pdf to image conversion in c#.net : Password protected pdf Library application class asp.net html web page ajax GoodGovernance0-part1846

GOOD
GOVERNANCE
PRACTICES FOR
THE PROTECTION
OF HUMAN RIGHTS
UNITED NATIONS
O
FFICE
OF
THE
U
NITED
N
ATIONS
H
IGH
C
OMMISSIONER
FOR
H
UMAN
R
IGHTS
Password protected pdf - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
adding password to pdf file; create password protected pdf reader
Password protected pdf - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
break pdf password; creating password protected pdf
OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
GOOD GOVERNANCE PRACTICES FOR
THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS
UNITED NATIONS
New-York and Geneva, 2007
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Online Remove Password from Protected PDF file. Download Free Trial. Remove password from protected PDF file. Find your password-protected PDF and upload it.
copy text from protected pdf; add password to pdf file without acrobat
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Change converted image size in Visual Basic program. Able to convert password protected PDF document. Source codes for quick integration in VB.NET class.
pdf password; add password to pdf file
II
Note
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publi-
cation do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of 
the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, 
territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its 
frontiers or boundaries.
*
* *
Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined 
with figures. Mention of such a figure indicates a reference to a United Nations 
document.
*
* *
Material contained in this publication may be freely quoted or reprinted, provid-
ed credit is given and a copy of the publication containing the reprinted material 
is sent to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 
Palais des Nations, avenue de la Paix 8-14, CH–1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland.
HR/PUB/07/4
UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION
Sales No. E.07.XIV.10
ISBN 978-92-1-154179-3
Photo credits
© International Labour Organization/J. Maillard (left)
© UNICEF/HQ06-1473/Giacomo Pirozzi (centre)
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support for customizing image size. Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. Open source codes can be added to C# class.
pdf user password; password pdf files
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
pdf password remover online; copy protecting pdf files
III
CONTENTS
Page
Introduction 
1
I.    STRENGTHENING DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS 
9
A. Institutionalizing public participation in local development – South  
Africa 
10
B.  Strengthening women’s political representation through networking
and lobbying – Palestine 
12
C. The role of the media in building the capacity of rights-holders 
to participate in local decision-making – Philippines 
15
D. Strengthening human rights and managing confl ict through a
participatory, inclusive and transparent constitution-making process – 
Albania 
17
E.  A governance system responsive to the needs of the HIV/AIDS-
affected population – Brazil 
20
F.  Promoting the political participation of indigenous groups 
and managing confl ict – Norway 
23
Further reading 
26
II.   IMPROVING SERVICE DELIVERY 
29
A. Education services adapted to the needs of the rural poor – Uganda 
30
B.  Strengthening institutional capacities to improve family protection
services – Jordan 
32
C. Equitable access to social services through a transparent budget
process – Ecuador 
35
D. Improving access to health services through intercultural mediation –
Romania 
38
E.  Social entitlements to promote social inclusion – France 
40
Further reading 
43
III.   THE RULE OF LAW 
45
A. Implementing civil rights in the prison system through capacity
development and empowerment – Malawi 
45
B.  Legal and policy reform for the protection of the rights of migrant
workers – Republic of Korea 
48
C. Implementing the right to effective remedy and redress for the
victims of torture – Chile 
51
D. A bill of rights to strengthen human rights in legislation and policy –
Australia 
53
Further reading 
57
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source code is available for copying and using in .NET Class.
break a pdf password; acrobat password protect pdf
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Can I use RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging & splitting toolkit SDK to split password-protected PDF document using Visual C# code?
pdf password recovery; pdf file password
IV
IV.   COMBATING CORRUPTION 
59
A. Government response to corruption: institutional development and
political leadership – Botswana 
60
B.  Empowering the public against corruption by publishing
administrative procedures and fees – Lebanon 
63
C. Transparency in public expenditures through participatory social
auditing – India 
65
D. Combating bribery in the public health sector – Poland 
68
E.  Municipal reform to combat corruption and improve the delivery
of services – Bolivia 
71
F.  Addressing the supply side of corruption: curbing bribery by
companies supported by export credit agencies – OECD 
74
Further reading 
77
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights would 
like to thank the many individuals and organizations that provided comments, 
suggestions and support for the preparation of this publication. It wishes to thank 
in particular Katia Papagianni, who had primary responsibility for the research 
and writing of the publication, and Marianne Haugaard, Nadia Hijab and Laure-
Hélène Piron, who reviewed it. It also wishes to express particular thanks to the 
United Nations Development Programme’s Oslo Governance Centre and its Bra-
tislava Regional Centre, the World Bank, UNAIDS (Brazil), the Organisation for 
Economic Co-operation and Development, the Department for Education and 
Skills of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Depart-
ment for International Development of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland (Jordan), Australian Capital Territory Human Rights Office, the 
Batory Foundation (Poland), Colgate University, International Orthodox Christian 
Charities (Romania), the Lebanese Transparency Association, the Open Society 
Institute, Penal Reform International, the Roma Center for Social Intervention 
and Studies (Romani CRISS), the University of Costa Rica and the University of 
Teesside.
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
PDF Document Protect. PDF Password. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add password to PDF; Allow users to remove password from PDF;
add copy protection pdf; convert protected pdf to word online
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored.
pdf open password; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online
1
INTRODUCTION
The former United Nations Commission on Human Rights emphasized, in a 
number of resolutions, the importance of an environment conducive to the full 
enjoyment of all human rights. It also underlined that good governance and hu-
man rights were mutually reinforcing and that the former was a precondition 
for the realization of the latter. Building on these resolutions, the Commission 
asked the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights 
(OHCHR) to provide practical examples of activities that strengthened good gov-
ernance and promoted human rights.
In response to this request, OHCHR is publishing Good Governance Practices 
for the Protection of Human Rights. This publication presents 21 case studies of 
governance reforms that have helped to better protect human rights. It builds on 
the Seminar on good governance practices for the promotion of human rights, 
which OHCHR organized in cooperation with the Government of the Republic 
of Korea and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Seoul in 
September 2004.
Purpose
This publication aims to help fill the gap between human rights standards and 
principles, on the one hand, and their implementation through governance in-
terventions, on the other. Those engaged in governance reforms frequently won-
der about the relevance of human rights to their efforts. How can human rights 
principles be meaningfully brought into governance reforms? What types of pol-
icies and initiatives do these principles translate into? Once States have adopted 
appropriate legal frameworks, how can they and other social actors improve 
implementation through governance reforms?
By presenting innovative efforts from around the world to design and carry 
out governance reforms and protect human rights, this publication attempts 
to show how governance can be reformed to contribute to the protection 
of human rights. The hope is also that, in so doing, this publication will in-
spire reformers, including Governments, human rights activists, development 
practitioners, national human rights commissions and national civil society 
organizations.
How are good governance and human rights linked?
Good governance and human rights are mutually reinforcing. Human rights prin-
ciples provide a set of values to guide the work of Governments and other polit-
ical and social actors. They also provide a set of performance standards against 
which these actors can be held accountable. Moreover, human rights principles 
inform the content of good governance efforts: they may inform the development 
of legislative frameworks, policies, programmes, budgetary allocations and other 
measures. However, without good governance, human rights cannot be respect-
ed and protected in a sustainable manner. The implementation of human rights 
2
relies on a conducive and enabling environment. This includes appropriate legal 
frameworks and institutions as well as political, managerial and administrative 
processes responsible for responding to the rights and needs of the population.
This publication defines good governance as the exercise of authority through 
political and institutional processes that are transparent and accountable, and 
encourage public participation. When it talks about human rights, it refers to the 
standards set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and elaborated 
in a number of international conventions that define the minimum standards to 
ensure human dignity (see box).
It explores the links between good governance and human rights in four areas, 
namely democratic institutions, the delivery of State services, the rule of law 
and anti-corruption measures. It shows how a variety of social and institutional 
actors, ranging from women’s and minority groups to the media, civil society and 
State agencies, have carried out reforms in these four areas.
When led by human rights values, good governance reforms of democratic insti-
tutions create avenues for the public to participate in policymaking either through 
formal institutions or informal consultations. They also establish mechanisms for 
the inclusion of multiple social groups in decision-making processes, especially 
locally. Finally, they may encourage civil society and local communities to for-
mulate and express their positions on issues of importance to them.
In the realm of delivering State services to the public, good governance reforms 
advance human rights when they improve the State’s capacity to fulfil its respon-
sibility to provide public goods which are essential for the protection of a number 
of human rights, such as the right to education, health and food. Reform ini-
tiatives may include mechanisms of accountability and transparency, culturally 
sensitive policy tools to ensure that services are accessible and acceptable to all, 
and paths for public participation in decision-making.
When it comes to the rule of law, human rights-sensitive good governance ini-
tiatives reform legislation and assist institutions ranging from penal systems to 
courts and parliaments to better implement that legislation. Good governance 
initiatives may include advocacy for legal reform, public awareness-raising on 
the national and international legal framework, and capacity-building or reform 
of institutions.
Finally, anti-corruption measures are also part of the good governance framework. 
Although the links between corruption, anti-corruption measures and human 
rights are not yet greatly explored, the anti-corruption movement is looking 
to human rights to bolster its efforts. In fighting corruption, good governance 
efforts rely on principles such as accountability, transparency and participation 
to shape anti-corruption measures. Initiatives may include establishing institu-
tions such as anti-corruption commissions, creating mechanisms of information-
sharing, and monitoring Governments’ use of public funds and implementation 
of policies.
3
Methodology
The publication is organized around the above-mentioned governance themes:
Strengthening democratic institutions
Improving service delivery
The rule of law
Combating corruption
Each chapter comprises geographically diverse case studies. Given the goal of 
illustrating the conditions under which specific initiatives came about and the 
strategies through which they were implemented, each case study presents the 
background to the initiative, its achievements and the main challenges it faces.
In preparing the publication, OHCHR relied on several submissions from Gov-
ernments on their experiences with governance reforms to improve human rights 
protection. A desk study of secondary resources was subsequently carried out 
to cover the gaps emerging from the submissions. In this process, a number of 
organizations shared their expertise and were consulted on the practices 
included in this publication. OHCHR did not undertake any direct research in 
the countries or the projects included here.
The case studies are indicative of the efforts that took place in specific settings. 
They are innovative initiatives in terms of the social partnerships they created, the 
legal and principled arguments they relied on or the institutions and processes they 
devised. However, initiatives that have made a positive contribution in one setting 
cannot simply be transferred to another. A one-size-fits-all approach is not appro-
priate for addressing the complex obstacles to legal, social and institutional reform 
which improves the protection of human rights. It is therefore hoped that the case 
studies will offer ideas and inspire practitioners and reformers, who can then adapt 
them to their particular conditions. It is also hoped that, through the sharing of 
experiences, the publication will generate further discussion and research.
Human rights standards
Human rights are set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 
1948 and codified and further spelled out in a series of international conven-
tions. These lay down the minimum standards to ensure human dignity, 
drawing on the values found in different religions and philosophies. More-
over, Governments worldwide have agreed that these conventions constitute 
an objective set of standards by which they can be judged. These instruments 
are applicable in the countries that have ratified them.
The core conventions are:
The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial 
Discrimination (1965)
4
Lessons
The recurrent lessons emerging from the case studies are:
1. 
National legal frameworks compatible with human rights principles are essential 
for the protection of human rights
Legislation based on human rights principles can strengthen a culture of hu-
man rights and lead to human rights-sensitive policies by State and civil society 
organizations.
The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966)
The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 
(1966)
The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination 
against Women (1979)
The Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrad-
ing Treatment or Punishment (1984)
The Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989)
The International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All 
Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (1990)
Each of these core conventions is monitored by a committee, to which coun-
tries report on their progress. Development practitioners working on good 
governance will find these committees’ concluding observations on country 
reports of specific interest and practical application, since they provide an 
objective assessment of how far a country has come in realizing human 
rights as well as the remaining gaps, some of which can be addressed 
through and by development programmes.
Also of practical application are the general comments that these commit-
tees make about what fulfilling a specific right actually means. These are 
particularly helpful in setting process and outcome indicators for develop-
ment programmes, although such indicators must, of course, be tailored to 
the local and the project context.
More information on the above conventions and their monitoring mecha-
nisms is available at:  http://www.ohchr.org.
In the future, two recently adopted treaties will also begin to have an impact 
on the protection of human rights around the world. They are:
The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006)
The International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from 
Enforced Disappearance (2006)
5
In this publication, the cases from Australia and the Republic of Korea discuss the 
role of civil society, of the judiciary and of political leaders in reforming laws. The Bill 
of Rights adopted in the Australian Capital Territory strengthened the Government’s 
awareness of human rights when designing and implementing public policies. The 
case from the Republic of Korea, on the other hand, points out the tangible benefits 
of legal reform to thousands of illegal immigrants residing in the country. The cases 
also demonstrate that capacity-building may improve governance in institutions such 
as the police, courts and prisons. In Malawi, reformed prison procedures expedited 
the processing of cases, while human rights training of prison personnel and of the 
prisoners themselves improved their awareness of rights.
2. 
Public participation and diverse social partnerships are vital for the protection of 
human rights
The protection of human rights is not an exclusively government affair. This pub-
lication finds that public participation contributes to policies which respect civil 
and political as well as economic, social and cultural rights. Also, policies result-
ing from participatory processes are likely to be perceived as legitimate by the 
population. There are many ways of creating avenues for public participation, in-
cluding ad hoc public hearings, advisory boards or formal consultative bodies.
The case studies present several examples of partnerships among national and 
provincial governments, local authorities, the media, non-State actors, and civil 
society. In the Philippines, media organizations worked with civil society, local 
governments and local communities to provide sustained input in local affairs. 
In Brazil, national parliamentarians worked with civil society and networks of 
experts from States and municipalities to fight against HIV/AIDS.
3. 
Negotiation and consensus-building assist the transformation of social and legal 
practices for the protection of human rights
Societal reform is a conflict-ridden process, which may be improved by a num-
ber of good governance practices. These include: the provision of credible and 
objective information about specific social problems; the use of research evi-
dence to foster informed debate and discussion on social problems; the framing 
of debates in language and principles familiar to the specific country context, 
but also compatible with human rights principles; and transparency in decision-
making. Without wide consensus, social reform may not be sustainable. In 
Australia, for example, extensive public debate took place before the Bill of 
Rights was adopted in the Capital Territory.
4. 
Access to information and transparency contribute to the protection of human 
rights
Transparency in the formulation and implementation of public policies em-
powers the public to access social services and demand protection of their rights. 
The cases demonstrate, for example, that facilitating the public’s access to infor-
mation can be a powerful strategy in improving public spending and protecting 
economic and social rights.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested