pdf to image conversion in c#.net : Break pdf password control software utility azure windows html visual studio CLS.ViStyle0-part179

C
OLUMBIA 
U
NIVERSITY 
S
CHOOL OF 
L
AW
W
ILLEM 
C. V
IS 
I
NTERNATIONAL 
C
OMMERCIAL 
A
RBITRATION 
M
OOT
HOW TO WRITE A MEMO WITHOUT GOING INSANE (MUCH) 
I.  D
IVIDE UP THE WORK INTO MANAGEABLE SIZES
! Organize: split into procedural and substantive teams, with about 3-7 pages per person.  
Designate 1 general editor for substantive, 1 for procedural. 
! Collaborate: discuss facts, laws, and, most of all, strategies as a group and sub-teams. 
Issues often overlap or have conflicting interests. A good early exercise for everyone to do 
is to write a 2-page Statement of the Facts.   
! Schedule: set early deadlines because there’s always more work to do than you realize. 
Whatever you don’t do now will be much more painful the last night/morning.   
II.  B
UILD UP THE MEMO AS YOU GO
! Standardize:  review  the  style  guide  BEFORE  you  start  writing,  especially  citation 
standards.  You’d be amazed at how many different ways there are to cite and punctuate 
things.  Use the proper font size, line spacing, paper size, and margins (but not paragraph 
numbers!) so page counts are more accurate. 
! Compile: keep a list of your citations as you go.  Each writer or section should have their 
own formatted index of authorities and cases and a list of any special abbreviations. 
! Markup Guidelines: Use formatting and symbols to mark special text. Sounds tedious 
but makes it much easier later.  If you only knew the power of Find-and-Replace. 
Use <> to surround any text that needs to be italicized, including cites, cross-
references, or in-quote emphasis.  Examples: 
! “Luke, I’m your <father>” (emphasis added)[<Vader 832>];  
! <Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabris, ad caput tuum saxum 
immane mittam>.   
Use a different font color for cites to easily distinguish them and to easily see how 
many sources you’re using. , e.g. [<Aristole 398; see also Aquinas 76>].  Note the 
<>’s are there too so we know to italicize.  [ ]’s are not enough since they’re used 
for non-cite stuff too like in-quote insertions: “You are [surely] kidding!” <>’s are 
only used for websites in the table of authorities. 
Highlight parts that require special work like cross-references and instructions, e.g. 
(see supra ¶x) or [insert funky cite here].     
Use “~P” instead of “¶” and “~S” instead of “§” because those special characters 
won’t copy over properly later, e.g. [<Statement of Claim ~P9>].  
III.  P
UTTING IT ALL TOGETHER
1. Stabilize the text.  Don’t even think of putting in text until the text is relatively finished, 
especially in terms of structure.  Since all the paragraphs are numbered, you will avoid a migraine 
by putting the text in the exact order it should be in.  Small changes, like more cites, are ok.  Go 
over all the section headings together as a team. 
2. Prepare the template.  Copy a file with all the relevant styles, preferably an old brief (though 
this file has all the styles too), and rename it for this year.  Do not delete any pages yet.  
! Update the cover with the moot #, which side the brief is for, the parties’ info (under 
the proper columns) and, of course, your names.  There’s a sample in this Guide.  
Break pdf password - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
convert password protected pdf to word; copy text from protected pdf
Break pdf password - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf password encryption; pdf protected mode
! Update the Statement of Facts, Prayer, and Summary of Argument (though SOA will 
likely change as edits progress). 
3. Carefully put in the main text.   
! Open two windows, one with the master template and the one with the text.  Change the 
font color in the text window so you can easily tell which is which.   
! Copy one ¶ or heading at a time from the text (Crtl-C). To avoid accidentally copying 
over section breaks and other funky stuff, copy from the first character of the ¶ (not 
indents or spaces!) all the way to the next-to-last character (usually the one before the 
period).  When you’re more experienced, you can copy small sections at a time. 
! In the master template, if possible, select an existing ¶ (or heading if that’s what you’re 
putting in), from the first character to the next-to-last character, then paste without 
formatting as “Unformatted Unicode Text” or “Unformatted Text” (Alt+E, S, cursor 
down, OK).   
If need be, change the style of the heading to the right level by selecting just the 
text of the heading and then selecting the appropriate style. 
Make sure the ending character is correct or add it as needed.  Check the 
previous ¶ to make sure you pasted in the right place.  Check the ¶ number. 
! If you need to add a new ¶ to the template, go to the end of an existing paragraph and 
press Enter (a few times if you want to be extra safe).  This creates new numbered ¶’s, by 
default, ready for pasting (without formatting!).   
! If you need a new header though, do as above but carefully backspace to delete just the 
number, leaving you an empty line.  Paste in the heading text (without formatting!).  
Then select only the heading text and change its style to the appropriate heading style.   
! Highlight any things that need to be fixed later, e.g. [insert cite here], but not the “see 
supra” and “infra” cross-references which we’ll do in mass later. 
! Delete leftover ¶’s or headings in the template as you go.  If you want to be extra-careful, 
change the font color of text you’ve already added in the text window. 
! Periodically save as a new file; include the time in the name, e.g. masterRE_1830.doc, 
and email to team list as backup. 
4. Other things to do.  Only one person at a time should be working on the master template to 
avoid version conflicts.  Things other people may do:  
! Editing the text for sections that haven’t gone in yet.  Researching more cites. 
! When cites are relatively stable, put together and format the tables for Authorities, Cases, 
and Abbrevs. (easy to copy in later). 
! Editing other parts as needed, particularly Summary of Arguments. 
! Napping (because it’s going to be a long night). 
5. Mass-formatting.   
! Once the main text is in, or at least a big section, you can mass format it using the power 
of Find-and-Replace and all those special markups you put in the text.  Everything here 
can be done for the Statement of Facts too—that would be good practice to start! 
! Select only the text that is ready for mass-formatting.  Leave it selected while 
formatting for all of Step No. 5. 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Success"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNSUPPORT: Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult
pdf print protection; break a pdf password
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Word to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Gif
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. FileType.IMG_JPEG); switch (result) { case ConvertResult. NO_ERROR: Console.WriteLine("Success"); break; case ConvertResult
create copy protected pdf; adding a password to a pdf
A. Italics. 
! Open the Find-and-Replace window and set it exactly as follows.  The “Find what” is 
“\<*\>” and the “Replace with” is “^&” (both without the quotes!).  For you geeks, ‘\’ 
denotes a metacharacter and “^&” means found character string. 
! Click “Replace All”.  Viola! Now all the <> text is italicized. 
B. Paragraph and section symbols. 
! Now to put in all those ¶’s and §’s.   Open a new window, insert a ¶ symbol and 
copy it into the clipboard (Crtl-C).    
! Go back to the template window, still with only the text for mass formatting 
selected.  Change the settings as follows (“~P” is our notation for ¶ and “^c” is 
Microsoft-geek for clipboard contents, also under “Special”). 
! Click “Replace All” and now you’ve got ¶’s galore.  Repeat with “~S” for §’s. 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Forms. Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free SDK library for Visual Studio .NET. Independent
pdf open password; change password on pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages. Divide PDF
pdf open password; convert protected pdf to word
C. Highlighting. 
! Almost done.  Set your highlight color to              or any other color you like.   
! Still with the text selected, use the following settings: 
! Click “Replace All”.  Repeat with “see infra”.   
! Their job done, delete all the <>’s in the selected text. 
6. Finishing touches.   
! Insert cross-references.  Once ALL the paragraphs and their numbering are set, 
have each section writer print out a copy of their section or brief and write down 
the ¶ numbers they cross-reference with supra (above, i.e. lower ¶ number) or 
infra.  Insert cross-references accordingly.  
Cross-check the cites Once ALL the cites are in and the tables prepared, cross-
check them.  1 or 2 people to check that everything in the tables is actually cited in 
the main text (and properly formatted!).  2 or 3 people to check the main text that 
sources cited in the text are listed in the tables.  Everyone should work off their own 
copy or printout of the master file.  Focus on cites alone.
! Make the cites normal.  Once all the cites are checked, select the main text and 
set highlighting to None and the font color to Automatic. 
Save stranded text.  After all the tables and text are set, go through the tables and 
text to make sure no source entries are cut up and no headings are separated from 
their section.  Insert lines as needed.  Make sure authors in the Authorities table don’t 
look funny too, e.g. a first initial dangling on its own line.  Adjust font size to fix.
! Update the TOC (right-click on the table, Update Fields, Entire Table; might 
have to do it again to update the page numbers).  The TOC should be updated 
only after all the tables and text (including cites) are set.  Read through the 
TOC, especially to check that page numbers are lined up.  If some page numbers 
are weird, you might have to shorten the headings for that page.  
! Check the Statement of Facts, Summary of Argument, and Prayer.   
! Cover-to-cover review.  Preferably with multiple, fresh eyes.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms. Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application.
password on pdf file; add password to pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
password pdf files; convert password protected pdf to excel
5
STYLE GUIDE FOR THE VIS MOOT COURT  
Columbia University Vis Moot Court Team 
G
ENERAL 
M
EMORANDUM 
S
ET
-U
P
Title Page 
Table of Contents 
List of Abbreviations 
Index of Authorities 
Index of Cases 
Statement of Facts 
Summary of Argument 
Argument 
Prayer for Relief 
P
AGE 
S
ETUP
Paper: A4 format (more space than letter size) 
Margin: 1 inch on all sides (2500
m
m) 
Font: Garamond, 12 point 
Spacing: 1.5 
Alignment: justified 
Hyphenation: use this function only if really need to save space or if justification distorts the 
way the page looks 
P
AGE 
N
UMBERING
The title page is unnumbered. 
The section “Table of Contents” through “Index of Cases” is numbered using lower-case 
Roman numerals.  Each item begins on a new page. 
The section “Statement of Facts” through “Prayer for Relief” is numbered using Arab numerals.  
Neither the Summary of Arguments nor the Prayer for Relief must start on a new page.  The 
Argument Section must start on a new page. 
To be able to format this numbering, you must create section breaks (“starting with the next 
page”) after the title page and after the index of cases.
C# TWAIN - Query & Set Device Abilities in C#
device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's not supported tell stop.
annotate protected pdf; copy protecting pdf files
C# TWAIN - Install, Deploy and Distribute XImage.Twain Control
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. device.TwainTransferMode = method; break; } if (method == TwainTransferMethod.TWSX_FILE) device.TransferMethod = method; } // If it's
copy text from protected pdf to word; break password pdf
6
T
ITLE 
P
AGE
The title page should look something like this. Note the use of tables here and in the Prayer. 
M
ILLIONETH 
A
NNUAL 
W
ILLEM 
C. V
IS 
I
NTERNATIONAL 
C
OMMERCIAL 
A
RBITRATION 
M
OOT
M
EMORANDUM FOR 
R
ESPONDENT
On Behalf of: 
Against: 
Mediterraneo Dufus S.A.
.
Equatoriana Buffoonus Ltd.
.
23 Unreasonable Lane
e
415 Could Not Have Been Unaware Centre
e
Conformity City
y
Breach Beach
h
Mediterraneo
o
Equatoriana
a
RESPONDENT
T
CLAIMANT
T
C
OLUMBIA 
U
NIVERSITY 
S
CHOOL OF 
L
AW
L
ORD 
B
LACKSTONE 
· A
LBERTUS 
D
UMBLEDORE 
· L
UDWIG 
B
EETHOVEN 
T
HOMAS 
A
QUINAS 
· T
HREE 
S
TOOGES 
· G
ENGHIS 
K
HAN  
C# TWAIN - Specify Size and Location to Scan
foreach (TwainStaticFrameSizeType frame in frames) { if (frame == TwainStaticFrameSizeType.LetterUS) { this.device.FrameSize = frame; break; } } }.
adding password to pdf file; creating password protected pdf
C# TWAIN - Acquire or Save Image to File
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. if (device.Compression != TwainCompressionMode.Group4) device.Compression = TwainCompressionMode.Group3; break; } } acq.FileTranfer
add password to pdf without acrobat; pdf passwords
7
T
ABLE OF 
C
ONTENTS
The Table of Contents should tell a story.  It should encapsulate the legal argument and must be 
persuasive. 
The Table should be formatted basically the same way as the outline.  However, it need not 
necessarily go as deep (include as many sub-headings) as the actual outline. 
The Table should contain the page numbers of the list of abbreviations, index of authorities, 
index of cases, statement of facts, summary of argument, the various sub-sections of the 
argument, and the prayer for relief. 
O
UTLINE 
F
ORMAT
This formatting is used for headings in the body of the text.  It should be used for the table of 
contents as well, but in a simplified version (no underlining or italics, bold only for “Part” 
heading).  For uniformity throughout, use styles to define the various headings. 
PART ONE: PROCEDURAL ISSUES (all caps, bold) 
I. 
P
ROCEDURAL 
I
SSUE 
O
NE 
(small caps, bold) 
A.  Sub-Issue One (normal, bold) 
1. 
Point one
(normal, underlined) 
2. 
Point two
a. 
Sub-point one (italics, expanded spacing) 
b. 
Sub-point two 
i. 
Detail one (italics, normal spacing) 
ii. 
Detail two 
B.  Sub-Issue Two 
II.  P
ROCEDURAL 
I
SSUE 
T
WO
PART TWO: SUBSTANTIVE ISSUE ONE 
Etc. 
H
EADINGS IN GENERAL
Headings should be formulated as full sentences and convey an argument. 
They must be followed by a period. 
L
IST OF 
A
BBREVIATIONS
The List of Abbreviations should contain a list of shortened words (e.g. “cir.” for “circuit”), 
acronyms (“NYBOT” for “New York Board of Trade”), Latin words (e.g. “e.g.” for “exemplum 
8
gratii [for example]”), country names (e.g. “Ger.” for “Germany”), and symbols (e.g. “§/§§” for 
“section/sections”). 
I
NDEX OF 
A
UTHORITIES AND 
I
NDEX OF 
C
ASES
The Index of Authorities should be sorted by books/articles.  The Index of Cases should be 
sorted by country.  The Indexes should provide full bibliographical information and an 
indication of the short form used in the Argument section.  The short form of cases should, if 
applicable, include a reference to the country in which the (court) case was heard. 
It is easiest to format the Indexes (and also the List of Abbreviations) by using a table with 
invisible lines (which are, however, visible to you in Word).  You do this by formatting the table 
to have “no boarders”. 
Example for Index of Authorities
Schlechtriem, Peter (ed.)  Commentary on the UN Convention on the International 
Sale of Goods, 2
nd
Ed. 
Oxford University Press, New York 1998 
Cited as: Author in Schlechtriem 
Smit, Hans 
“Case-Note on Esso/BHP v. Plowman (Supreme Court of 
Victoria)”  
11(3) Arbitration International 299 (1995) 
Cited as: Smit, Case Note 
UNCITRAL 
Secretariat Commentary on the 1978 Draft of the CISG 
Cited as: Sec. Comm. 
Example for Index of Cases
France 
Cour d’appel Grenoble, France, 23 October 1996, CLOUT 
Case No. 205 (Revue critique de Droit International Privé 
756 (1997) 
Cited as: CLOUT Case 205 (Fra.) 
Ste. Calzados Magnanni v. Sarl Shoes General 
International – S.G.I., Cour d’Appel de Grenoble (France), 
96J/00101, 21-10-1999 
Cited as: Ste. Calzados v. Sarl Shoes (Fra.) 
9
Other 
ICC Case No. 4126 (1984) 
reprinted in Collection of ICC Arbitral Awards 1974-1985, 
551 (1990) 
Cited as: ICC Case No. 4126 
Iran Final Award 600-48501 
Cited as: Iran Award 600-48501 
S
UMMARY OF 
F
ACTS
The Summary of Facts should be no longer than two pages.  It should name all events relevant 
to the case.  Dates and defined terms are provided in bold.  Defined terms are named following 
the long-form of the term in parentheses and quotation marks.  Where possible, define terms as 
short forms to be used in the main body of the argument (e.g. “Equatoriana Government Cocoa 
Marketing Organization” can be reduced to “EGCMO”).  All facts must be cited to some source 
in the Competition Materials.   
Terms such as Buyer, Seller, Claimant, Respondent, Obligor, Obligee are supposed defined 
terms and are capitalized.  When referring to these terms, never use the definite article to label 
them (“the”). 
In all likelihood, Claimant and Respondent will be corporate entities.  In that case, refer to them 
by the pronoun “it” (singular – NOT “they”).  Take care not to confuse “its” and “it’s”! 
In the Statement of Facts, dates should be cited in the format “24 February 2002”.  In the body 
of the argument, a shorter form should be used (e.g. “24 Feb. 2002”). 
Example (excerpt)
On 24 February 2002, Respondent informed Claimant that a storm had destroyed cocoa stocks 
in Equatoriana (“the Storm”) and that the Equatoriana Government Cocoa Marketing 
Organization (“EGCMO”) was imposing an embargo (“the Embargo”) on exports of cocoa 
through at least March (“the 24 Feb. letter”) [Cl. Ex. 3]. 
S
UMMARY OF 
A
RGUMENT
The Summary of Argument basically contains the introduction to each of the major sub-sections 
of the argument (the “chapeaus”, see below).   
It should be divided by the parts contained in the main argument (Part one, part two, etc.). 
Ideally, the summary should be no longer than a page. 
A
RGUMENT 
S
ECTION
: A
RGUMENT 
S
ET
-
UP
10
Remember to use IRAC.  It should be employed both at the macro and micro level. 
Issue 
Rule 
Application 
Conclusion 
In general, move from Principle 
Rule 
Analysis.  The law should go upfront. 
Also: Use topic sentences!   
The topic sentences of each section/sub-section/sub-sub-section/etc. should make the 
argument (they may repeat the headings to some extent).  You should be able to understand the 
outline just by looking at the topic sentences.  They should be forceful. 
A
RGUMENT 
S
ECTION
: C
HAPEAU
In introductory sections, frame the issue (create a “chapeau”, i.e. do some sign posting) 
Name most important arguments in table-of-contents style (signal location of info) 
(Possibly) Name key facts on which you will be relying 
Example
PART  II:  THE  FLEXOPRINT  MACHINE  DID  NOT  CONFORM  TO  THE 
CONTRACT. 
38. The Machine delivered to Claimant was not of the quality and description required by the 
contract, under which it was understood that the machine should be able to print on papers and 
foils as thin as 8
m
m (I).  Nor was the Machine fit for the particular purpose made known to 
Respondent, which was to print on 8
m
m-thick confectionary foil (II).  Based on the nature of the 
negotiations between Claimant and Respondent and the nature of Claimant’s prior exposure to 
the used Machine it bought, Claimant could not have known of the non-conformity (III).  
Consequently, Respondent is liable for the damages arising from the non-conformity of the 
Machine (IV). 
A
RGUMENT 
S
ECTION
: P
ARAGRAPH 
N
UMBERING
Each paragraph in the argument section is numbered.  It should be numbered in the margin.  To 
do this, create a separate style for the paragraphs and apply outline format. 
A
RGUMENT 
S
ECTION
: L
ENGTH
The argument section plus the statement of facts and summary of arguments should be no 
longer than 35 pages. 
A
RGUMENT 
S
ECTION
: C
ITATIONS
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested