>>> a_list = ['The', 'sixth', 'sick', "sheik's", 'sixth', "sheep's", 'sick']
>>> set(a_list)
{'sixth', 'The', "sheep's", 'sick', "sheik's"}
>>> a_string = 'EAST IS EAST'
>>> set(a_string)
{'A', ' ', 'E', 'I', 'S', 'T'}
>>> words = ['SEND', 'MORE', 'MONEY']
>>> ''.join(words)
'SENDMOREMONEY'
>>> set(''.join(words))
{'E', 'D', 'M', 'O', 'N', 'S', 'R', 'Y'}
1. Given a list of several strings, the
set()
function will return a set of unique strings from the list. This makes
sense if you think of it like a
for
loop. Takethefirst item from the list, put it in the set. Second. Third.
Fourth. Fifth—wait, that’s in theset already, soit only gets listed once, becausePython sets don’t allow
duplicates. Sixth. Seventh—again, a duplicate, so it only gets listed once. Theend result? All theunique
items in the original list, without any duplicates. The original list doesn’t even need to be sorted first.
2. Thesametechnique works with strings, since a string is just asequence of characters.
3. Given a list of strings,
''.join(a_list)
concatenates all the strings together into one.
4. So, given a list of strings, this line of codereturns all the uniquecharacters across all the strings, with no
duplicates.
Thealphametics solver uses this techniqueto build a set of all the unique characters in the puzzle.
unique_characters = set(''.join(words))
This list is later used to assign digits to characters as thesolver iterates through thepossible solutions.
191
Pdf password - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
add password to pdf document; adding a password to a pdf using reader
Pdf password - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
create password protected pdf; adding a password to a pdf
8.4.M
AKING ASSERTIONS
Like many programming languages, Python has an
assert
statement. Here’s how it works.
>>> assert 1 + 1 == 2
>>> assert 1 + 1 == 3
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError
>>> assert 2 + 2 == 5, "Only for very large values of 2"
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError: Only for very large values of 2
1. The
assert
statement is followed by any valid Python expression. In this case, theexpression
1 + 1 == 2
evaluates to
True
,so the
assert
statement does nothing.
2. However, if the Python expression evaluates to
False
,the
assert
statement will raisean
AssertionError
.
3. You can also include a human-readable message that is printed if the
AssertionError
is raised.
Therefore, this lineof code:
assert len(unique_characters) <= 10, 'Too many letters'
…is equivalent tothis:
if len(unique_characters) > 10:
raise AssertionError('Too many letters')
Thealphametics solver uses this exact
assert
statement to bail out early if the puzzle contains more than
ten uniqueletters. Sinceeach letter is assigned a unique digit, and there are only ten digits, a puzzle with
more than ten unique letters can not possibly have asolution.
192
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Online Remove Password from Protected PDF file. Download Free Trial. Remove password from protected PDF file. Find your password-protected PDF and upload it.
convert protected pdf to word document; pdf password
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
add password to pdf reader; break password on pdf
8.5. G
ENERATOR EXPRESSIONS
Agenerator expression is like a
generator function without the function.
>>> unique_characters = {'E', 'D', 'M', 'O', 'N', 'S', 'R', 'Y'}
>>> gen = (ord(c) for c in unique_characters)
>>> gen
<generator object <genexpr> at 0x00BADC10>
>>> next(gen)
69
>>> next(gen)
68
>>> tuple(ord(c) for c in unique_characters)
(69, 68, 77, 79, 78, 83, 82, 89)
1. A generator expression is like an anonymous function that yields values. Theexpression itself looks likea
list
comprehension, but it’s wrapped in parentheses instead of squarebrackets.
2. Thegenerator expression returns… an iterator.
3. Calling
next(gen)
returns thenext value from the iterator.
4. If you like, you can iteratethrough all the possiblevalues and return a tuple, list, or set, by passing the
generator expression to
tuple()
,
list()
,or
set()
.In these cases, you don’t need an extra set of
parentheses—just pass the “bare”expression
ord(c) for c in unique_characters
to the
tuple()
function,
and Python figures out that it’s a generator expression.
Using a generator expression instead of alist comprehension can save both
CPU
and
RAM
.If you’re building an list just to throw it away (e.g. passing it to
tuple()
or
set()
), usea generator expression instead!
Here’s another way to accomplish the same thing, using a
generator function:
193
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
create password protected pdf from word; convert password protected pdf to excel online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
Support to add password to PDF document and edit password on PDF file. More details are given on this page. C#.NET: Edit PDF Password in ASP.NET.
pdf passwords; convert protected pdf to word
def ord_map(a_string):
for c in a_string:
yield ord(c)
gen = ord_map(unique_characters)
Thegenerator expression is more compact but functionally equivalent.
8.6.C
ALCULATING
P
ERMUTATIONS
…T
HE
L
AZY
W
AY
!
First of all, what the heckare permutations? Permutations are a mathematical concept. (There areactually
several definitions, dependingon what kind of math you’re doing. HereI’m talking about combinatorics, but if
that doesn’t mean anything to you, don’t worry about it. As always,
Wikipedia is your friend.)
Theidea is that you takea list of things (could be numbers, could be letters, could be dancing bears) and
find all the possible ways to split them up into smaller lists. All thesmaller lists have the same size, which
can be as small as 1 and as largeas thetotal number of items. Oh, and nothing can be repeated.
Mathematicians say things like “let’s find the permutations of 3 different items taken 2 at a time,” which
means you havea sequence of 3 items and you want to find all the possible ordered pairs.
194
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
WinFoms project. Support protecting PDF file by adding password and digital signatures with C# sample code in .NET Class. Feel free
pdf open password; convert protected pdf to word online
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
program. Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of
advanced pdf password remover; pdf password recovery
>>> import itertools
>>> perms = itertools.permutations([1, 2, 3], 2)
>>> next(perms)
(1, 2)
>>> next(perms)
(1, 3)
>>> next(perms)
(2, 1)
>>> next(perms)
(2, 3)
>>> next(perms)
(3, 1)
>>> next(perms)
(3, 2)
>>> next(perms)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration
1. The
itertools
module has all kinds of fun stuff in it, including a
permutations()
function that does all the
hard work of finding permutations.
2. The
permutations()
function takes a sequence (herea list of three integers) and a number, which is the
number of items you want in each smaller group. Thefunction returns an iterator, which you can use in a
for
loop or any old place that iterates. Here I’ll step through theiterator manually to show all thevalues.
3. Thefirst permutation of
[1, 2, 3]
taken 2 at atimeis
(1, 2)
.
4. Notethat permutations are ordered:
(2, 1)
is different than
(1, 2)
.
5. That’s it! Those are all the permutations of
[1, 2, 3]
taken 2 at a time. Pairs like
(1, 1)
and
(2, 2)
never
show up, becausethey contain repeats so they aren’t valid permutations. When there are no more
permutations, the iterator raises a
StopIteration
exception.
195
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Able to convert password protected PDF document
reader save pdf with password; pdf protection remover
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
add password to pdf file with reader; creating password protected pdf
The
itertools
module has
all kinds of
fun stuff.
The
permutations()
function doesn’t have to take a list.
It can take any sequence—even a string.
>>> import itertools
>>> perms = itertools.permutations('ABC', 3)
>>> next(perms)
('A', 'B', 'C')
>>> next(perms)
('A', 'C', 'B')
>>> next(perms)
('B', 'A', 'C')
>>> next(perms)
('B', 'C', 'A')
>>> next(perms)
('C', 'A', 'B')
>>> next(perms)
('C', 'B', 'A')
>>> next(perms)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration
>>> list(itertools.permutations('ABC', 3))
[('A', 'B', 'C'), ('A', 'C', 'B'),
('B', 'A', 'C'), ('B', 'C', 'A'),
('C', 'A', 'B'), ('C', 'B', 'A')]
1. A string is just a sequence of characters. For thepurposes of finding permutations, thestring
'ABC'
is
equivalent to the list
['A', 'B', 'C']
.
2. Thefirst permutation of the 3 items
['A', 'B', 'C']
,taken 3 at a time, is
('A', 'B', 'C')
.There are five
other permutations—thesamethree characters in every conceivableorder.
3. Since the
permutations()
function always returns an iterator, an easy way todebug permutations is topass
that iterator to the built-in
list()
function to see all thepermutations immediately.
196
8.7. O
THER
F
UN
S
TUFFIN THE
itertools M
ODULE
>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.product('ABC', '123'))
[('A', '1'), ('A', '2'), ('A', '3'),
('B', '1'), ('B', '2'), ('B', '3'),
('C', '1'), ('C', '2'), ('C', '3')]
>>> list(itertools.combinations('ABC', 2))
[('A', 'B'), ('A', 'C'), ('B', 'C')]
1. The
itertools.product()
function returns an iterator containing theCartesian product of two sequences.
2. The
itertools.combinations()
function returns an iterator containing all the possible combinations of the
given sequenceof the given length. This is like the
itertools.permutations()
function, except combinations
don’t include items that are duplicates of other items in a different order. So
itertools.permutations('ABC', 2)
will return both
('A', 'B')
and
('B', 'A')
(among others), but
itertools.combinations('ABC', 2)
will not return
('B', 'A')
becauseit is a duplicate of
('A', 'B')
in a
different order.
197
>>> names = list(open('examples/favorite-people.txt', encoding='utf-8'))
>>> names
['Dora\n', 'Ethan\n', 'Wesley\n', 'John\n', 'Anne\n',
'Mike\n', 'Chris\n', 'Sarah\n', 'Alex\n', 'Lizzie\n']
>>> names = [name.rstrip() for name in names]
>>> names
['Dora', 'Ethan', 'Wesley', 'John', 'Anne',
'Mike', 'Chris', 'Sarah', 'Alex', 'Lizzie']
>>> names = sorted(names)
>>> names
['Alex', 'Anne', 'Chris', 'Dora', 'Ethan',
'John', 'Lizzie', 'Mike', 'Sarah', 'Wesley']
>>> names = sorted(names, key=len)
>>> names
['Alex', 'Anne', 'Dora', 'John', 'Mike',
'Chris', 'Ethan', 'Sarah', 'Lizzie', 'Wesley']
1. This idiom returns alist of the lines in a text file.
2. Unfortunately (for this example), the
list(open(filename))
idiom also includes the carriage returns at the
end of each line. This list comprehension uses the
rstrip()
string method to strip trailing whitespacefrom
each line. (Strings also havean
lstrip()
method to strip leadingwhitespace, and a
strip()
method which
strips both.)
3. The
sorted()
function takes a list and returns it sorted. By default, it sorts alphabetically.
4. But the
sorted()
function can also take afunction as the
key
parameter, and it sorts by that key. In this
case, thesort function is
len()
,so it sorts by
len(each item)
.Shorter names comefirst, then longer, then
longest.
What does this haveto do with the
itertools
module? I’m glad you asked.
198
…continuing from the previous interactive shell…
>>> import itertools
>>> groups = itertools.groupby(names, len)
>>> groups
<itertools.groupby object at 0x00BB20C0>
>>> list(groups)
[(4, <itertools._grouper object at 0x00BA8BF0>),
(5, <itertools._grouper object at 0x00BB4050>),
(6, <itertools._grouper object at 0x00BB4030>)]
>>> groups = itertools.groupby(names, len)
>>> for name_length, name_iter in groups:
...
print('Names with {0:d} letters:'.format(name_length))
...
for name in name_iter:
...
print(name)
...
Names with 4 letters:
Alex
Anne
Dora
John
Mike
Names with 5 letters:
Chris
Ethan
Sarah
Names with 6 letters:
Lizzie
Wesley
1. The
itertools.groupby()
function takes a sequence and a key function, and returns an iterator that
generates pairs. Each pair contains theresult of
key_function(each item)
and another iterator containing all
the items that shared that key result.
2. Calling the
list()
function “exhausted” the iterator, i.e. you’ve already generated every item in the iterator
to make the list. There’s no “reset” button on an iterator; you can’t just start over once you’ve exhausted
199
it. If you want to loop through it again (say, in the upcoming
for
loop), you need to call
itertools.groupby()
again to createa new iterator.
3. In this example, given a list of names already sorted by length,
itertools.groupby(names, len)
will put all the
4-letter names in one iterator, all the 5-letter names in another iterator, and so on. The
groupby()
function
is completely generic;it could group strings by first letter, numbers by their number of factors, or any other
key function you can thinkof.
The
itertools.groupby()
function only works if the input sequence is already sorted
by the grouping function. In the example above, you grouped a list of names by the
len()
function. That only worked because the input list was already sorted by length.
Are you watching closely?
>>> list(range(0, 3))
[0, 1, 2]
>>> list(range(10, 13))
[10, 11, 12]
>>> list(itertools.chain(range(0, 3), range(10, 13)))
[0, 1, 2, 10, 11, 12]
>>> list(zip(range(0, 3), range(10, 13)))
[(0, 10), (1, 11), (2, 12)]
>>> list(zip(range(0, 3), range(10, 14)))
[(0, 10), (1, 11), (2, 12)]
>>> list(itertools.zip_longest(range(0, 3), range(10, 14)))
[(0, 10), (1, 11), (2, 12), (None, 13)]
1. The
itertools.chain()
function takes two iterators and returns an iterator that contains all the items from
the first iterator, followed by all the items from the second iterator. (Actually, it can take any number of
iterators, and it chains them all in the order they were passed to the function.)
2. The
zip()
function does something prosaic that turns out to be extremely useful: it takes any number of
sequences and returns an iterator which returns tuples of the first items of each sequence, then thesecond
items of each, then the third, and so on.
200
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested