pdf to image conversion in c# : Adding password to pdf file application control utility azure web page .net visual studio CF_WelfarePracticehandbook18-part33

169
By the end of 4 years
Movement
Hops and stands on one foot up to 5 seconds
• 
Goes upstairs and downstairs without support
• 
Kicks ball forward
• 
Throws ball overhand
• 
Catches bounced ball most of the time
• 
Moves forward and backward with agility
• 
Hand and 
Finger Skills
Copies square shapes
• 
Draws a person with 2 to 4 body parts
• 
Uses scissors
• 
Draws circles and squares
• 
Begins to copy some capital letters
• 
Language 
Has mastered some basic rules of grammar
• 
Speaks in sentences of 5 to 6 words
• 
Speaks clearly enough for strangers to understand
• 
Tells stories
• 
Cognitive
Correctly names some colours
• 
Understands the concept of counting and may know a few 
• 
numbers
Tries to solve problems from a single point of view
• 
Begins to have a clearer sense of time
• 
Follows 3-part commands
• 
Recalls parts of a story
• 
Understands the concepts of ‘same’ and ‘different’ 
• 
Engages in fantasy play
• 
Social
Interested in new experiences
• 
Cooperates with other children
• 
Plays ‘Mom’ or ‘Dad’
• 
Increasingly inventive in fantasy play
• 
Dresses and undresses
• 
Negotiates solutions to conflicts
• 
More independent
• 
Emotional
Imagines that many unfamiliar images may be ‘monsters’
• 
Views self as a whole person involving body, mind, and 
• 
feelings
Often cannot tell the difference between fantasy and reality
• 
Appendix 5: Child Development Checklist 0-5 years
Adding password to pdf file - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
a pdf password online; acrobat password protect pdf
Adding password to pdf file - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf print protection; a pdf password online
170
By the end of 5 years
Movement
Stands on one foot for 10 seconds or longer 
• 
Hops, somersaults 
• 
Swings, climbs 
• 
May be able to skip
• 
Hand and 
Finger Skills
Copies triangle and other shapes 
• 
Draws person with body 
• 
Prints some letters 
• 
Dresses and undresses without help 
• 
Uses fork, spoon and (sometimes) a table knife 
• 
Usually cares for own toilet needs
• 
Language
Recalls part of a story 
• 
Speaks sentences of more than 5 words 
• 
Uses future tense 
• 
Tells longer stories 
• 
Says name and address
• 
Cognitive
Can count 10 or more objects 
• 
Correctly names at least 4 colours 
• 
Better understands the concept of time 
• 
Knows about things used every day in the home (money, 
• 
food, appliances)
Social
Wants to please friends 
• 
Wants to be like friends 
• 
More likely to agree to rules 
• 
Likes to sing, dance and act 
• 
Shows more independence and may even visit a next-door 
• 
neighbour by him/herself
Emotional
Aware of gender 
• 
Able to distinguish fantasy from reality 
• 
Sometimes demanding, sometimes eagerly cooperative
• 
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2011), Developmental 
Milestones.
Child Protection and Welfare Practice Handbook
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
program. Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of
break password pdf; pdf document password
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
If you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file.
add password to pdf preview; copy text from protected pdf to word
171
Appendix 6: Parental issues that can impact 
on parenting capacity
1.  Unborn Child
Key concerns
Protective factors
Genetic transmission of some forms 
• 
of mental illness.
Foetal damage brought about 
• 
by intake of harmful substances. 
The impact will depend on which 
substances are taken, the stage 
of the pregnancy when drugs and 
alcohol are used, and the route, 
amount and duration of drug or 
alcohol use.
Foetal damage as a result of 
• 
physical/domestic violence. This may 
include foetal fracture, brain injury 
and organ damage.
Spontaneous abortion, premature 
• 
birth and low birth weight, and still 
birth.
Good regular antenatal care.
• 
Adequate nutrition, income support 
• 
and housing for the expectant 
mother.
The avoidance of viruses, 
• 
unnecessary medication, smoking, 
illicit drug or alcohol use, and severe 
stress.
Support for the expectant mother of 
• 
at least one caring adult.
An alternative, safe and supportive 
• 
residence for expectant mothers 
subject to violence and the threat of 
violence.
2.  Children aged 0-2 years
Key concerns
Protective factors
Drugs and alcohol use and violence 
• 
during pregnancy may have caused 
neurological and physical damage to 
the baby.
Babies may be neglected physically 
• 
and emotionally to the detriment of 
their health.
The child’s health problems may 
• 
be exacerbated by living in an 
impoverished physical environment.
Cognitive development of the infant 
• 
may be delayed through parents’ 
inconsistent, under-stimulating and 
neglecting behaviour.
Children may fail to develop a 
• 
positive identity because they are 
rejected and are uncertain of who 
they are.
Babies suffering withdrawal 
• 
symptoms from foetal addiction may 
be difficult to manage.
The presence of an alternative or 
• 
supplementary caring adult who can 
respond to the developmental needs 
of babies.
Sufficient income support and good 
• 
physical standards in the home.
Regular supportive help from primary 
• 
healthcare team, social services, 
extended family, including consistent 
day care.
An alternative, safe and supportive 
• 
residence for mothers subject to 
violence and the threat of violence.
Appendix 6: Parental issues that can impact on parenting capacity
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
WinFoms project. Support protecting PDF file by adding password and digital signatures with C# sample code in .NET Class. Feel free
pdf open password; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
convert password protected pdf to word online; pdf password online
172
A lack of commitment and increased 
• 
unhappiness, tension and irritability 
in parents may result in inappropriate 
responses that lead to faulty 
attachment.
3.  Children aged 3-4 years
Key concerns
Protective factors
Children are placed in physical 
• 
danger by parents whose physical 
capacity to care is limited.
Children’s cognitive development 
• 
may be delayed through lack of 
stimulation, disorganisation and 
failure to attend pre-school facilities.
Children’s attachment may be 
• 
damaged by inconsistent parenting.
Children may learn inappropriate 
• 
behavioural responses through 
witnessing domestic violence.
When parents’ behaviour is 
• 
unpredictable and frightening, 
children may display emotional 
symptoms similar to those of  
post-traumatic stress disorder.
Children may take on responsibilities 
• 
beyond their years because of 
parental incapacity.
Children may be at risk because they 
• 
are unable to tell anyone about their 
distress.
Children may have their physical 
• 
needs neglected, e.g. they may be 
unfed and unwashed; not toilet-
trained.
Children may be subjected to direct 
• 
physical violence by parents.
The presence of an alternative, 
• 
consistent caring adult who can 
respond to the cognitive and 
emotional needs of the child.
Sufficient income support and good 
• 
physical standards in the home.
Regular supportive help to the 
• 
family, including consistent day care,  
respite care, accommodation and 
family assistance.
Regular attendance at pre-school 
• 
facilities.
An alternative, safe and supportive 
• 
residence for mothers subject to 
violence and the threat of violence.
Child Protection and Welfare Practice Handbook
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Document Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages pages can be deleted from PDF file as well.
adding password to pdf file; convert password protected pdf to excel
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page
convert protected pdf to word online; pdf file password
173
4.  Children aged 5-9 years
Key concerns
Protective factors
Children may be at increased risk of 
• 
physical injury and show symptoms 
of extreme anxiety and fear.
Academic attainment is negatively 
• 
affected and children’s behaviour in 
school may become problematic.
Identity, age and gender may affect 
• 
outcomes. Boys more quickly exhibit 
problematic behaviour, but girls also 
affected if parental problems endure.
Children may develop poor  
• 
self-esteem and may blame 
themselves for their parents’ 
problems.
Inconsistent parental behaviour may 
• 
cause anxiety and faulty attachments.
Children’s fear of hostility.
• 
Unplanned separation can cause 
• 
distress and disrupt education and 
friendship patterns.
Children feel embarrassment and 
• 
shame over parents’ behaviour. As a 
consequence, they curtail friendships 
and social interaction.
Children may take on too much 
• 
responsibility for themselves, their 
parents and younger siblings.
Children may model themselves on 
• 
inappropriate role models,  
e.g. exhibit bullying behaviour.
Children have the cognitive ability 
• 
to rationalise drug and alcohol 
problems in terms of illness. This 
enables them to accept and cope 
with parents’ behaviour more easily.
The presence of an alternative, 
• 
consistent, caring adult who can 
respond to the cognitive and 
emotional needs of the children.
Sufficient income support and good 
• 
physical standards in the home.
Regular supportive help to the 
• 
family, including consistent day care, 
respite care, accommodation and 
family assistance.
Regular attendance at school.
• 
Sympathetic and vigilant teachers/
• 
school nurses.
Attendance at school health 
• 
appointments.
An alternative, safe and supportive 
• 
residence for mothers and children 
subject to violence and the threat of 
violence.
A supportive older sibling. Older 
• 
siblings can offer significant support 
to children, particularly when 
parents are overwhelmed by their 
own problems.
A friend. Children who have at 
• 
least one mutual friend have been 
shown to have higher self-worth 
and lower scores on loneliness than 
those without.
Social networks outside the family, 
• 
especially with a sympathetic adult 
of the same sex.
Belonging to organised  
• 
out-of-school activities,  
including homework clubs.
Being taught different ways of 
• 
coping and being sufficiently 
confident to know what to do when 
parents are incapacitated.
An ability to separate, either 
• 
psychologically or physically, from 
the stressful situation.
Appendix 6: Parental issues that can impact on parenting capacity
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a PDF from a supported file format, with customized options in VB.NET.
pdf password recovery; open password protected pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
copy protecting pdf files; add password to pdf document
5.  Children aged 10-14 years
Key concerns
Protective factors
Children fear being hurt.
• 
Children at increased risk of actual 
• 
injury.
Children are anxious about how to 
• 
compensate for physical neglect.
Children’s education suffers because 
• 
they find it difficult to concentrate.
School performance may be below 
• 
expected ability.
Children may miss school because 
• 
of looking after parents or siblings.
Children reject their families and 
• 
have low self-esteem.
Children are cautious of exposing 
• 
family life to outside scrutiny.
Friendships are restricted.
• 
Children fear the family may be 
• 
broken up.
Children feel isolated and have  
• 
no-one to turn to.
Children are at increased risk of 
• 
emotional disturbance and conduct 
disorders including bullying.
An increased risk of sexual abuse  
• 
in adolescent boys.
The problems of being a young carer 
• 
increase.
Children may be in denial of own 
• 
needs and feelings.
Information on how to contact 
• 
relevant professionals and a contact 
person in the event of a crisis 
regarding the parent.
Unstigmatised support from 
• 
professionals. Some children derive 
satisfaction from the caring role and 
their responsibility for and influence 
within the family. However, many 
feel their role is not sufficiently 
recognised.
An alternative, safe and supportive 
• 
residence for mothers subject to 
violence and the threat of violence.
Sufficient income support and good 
• 
physical standards in the home.
Practical and domestic help.
• 
Regular medical and dental 
• 
checks, including school health 
appointments.
Factual information about puberty, 
• 
sex and contraception.
Regular attendance at school.
• 
Sympathetic and vigilant teachers/
• 
school nurses.
Belonging to organised out-of-school 
• 
activities, including homework clubs.
A mentor or trusted adult with whom 
• 
the child is able to discuss sensitive 
issues.
An adult who assumes the role of 
• 
‘champion’ and is committed  
to the child.
A mutual friend. Research suggests 
• 
that positive features in one 
relationship can compensate for 
negative qualities in another.
The acquisition of a range of coping 
• 
strategies and being sufficiently 
confident to know what to do when 
parents are incapacitated.
An ability to separate, either 
• 
psychologically or physically, from  
the stressful situation.
174
Child Protection and Welfare Practice Handbook
175
6.  Children aged 15 and over
Key concerns
Protective factors
Teenagers have inappropriate role 
• 
models.
Teenagers are at greatest risk of 
• 
accidents.
Teenagers may have problems related 
• 
to sexual relationships.
Teenagers may fail to reach their 
• 
potential.
Teenagers are at increased risk of 
• 
school exclusion.
Poor life chances due to exclusion 
• 
and poor school attainment.
Low self-esteem as a consequence of 
• 
inconsistent parenting.
Increased isolation from both friends 
• 
and adults outside the family.
Teenagers may use aggression 
• 
inappropriately to solve problems.
Emotional problems may result from 
• 
self-blame and guilt, and lead to 
increased risk of suicidal behaviour 
and vulnerability to crime.
Teenagers’ own needs may be 
• 
sacrificed to meet the needs of their 
parents.
Sufficient income support and good 
• 
physical standards in the home.
Practical and domestic help.
• 
Regular medical and dental checks.
• 
Factual information about sex and 
• 
contraception.
Regular attendance at school or a 
• 
form of further education.
Sympathetic, empathetic and vigilant 
• 
teachers/school nurses.
For those no longer in full-time 
• 
education, a job.
A trusted adult with whom the child is 
• 
able to discuss sensitive issues.
An adult who assumes the role of 
• 
‘champion’ and is committed to the 
child.
A mutual friend. Research suggests 
• 
that positive features in one 
relationship can compensate for 
negative qualities in another.
An ability to separate, either 
• 
psychologically or physically, from the 
stressful situation.
Information on how to contact 
• 
relevant professionals and a contact 
person in the event of a crisis 
regarding the parent.
Unstigmatised support from relevant 
• 
professionals who recognise their role 
as a young carer.
An alternative, safe and supportive 
• 
residence for young people subject to 
violence and the threat of violence.
Source: NESCPC (2011)
Appendix 6: Parental issues that can impact on parenting capacity
Index
Index
A
abuse
categories of, 10–14
emotional abuse, 10
extra-familial abuse, 55, 57, 146
financial abuse, 67
intra-familial abuse, 57, 146
physical abuse, 12–13
psychological/emotional abuse, 67
responding to child’s disclosure of, 
32–33
retrospective disclosures by adults, 
58, 146
sexual abuse, 10–11
See also neglect
access of alleged abuser to children, 146
Access Workers (HSE), 26
adolescents
relationship violence, 67
risk factors in, 60
adult services and impact on children, 29
adults disclosing abuse in childhood. See 
retrospective disclosures by adults
Advocacy Workers (HSE), 26
Advocacy, Director of (HSE), 129
age of child
as risk factor in child protection, 60
issues impacting on parenting 
capacity, 171–75
alcohol
children and families in Ireland 
affected by (2008), 72
exposure of newborn child to, 19
parental misuse of, 71–73
allegations against workers and 
volunteers, managing, 129
animals, cruelty to, 108–9
anonymous referrals, 36
anti-social personality disorder, 69
Asian women and domestic violence, 72
assessment practice
child attachment to parents/carers, 
103–5
chronologies, 6, 117–19
core assessment, 4
cruelty to animals, 108–9
disabled children, 79–80
domestic violence, 64–66
evaluating progress, 113
fathers/male partners, 111–12
further assessment, 4, 47
home visits, 105–8
initial assessment, 4, 37, 45–46
intellectual disability in children, 
79–80
intellectual disability in parents/carers, 
75–76
interviewing children, 46
interviewing third parties, 37
key considerations, warnings, pitfalls 
in assessments, 93–102
male partners, unknown, 81–82
mental health of parents/carers, 70
parenting capacity, 75–76, 109–13, 
171–75
perpetrator risk assessment, 66
recommendations from Serious 
Case Inquiries (Ireland), 95, 
160–63
record-keeping and file 
management, 116
risk assessment, 4
supervising assessments, 113–16
types of assessment, 4
uncooperative or ‘hard to engage’ 
families, 82–85
attachment of children to parents/carers, 
103–5
B
‘Baby Peter’, Serious Case Review, ‘Child 
A’ (2010), 81–82
behaviour of child, questions on, 31
best practice in child protection and 
welfare work, principles of, 3–4
black and minority ethnic (BME) 
communities, 62, 87–88
177
C
care
children in care of State, 119, 150
children in private foster care, 120
children in voluntary care, 147
Care Assistants (HSE), 26
Care Order, 120, 148–49
care proceedings by HSE under Child 
Care Act 1991, 148–49
caregivers, inappropriate, 18
case conference. See Child Protection 
Conference
Child Care Act 1991
Care proceedings, 148–49
children in care of State, 119, 150
definition of ‘child’, 4
foster care, 120
safety and welfare of child is 
paramount, 40, 146
Section 12 (Powers of An Garda 
Síochána to take a child to safety), 
55, 147
Section 13 (Emergency Care Order), 
55, 120, 148
Section 3 (Functions of HSE), 57, 
145–46
Section 4 (Voluntary care), 147
Section 43A, 147
Section 45, 121
Child Care Amendment Act 2011, 151
Child Care Manager, HSE Children and 
Family Services, 7, 25, 26, 53–54
Child Care Regulations 1995, 119, 147
Child Care Training Departments, 128
child-centred service, viii
‘child’, definition of, 4
See also newborn child; unborn 
child
child development, checklist for  
(0-5 years), 165–70
Child-minder Coordinators (HSE), 26
child protection and welfare
child protection response, 47
child welfare response, 47
definition of concerns about, 5, 6
principles of best practice in, 3–4
process overview, 44–58
risk factors in, 59–88
See also assessment practice; 
Children and Family Services, 
HSE; concerns; referrals
Child Protection Conference, 5, 39, 
48–51, 53
recommendations from Serious 
Case Inquiries (Ireland), 50–51
Child Protection Notification System 
(CPNS), 5, 53–54
Child Protection Plan, 5, 51–52, 54
Child Protection Review Conference, 5, 54
child trafficking, 89–90
Children Act 2001, 151
Part 3, 120
Parts 2, 3 and 8, 57
Children and Family Services, HSE
Child Protection Notification System 
(CPNS), 5, 53–54
children in care of State, 119, 150
death of child due to abuse/neglect, 
responding to, 121
delivery of child into custody by  
An Garda Síochána, 55, 147
Designated Officers, 6, 26–28
designated persons, 7, 25–26, 53–54
Duty Social Worker (team), 8, 27, 37, 
38, 44
foster care arrangements, 120
joint HSE/Garda action, 54–56
joint specialist interviewing with  
An Garda Síochána, 46
management structures in, 7, 25
national offices and contact 
information, 132–37
notification of abuse/neglect to  
An Garda Síochána, 55
Principal Social Worker, 47, 129
Reference Group for development 
of HSE Child Protection and 
Welfare Practice Handbook, ix
Serious Incidents, management of, 
120–21
Workforce Development, Education, 
Training and Research (WDETR), 
128
See also Health Service Executive
178
Child Protection and Welfare Practice Handbook
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested