trick or restrain a child whom you believe may have 
experienced SV.  Coercion and force are often characteristics of the 
abuse, and using those techniques will further harm the child.
•  Always be guided by the best interests of the child.
4.  Organize psychological and social support, including social reintegration activities.
Key Actions
•  Always adhere to the guiding principles for action:
 Safety and security.
 Confidentiality.
 Respect the choices and dignity of the survivor.
 Non-discrimination.
•  Advocate on behalf of the survivor with relevant health, social, 
legal and security agencies if the survivor provides informed 
consent. 
•  Initiate community dialogues to raise awareness that SV is never 
the fault of the survivor and to inform community about SV and 
the availability of services.
•  Provide material support as needed via health or other community 
services.
•  Facilitate participation and integration of survivors in the 
community. 
•  Encourage use of appropriate traditional resources. Many such 
practices can be extremely beneficial; however, ensure that they 
do not perpetuate blaming-the-victim or otherwise contribute to 
further harm to the survivor.
•  Link with other sectors. 
191
A21
Section Six: Annexes
GBV Guidelines Sectoral Information Sheets
HEALTH SECTOR
GBV Key Actions
TARGET: ENSURE WOMEN’S ACCESS TO BASIC HEALTH SERVICES
1.  Implement the Minimum Initial Service Package of reproductive health in emergency situations (MISP). 
Key Actions:
•  Identify an organization(s) and individual(s) to facilitate the 
coordination and implementation of the MISP.
•  Prevent and manage the consequences of sexual violence.
•  Reduce HIV transmission by:
i.  Enforcing respect for universal precautions
ii.  Guaranteeing the availability of free condoms.
•  Prevent excess neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality by:
i.  Providing clean delivery kits for use by mothers or birth 
attendants to promote clean home deliveries
ii.  Providing midwife delivery kits to facilitate clean and safe 
deliveries at the health facility
iii.  Initiating the establishment of a referral system to 
manage obstetric emergencies.
•  Plan for the provision of comprehensive reproductive health 
(RH) services, integrated into primary health care as the situation 
permits.
2.  Conduct or participate in rapid situational analyses to address the accessibility for women and the 
availability and capacity of health services to respond to the needs of women. 
Key Actions should address:
•  The number, location, and care level of functioning health 
facilities.
•  Numbers of health staff at the different levels, disaggregated by 
sex.
•  The range of services provided related to reproductive health.
•  Obstructions to women’s and children’s access to the services: 
discrimination, security, costs, privacy, language, cultural.
•  Known reproductive health indicators and existing challenges to 
women’s health.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested