Grammar
of Poetry
Student Edition
Pdf document password - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
acrobat password protect pdf; protected pdf
Pdf document password - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
password on pdf; annotate protected pdf
Published by Canon Press
P.O. Box 8729, Moscow, ID 83843 
800.488.2034  |  www.canonpress.com
Matt Whitling, Grammar of Poetry / Student Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Matt Whitling. 
Copyright © 2012 by Canon Press.
First Edition 2000 by Logos Press
Second Edition 2012 by Canon Press
Cover design by Rachel Hoffmann.
Interior layout and design by Lucy Zoe.
Printed in the United States of America.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be 
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in 
any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, 
recording, or otherwise, without prior permis sion of the 
author, except as provided by USA copyright law.
12  13  14  15  16  17  18    
10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2   1
Whitling, Matt.
Grammar of Poetry: Student Edition / Matt Whitling ;
ISBN-13: 978-1-59128-119-1
ISBN-10: 1-59128-119-9
Library of Congress Data: 
Available on website
ImItatIon In wrItIng serIes
Grammar of Poetry is part of the Imitation in Writing series, designed to teach the art and 
discipline of crafting delightful prose and poetry.
POETRY
Poetry Primer
Grammar of Poetry 
LITERATURE
Aesop’s Fables
Fairy Tales
Medieval Legends
Greek Myths
Greek Heroes
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
NET. How to Use C#.NET XDoc.PDF Component to Convert PDF Document to Various Document and Image Forms in Visual C# .NET Application.
break pdf password; password pdf files
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve this via password.
create password protected pdf from word; copy from protected pdf
canonpress
Moscow, Idaho
Grammar
of Poetry
Student Edition
Matt Whitling
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
in Visual Studio .NET project. Support to add password to PDF document and edit password on PDF file. Able to protect PDF document
convert protected pdf to word; pdf file password
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
XDoc.PDF SDK provides users secure methods to protect PDF document. C# users can set password to PDF and set PDF file permissions to protect PDF document.
change password on pdf file; pdf owner password
grammar of Poetry
iv
Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,
Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend
More than cool reason ever comprehends.
The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
Are of imagination all compact:—
One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, —
That is the madman: the lover, all as frantic,
Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt:
The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,
Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven;
And, as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
A local habitation and a name.
Such tricks hath strong imagination,
That, if it would but apprehend some joy,
It comprehends some bringer of that joy;
Or in the night, imagining some fear,
How easy is a bush supposed a bear!
—Shakespeare
A Midsummer Night's Dream
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
pdf open password; adding a password to a pdf using reader
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET Program. Free PDF document processing SDK supports PDF page extraction, copying and pasting in Visual Studio .NET project.
pdf password reset; password pdf
v
student edition
Contents
Preface 
IX
Lesson One: Introduction and Epiphany Chart 
1
Lesson Two: How to Read Poetry 
5
MOdULE I: 
9
Lesson Three: Simile (trope) 
11
Lesson Four: Rhyme 
17
Lesson Five: Using a Rhyming Dictionary 
21
MOdULE II:  
25
Lesson Six: Metaphor (trope) 
27
Lesson Seven: Meter (Part 1) 
31
Lesson Eight: Meter (Part 2) 
35
MOdULE III:  
39
Lesson Nine: Pun (trope)  
41
Lesson Ten: Iamb (foot) 
47
Lesson Eleven: Iambic Imitation 
53
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
pdf password remover online; adding a password to a pdf file
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document in C# Using .NET PDF Control. Easy to compress & decompress PDF document file in .NET framework.
change password on pdf; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
grammar of Poetry
vi
MOdULE IV:  
55
Lesson Twelve: Personification (trope) 
57
Lesson Thirteen: Trochee (foot) 
63
Lesson Fourteen: Trochaic Imitation 
69
MOdULE V:  
71
Lesson Fifteen: Synecdoche (trope) 
73
Lesson Sixteen: Anapest (foot) 
79
Lesson Seventeen: Anapestic Imitation 
85
MOdULE VI:  
87
Lesson Eighteen: Hyperbole (trope) 
89
Lesson Nineteen: Dactyl (foot) 
95
Lesson Twenty: Dactylic Imitation 
99
MOdULE VII:  
101
Lesson Twenty-One: Onomatopoeia (trope) 
103
Lesson Twenty-Two: Alliteration 
107
Lesson Twenty-Three: Alliterative Imitation 
113
vii
student edition
MOdULE VIII:  
117
Lesson Twenty-Four: Rhetorical Question (trope) 
119
Lesson Twenty-Five: Refrain 
127
Lesson Twenty-Six: Refrained Imitation 
133
MOdULE Ix:  
135
Lesson Twenty-Seven: Oxymoron (trope) 
137
Lesson Twenty-Eight: Spacial Poetry 
145
Lesson Twenty-Nine: Spacial Imitation 
153
Lesson Thirty: Euphemism (trope) 
155
APPEndIcEs 
159
Appendix A - Poetry Anthology 
161
Appendix B - Glossary 
169
[This page intentionally left blank]
ix
student edition
PREFACE
A dEfEnsE Of ThE cLAssIcAL                 
TOOL Of IMITATIOn
Scripture commands us to imitate the Lord Jesus Christ. We are also 
commanded to imitate those brothers and sisters who, through faith and 
patience, have inherited the promises. To imitate something or someone 
means: 
•  To do or try to do after the manner of; to follow the example of; to 
copy in action.
•  To make or produce a copy or presentation of; to copy, reproduce.
• To be, become, or make oneself like; to assume the aspect or 
semblance of; to simulate.
This God-sanctioned method of learning is an essential tool for 
educating young people.  Consider how we go about teaching a child to 
perform skills such as throwing and catching. 
“Hold your hands like this,” we say. “Step forward as you throw like this.”
“Look at this ‘A’. Trace this letter. Now, you try to make an ‘A’ like this one.” 
This is imitation, and it extends beyond writing.  At Logos School, for 
example, students learn how to paint by imitating master painters of the 
past. “Students, this is a good painting. Let’s see if you can reproduce it.”  
Regardless of whether we are teaching music, reading, or math, imitation 
very often provides the best starting block in instruction in any of these 
areas. 
Educators in seventeenth century England valued imitation as a tool 
to teach style, particularly in the area of writing. These English grammar 
schools primarily employed a method of imitation called the Double 
Translation. 
grammar of Poetry
x
Consider these steps that were used in a Double Translation after the teacher translated a Latin work 
into English: 
1. The student copied the English translation over paying close attention to every word and its 
significance. 
2. The student wrote the English and Latin together one above the other making each language 
answer to the other. 
3. The student translated the original Latin to English on his own. (This was part one of the Double 
Translation). 
4. Ten days later the student was given his final English translation and required to turn it back 
into good Latin.
Benjamin Franklin wrote of a similar exercise that he employed to educate himself a century later. As 
a young man, he came across a particular piece of writing that he delighted in, The Spectator, a series of 
555 popular essays published in 1711 and 1712. These essays were intended to improve manners and 
morals, raise the cultural level of the middle-class reader, and popularize serious ideas in science and 
philosophy. These well written essays contained a style Franklin felt eager to emulate. Here Franklin 
explains his method of “double translation” regarding The Spectator: 
“With the view (imitating this great work) I took some of the papers, and making 
short hints of the sentiments in each sentence, laid them by a few days, and when, 
without looking at the book, tried to complete these papers again, by expressing 
each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any 
suitable words that should occur to me. Then I compared my Spectator with the 
original, discovered some of my faults,  and corrected them.”
He became aware of his need for a greater stock of words in order to add variety and clarity of 
thought to his writing. 
“Therefore I took some of the tales in the Spectator, and turned them into verse; and, 
after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the prose, turned them back again.            
I also sometimes jumbled my collection of hints into confusion, and after some weeks 
endeavored to reduce them into the best order, before I began to form the sentences 
and complete the subject. This was to teach me method in the arrangement of 
thoughts. By comparing my work with the original, I discovered many faults and 
corrected them; but I sometimes had the pleasure to fancy that, in particulars of small 
consequence, I had been fortunate enough to improve the method or the language, 
and this encouraged me to think that I might in time become to be a tolerable English 
writer, of which I was extremely ambitious.”
This Imitation In Writing series seeks to provide instruction in writing using the classical tool of 
imitation.  As we begin imitation in poetry, we will employ a similar method to what Franklin described. 
We will find poems of truth, beauty, and goodness and emulate them, and maybe if we’re diligent, we 
might in time become tolerable writers, too. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested