pdf to image conversion in c# : Copy from protected pdf Library control class asp.net web page .net ajax Castalia+-+User+Manual1-part5

11 
To see how we can use the 
Castalia
input script to do something more exciting, ask for 
help. Run it with 
-h
as argument. 
~/Castalia/Simulations/radioTest$ ../../bin/Castalia -h 
Usage: Castalia [options] 
Options: 
-h, --help            show this help message and exit 
-c CONFIG, --config=CONFIG 
A list of configuration names to use, comma 
separated configurations will be joined 
together, configurations listed in brackets  
will be interleaved 
-i FILE, --input=FILE 
Select input configuration file, default is 
omnetpp.ini 
-d, --debug           Debug mode, will display results from each  
CastaliaBin execution 
-o FILE, --output=FILE 
Select output file for writing results,        
generated from current date by default 
-r N, --repeat=N      Number of repetitions for each unique  
scenario  
We see that we can instruct the 
Castalia
script to use a specific file with the 
-i
switch 
(although we do not need to in our case, omnettpp.ini is the default) and use the 
-c
switch to 
choose a configuration within this file. For the moment do not mind the help-text mentioning 
that a list of configuration can be given, and just run it with one configuration. Let‟s use 
General
, which is always present in an  omnetpp.ini file and is considered the default 
configuration.  
~/Castalia/Simulations/radioTest$ ../../bin/Castalia -c General 
Running configuration 1/1 
You‟ve just run your first simulation! Let‟s see what‟s new in ou
r directory. 
~/Castalia/Simulations/radioTest$ ls 
100806-222319.txt  Castalia-Trace.txt  omnetpp.ini 
There are 2 new files created: 
100806-222319.txt
is Castalia‟s standard output file and 
its name is in the form 
YYMMDD-HHMMSS.txt
 You can freely rename this file if you wish. 
Copy from protected pdf - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
break a pdf password; break pdf password online
Copy from protected pdf - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
password pdf; add password to pdf
12 
You can also open it to read it (it is human readable) but it is not supposed to be viewed this 
way. Normally you will process this file with 
CastaliaResults
. We will see how to do 
this in section 3.3. The other file produced is a trace file named 
Castalia-Trace.txt
. It 
contains a  trace  of all  events that  you requested to  be recorded 
by  “turning  on”  some
parameters in the omnetpp.ini file. By default all tracing is turned off, but for this simulation 
example we wanted to activate just the tracing from the application module of node 0. Open 
the file and have a look. 
~/Castalia/Simulations/radioTest$ less Castalia-Trace.txt 
0.027540267327  SN.node[0].Application       Not sending packets 
3.868527053713  SN.node[0].Application       Received packet #18 from node 1 
4.068529304763  SN.node[0].Application       Received packet #19 from node 1 
4.268531555813  SN.node[0].Application       Received packet #20 from node 1 
4.468533806863  SN.node[0].Application       Received packet #21 from node 1 
4.668536057913  SN.node[0].Application       Received packet #22 from node 1 
… 
Each line is a trace event. The first item in the line is the simulation time that the event 
happened. Second item is the full name of the module that produced this trace line. In the 
example above all lines are produced by the Application module of node 0. Finally, the last 
item is the trace message itself. In the example above most messages notify us of packet 
received by node 1, also printing the packet‟s serial number.
But what is this simulation supposed to do?  
We created the radioTest simulation scenarios so users can see the results of realistic 
modeling and also see some of Castalia‟s features in action. The first scenario (the General 
configuration we just run) tests reception, as a receiver (node 0) moves through the area of 
two transmitters (nodes 1 and 2). The transmitters are placed far enough so there is no 
interference between them.  The receiver moves in a straight line back and forth and when it 
is close to each of the two transmitters it should receive their packets. For this simulation we 
have turned off shadowing effects so that the successful-reception-distance is identical for the 
two transmitters (still there are random effects in the radio reception, so the numbers of 
received  packets  by  the  two  transmitters  are  not  identical).   The  InterferenceTest1  and 
InterferenceTest2 scenarios have the receiver static and one of the transmitters moving. The 
idea there is to show the effect of interference with the use of mobility. In InterferenceTest1 
the interfering node passes through the middle of the distance between node 1 and 0, and thus 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Able to convert password protected PDF document.
crystal report to pdf with password; change password on pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF file to Jpeg
pdf passwords; add password to pdf without acrobat
13 
just  causes  collisions.  In  InterferenceTest2  though  it  passes  very  close  to  the  receiver 
(compared to the other transmitter) and thus even though initially it creates collisions, when 
sufficiently close, its SINR is high enough for its packets to be received (despite interference 
from the transmissions of static node 1). Figure 3 illustrates these interactions.  
Figure 3: The General, InterferenceTest1, and InterferenceTest2 configurations 
Run the other two simulation scenarios and look at the resulting Castalia-Trace.txt files 
(delete the old trace files if you do not want the new traces appended in the old file).  
~/Castalia/Simulations/radioTest$ rm Castalia-Trace.txt 
~/Castalia/Simulations/radioTest$ Castalia -c InterferenceTest1 
Running configuration 1/1 
Are the traces as expected? You should be able to see the patterns of reception and 
breaking of reception as depicted in figure 3.  
Let‟s us look more deeply into
the omnetpp.ini file. 
Node 0 
Node 2 
Node 1 
Node 0 
Node 1 
Node 2 
Node 2 
Node 1 
Node 0 
Receiver node 
Transmitter node 
Receive pcks from node 1 
Receive pcks from node 2 
collision 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
copy protecting pdf files; convert protected pdf to word online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source code is available for copying and using in .NET Class.
change password on pdf file; pdf password remover
14 
3.2  Understanding the configuration file 
As described in Chapter 2, Castalia has a modular structure with many interconnecting 
modules. Each one of the modules has one or more parameters that affect its behavior. An 
NED file (file with extension .ned in the Castalia source code) defines the basic structure of a 
module by defining its input/output gates and its parameters. In the NED file we can also 
define default values for the parameters. A configuration file (usually named omnetpp.ini and 
residing in the Simulations dir tree) assigns values to parameters, or just reassigns them to a 
different value from their default one. This way we can build a great variety of simulation 
scenarios. Open the file 
Simulations/radioTest/omnetpp.ini
Note that any string after a 
#
character is a comment. The configuration file starts with 
the General section. Every OMNeT configuration file has a General section. There you define 
the basic scenario that this file describes. Parameters such as the simulation time and number 
of nodes do not have any default values and must be defined in this section. Below are the 
first few lines from the 
radioTest/omnetpp.ini
file (comments removed)  
[General] 
include ../Parameters/Castalia.ini 
sim-time-limit = 100s 
SN.field_x = 200        # meters 
SN.field_y = 200        # meters 
SN.numNodes = 3 
The first line in the General section is an include command. As the name suggests, the 
command includes the contents of the file it gets as an argument. In the particular example we 
include a file we named Castalia.ini and it contains some basic parameter assignments
2
that 
every Castalia simulation needs. So when you create a Castalia configuration file, always 
include Castalia.ini in it.  
Then we define the simulation time (here assigned to 100 secs). This is the only generic 
OMNeT parameter  we  assign in a Castalia configuration file. We can see that all other 
parameter start their name with 
SN
. SN is the topm
ost composite module (or “network” as 
OMNeT calls it). The name SN stands for Sensor Network. There are a few parameters that 
2
Castalia.ini assigns some parameters affecting general OMNeT execution, as well as parameters that 
map the different Random Number Generators (RNGs) to modules. 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to copy, paste, and cut image from PDF. PDF Document Protect. PDF Password. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add password to PDF; Allow
pdf password unlock; advanced pdf password remover
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Then, copy the following lines of RasterEdge_Demo_Docs/pdf/demo_1.pdf" })); _tabDemoFiles.addCommand AppSettings.Get("resourceFolder"); protected void Page_Load
add password to pdf file with reader; pdf owner password
15 
the network takes such as the field size, the number of nodes, and the deployment type. The 
field size is given by 3 real numbers, each for axes x,y,z. One can define only 2 of the axes if 
desired (the third one will take the value 0 by default). Number of nodes is given by an 
integer. The parameter 
SN.deployment
is a string that describes where the nodes are 
placed on the field. If left undefined (as in our example above) then the location of the nodes 
is determined  by  the  xCoor, yCoor, zCoor parameters of each node. These  are usually 
manually assigned in the omnetpp.ini file. When defined, 
SN.deployment
can be one of 
the following types:   
“uniform”
nodes are placed in the field using a random uniform distribution 
“NxM”
N and M are integer numbers. Nodes placed in a grid of N nodes by M nodes 
“NxMxK” 
same as above but for 3 dimensions  
“randomized
_
NxM”
a grid deployment with randomness in the position of the nodes. 
If Gx and Gy is the grid spacing in axes x and y, and (Xi, Yi) are 
the grid position of node i then the randomized grid position is 
(Xi+Rx, Yi+Ry) where Rx and Ry are numbers uniformly drawn 
from [(-1/3)Gx
…(1/3)
Gx ] and [(-
1/3)Gy…(1/3)Gy ]
“randomized
_
NxMxK” 
same as above but for 3 dimensions 
“c
enter
node put in the centre of the field 
We can even define mixed deployments by using this string format:  
[N1..N2]->type;[N2..N3]-
>type;…  where Nx are node IDs, and t
ypes is one of the options 
given above 
After we set these top level parameters, we go into setting module parameters. When 
setting a module parameter, the full name of  the module is given revealing the  module 
hierarchy structure. Here is an example from our configuration file, setting some parameters 
of the wireless channel. 
# important wireless channel switch to allow mobility 
SN.wirelessChannel.onlyStaticNodes = false 
SN.wirelessChannel.sigma = 0 
SN.wirelessChannel.bidirectionalSigma = 0 
We will explain the meaning and use of all parameters in Chapter 4 (Modeling in 
Castalia).  In  this  section  we  present  some  basic  concepts  and  syntax  rules  of  Castalia 
configuration files. 
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
Copy package file "Web.config" content to public float DocWidth = 819; protected void Page_Load Demo_Docs/").Replace("\\" Sample.pdf"; this.SessionId
convert protected pdf to word; convert password protected pdf files to word online
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you First, copy the following lines of C# code mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
copy text from protected pdf to word; add password to pdf reader
16 
For instance, how do we set radio parameters? Remember that the radio is part of the 
Communication composite module of every node. So there are as many Radio modules as 
there are nodes. How do we set all of them easily? 
Here‟s how
SN.node[*].Communication.Radio.RadioParametersFile = 
"../Parameters/Radio/CC2420.txt" 
SN.node[*].Communication.Radio.TxOutputPower = "-5dBm" 
These two lines set 2 parameters of the Radio module. The RadioParametersFile is a 
specially formatted file defining the basic operational properties of a radio (more on Chapter 
4). The second parameter, TxOutputPower sets the power that the radio transmits its packets. 
Notice how we access all the radio modules in all the nodes with the use of [*].  
The sensor network compound module (SN) contains many Node sub-modules. These 
are addressed in the form of an array. For ins
tance, here‟s how to set
the parameter 
xCoor
(the x coordinate of the location of a node) of the node with ID=9: 
SN.node[9].xCoor = 10.5 
However, most of the time we need to massively assign values for all the nodes of the 
sensor network. This is possible by using wildcards like: 
[*]
all indexes 
[3..5]
indexes 3,4,5 
[..4]
indexes 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 
[5..]
indexes 5 till the last one 
Reading on in our example omnetpp.ini file we see that parameters relating to the 
maximum allowed packet size are set in all communication layers:  
SN.node[*].Communication.Routing.maxNetFrameSize = 2500 
SN.node[*].Communication.MAC.maxMACFrameSize = 2500 
SN.node[*].Communication.Radio.maxPhyFrameSize = 2500 
We have already set the kind of radio we want to use, by setting RadioParametersFile.  
How do we instruct Castalia which MAC protocol and which Routing protocol to use? This is 
achieved by two Communication module parameters 
SN.node[*].Communication.MACProtocolName 
SN.node[*].Communication.RoutingProtocolName 
These are set by default to "
BypassMAC
" and "
BypassRouting
". These are module 
names that in essence implement no MAC functionality and no Routing functionality. For the 
radioTest simulation we did not need any MAC or Routing so we left these parameters 
17 
assigned to their default value (i.e., they are not mentioned in the omnetpp.ini file). If you 
want to see the default values for any parameter just go to the .ned file that describes that 
module. For the parameters mentioned above you can look in: 
src/node/communication/CommunicationModule.ned
If you look at the BANtest/omnetpp.ini you will see MACProtocolName being assigned 
SN.node[*].Communication.MACProtocolName = "BaselineBANMac" 
The important thing to note here is that by assigning a name to this parameter we are 
also choosing a specific module  for our  MAC. So by altering these parameters we can 
dynamically control the composition of modules in our simulation
3
. The consequence of this 
feature is that depending on the module you choose, the parameters available to you are also 
changing since different MAC modules support different parameters. There are four kinds of 
modules that are dynamically selected in a Castalia configuration file. We have already seen 
the  2  kinds:  MAC  and  Routing  modules.  The  other  2  are  Application  modules  and 
MobilityManager modules.  
Here is how we set our radioTest simulation to use the Application module we want: 
SN.node[*].ApplicationName = "ThroughputTest" 
SN.node[*].Application.packet_rate = 5 
SN.node[*].Application.constantDataPayload = 2000 
# application's trace info for node 0 (receiving node) 
# is turned on, to show some interesting patterns 
SN.node[0].Application.collectTraceInfo = true 
By  setting  the 
ApplicationName
we  also  choose  the  application  module. 
ThroughputTest
application has all nodes sending traffic to a sink node. We can easily 
modify the packet rate and the packet size as you can notice. The sink node is by default node 
0 and we have not changed this here. Also notice how the last line shown above, activates the 
collecting of traces for the Application module of node 0. This is why the 
Castalia-
Trace.txt
files  we examined in section 3.1 were created and  this is  why they  only 
contained  events from the  application  module  of  node  0. All Castalia modules  have  a 
collectTraceInfo
parameter. By default, collection of traces is deactivated (parameter 
set to false).   
3
This is achieved thanks to OMNeT‟s dynamic module loading capability and also its ability to define 
parametric module names in .ned files. 
18 
Then follows a section where we set the starting locations for our 3 nodes manually 
(remember that we left 
SN.deployment
to its default value: 
“custom”). We write “starting 
locations”  because  the  nodes  can  be  mobile.  Indeed
 we  see  that  node  0  is  using 
LineMobilityManager
as the mobility manager module. The other two nodes have the 
default mobility manager: 
NoMobilityManager
, which is used to describe static nodes. 
SN.node[0].xCoor = 0 
SN.node[0].yCoor = 0 
SN.node[1].xCoor = 50 
SN.node[1].yCoor = 50 
SN.node[2].xCoor = 150 
SN.node[2].yCoor = 150 
SN.node[0].MobilityManagerName = "LineMobilityManager" 
SN.node[0].MobilityManager.updateInterval = 100 
SN.node[0].MobilityManager.xCoorDestination = 200 
SN.node[0].MobilityManager.yCoorDestination = 200 
SN.node[0].MobilityManager.speed = 15 
The 
LineMobilityManager
module moves the node in a straight line segment 
(back and forth). The straight line segment is defined by the starting location of a node and 
the destination location given by the xCoorDestination, yCoorDestination parameters of the 
mobility module. We also define the speed and the update interval that the wireless channel 
module will be updated of 
the node‟s current position.
After these lines we see a new section: a new configuration.  
[Config InterferenceTest1] 
SN.node[0].MobilityManagerName = "NoMobilityManager" 
SN.node[1].MobilityManagerName = "NoMobilityManager" 
SN.node[2].MobilityManagerName = "LineMobilityManager" 
SN.node[0].xCoor = 10 
SN.node[0].yCoor = 50 
SN.node[1].xCoor = 0 
SN.node[1].yCoor = 50 
SN.node[2].xCoor = 5 
SN.node[2].yCoor = 0 
19 
SN.node[2].MobilityManager.updateInterval = 100 
SN.node[2].MobilityManager.xCoorDestination = 5 
SN.node[2].MobilityManager.yCoorDestination = 100 
SN.node[2].MobilityManager.speed = 5 
In this configuration, node 2 is the mobile one, instead of node 0, and nodes are much 
closer to each other (so that we can simulate interesting interference behaviour). 
Yet another configuration section follows with slightly different node locations, which 
we do not show here. Instead we draw your attention at the end of the file, where a very short 
configuration section resides. Here it is: 
[Config varyInterferenceModel] 
SN.node[*].Communication.Radio.collisionModel = ${InterfModel=0,1,2} 
Notice how we do not assign just one value to the parameter but a series of values. This 
is a feature of OMNeT 4.0 and later versions. You can look at the OMNeT manual for a 
complete list of the ways you can assign parameters, but the essence of this multiple-value 
assignment is that simulation will run many times, each time assigning one of the values. So 
given the example above we will run the simulation 3 times. The name “InterfModel”
in the 
curly braces will just be used as a label in the output produced and helps us parse the output 
more easily. 
If you have more than one parameter that takes multiple values, then all combinations 
will be run. In the example below we have 2 parameters taking 3 values each, which means 9 
possible parameter combinations, thus 9 simulation runs. 
SN.node[1].Communication.Radio.TxOutputPower = ${TxPower="-5dBm", "-10dBm", "-15dBm"} 
SN.node[0].Communication.Radio.CCAthreshold = ${CCAthreshold=-95, -90, -85}   
You can even do more complicated things such as putting constraints, so that not all 
possible combinations are 
executed. Here‟s an example from
BANtest/omnetpp.ini
SN.node[*].Communication.MAC.scheduledAccessLength = ${schedSlots=6,5,4,3} 
SN.node[*].Communication.MAC.RAP1Length = ${RAPslots=2,7,12,17} 
constraint = $schedSlots * 5 + $RAPslots == 32 
The example above will only execute 4 combinations: (6,2), (5,7), (4,12), (3,17). 
20 
3.3  Using the Castalia and CastaliaResults scripts 
OMNeT allows you to choose just one of the configurations defined in a configuration 
file. That is, if you use the simulator binary directly (i.e. 
CastaliaBin
) you can choose an 
input configuration file and one configuration. When choosing a configuration the parameters 
from the General section are used and set, and if the configuration redefines them, then their 
value  is  overwritten.  Although  this  feature  is  an  improvement  over  older  versions,  its 
usefulness is limited. Notice for example, the configuration on varying the collision model we 
examined earlier. If we choose it using 
OMNeT‟s st
andard feature it will only be applied in 
the General section scenario. If we would like the same effect in the Interference scenarios 
then we would have to explicitly include that line in each configuration. If we also wanted to 
vary the Tx power but not vary the collision model, then we would have to explicitly write 
another set of configurations. The problem is that you cannot easily combine configurations. 
You have to explicitly write the combinations. Furthermore, you cannot easily execute more 
than one configuration at a time.  We can overcome these restrictions by using the Castalia 
script. 
With the Castalia script we can easily give a list of configurations to be combined.  
For example, we ca
n write “Castalia –
c InterferenceTest1,varyInterferenceModel
” or 
Castalia 
c InterferenceTest2,varyInterferenceModel
”  no need  to create the combination 
explicitly in the omnetpp.ini file. Moreover we have the ability to define more than one 
configuration to be executed by listing different configurations in braces. Castalia 
c [A,B] 
will  execute  the  simulation  with  configuration  A  and  then  another  simulation  with 
configuration B.  
Castalia 
c [A,B]C,D[E,F]    will execute 4 combined configurations: 
A,C,D,E  
this is a combination (or concatenation) of the 4 simple configs listed   
B,C,D,E 
A,C,D,F 
B,C,D,F 
If you try to combine two or more configurations that have at least one overlapping 
parameter (i.e. same parameter is defined in two or more configurations) then you will get an 
error message from the script. For example if you tried:  
radioTest$ Castalia -c InterferenceTest1,InterferenceTest2 
ERROR: conflicting values for parameter 'SN.node[2].xCoor' in base 
configurations: '5' and '22' 
Let us use the power of the 
Castalia
script to run a useful simulation: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested