numeral = roman8.to_roman(integer)
result = roman8.from_roman(numeral)
self.assertEqual(integer, result)
1. Theexistingknown values don’t change (they’re all still reasonablevalues to test), but you need to add a
few morein the
4000
range. Here I’ve included
4000
(the shortest),
4500
(the second shortest),
4888
(the
longest), and
4999
(the largest).
2. Thedefinition of “large input” has changed. This test used to call
to_roman()
with
4000
and expect an error;
now that
4000-4999
are good values, you need to bump this up to
5000
.
3. Thedefinition of “too many repeated numerals” has also changed. This test used to call
from_roman()
with
'MMMM'
and expect an error; now that
MMMM
is considered a valid Roman numeral, you need to bump this up
to
'MMMMM'
.
4. Thesanity check loops through every number in the range, from
1
to
3999
.Since the range has now
expanded, this
for
loop need to be updated as well togo up to
4999
.
Now your test cases areup to date with the new requirements, but your code is not, so you expect several
of the test cases tofail.
251
Pdf password encryption - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
create password protected pdf reader; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
Pdf password encryption - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
password protected pdf; add password to pdf preview
you@localhost:~/diveintopython3/examples$ python3 romantest9.py -v
from_roman should fail with blank string ... ok
from_roman should fail with malformed antecedents ... ok
from_roman should fail with non-string input ... ok
from_roman should fail with repeated pairs of numerals ... ok
from_roman should fail with too many repeated numerals ... ok
from_roman should give known result with known input ... ERROR
to_roman should give known result with known input ... ERROR
from_roman(to_roman(n))==n for all n ... ERROR
to_roman should fail with negative input ... ok
to_roman should fail with non-integer input ... ok
to_roman should fail with large input ... ok
to_roman should fail with 0 input ... ok
======================================================================
ERROR: from_roman should give known result with known input
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "romantest9.py", line 82, in test_from_roman_known_values
result = roman9.from_roman(numeral)
File "C:\home\diveintopython3\examples\roman9.py", line 60, in from_roman
raise InvalidRomanNumeralError('Invalid Roman numeral: {0}'.format(s))
roman9.InvalidRomanNumeralError: Invalid Roman numeral: MMMM
======================================================================
ERROR: to_roman should give known result with known input
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "romantest9.py", line 76, in test_to_roman_known_values
result = roman9.to_roman(integer)
File "C:\home\diveintopython3\examples\roman9.py", line 42, in to_roman
raise OutOfRangeError('number out of range (must be 0..3999)')
roman9.OutOfRangeError: number out of range (must be 0..3999)
252
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Find your password-protected PDF and upload it. If there is no strong encryption on your file, it will be unlocked and ready to download within seconds.
add password to pdf file with reader; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a setting object with user password "Hello World". Hello World"); // Set encryption level to
break pdf password online; pdf protected mode
======================================================================
ERROR: from_roman(to_roman(n))==n for all n
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "romantest9.py", line 131, in testSanity
numeral = roman9.to_roman(integer)
File "C:\home\diveintopython3\examples\roman9.py", line 42, in to_roman
raise OutOfRangeError('number out of range (must be 0..3999)')
roman9.OutOfRangeError: number out of range (must be 0..3999)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 12 tests in 0.171s
FAILED (errors=3)
1. The
from_roman()
known values test will fail as soon as it hits
'MMMM'
,because
from_roman()
still thinks this
is an invalid Roman numeral.
2. The
to_roman()
known values test will fail as soon as it hits
4000
,because
to_roman()
still thinks this is out
of range.
3. Theroundtrip checkwill also fail as soon as it hits
4000
,because
to_roman()
still thinks this is out of range.
Now that you have test cases that fail dueto the new requirements, you can think about fixing the codeto
bring it in line with thetest cases. (When you first start coding unit tests, it might feel strangethat the code
being tested is never “ahead” of the test cases. While it’s behind, you still have some work to do, and as
soon as it catches up to the test cases, you stop coding. After you get used to it, you’ll wonder how you
ever programmed without tests.)
253
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password setting object with user password "Hello World Hello World") ' Set encryption level to
create password protected pdf online; add password to pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
NET class. Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Support PDF encryption in VB.NET class applications. A professional
pdf password online; copy protection pdf
roman_numeral_pattern = re.compile('''
                  # beginning of string
M{0,4}              # thousands - 0 to 4 Ms
(CM|CD|D?C{0,3})    # hundreds - 900 (CM), 400 (CD), 0-300 (0 to 3 Cs),
           or 500-800 (D, followed by 0 to 3 Cs)
(XC|XL|L?X{0,3})    # tens - 90 (XC), 40 (XL), 0-30 (0 to 3 Xs),
       or 50-80 (L, followed by 0 to 3 Xs)
(IX|IV|V?I{0,3})    # ones - 9 (IX), 4 (IV), 0-3 (0 to 3 Is),
       or 5-8 (V, followed by 0 to 3 Is)
                  # end of string
''', re.VERBOSE)
def to_roman(n):
'''convert integer to Roman numeral'''
if not (0 < n < 5000):
raise OutOfRangeError('number out of range (must be 1..4999)')
if not isinstance(n, int):
raise NotIntegerError('non-integers can not be converted')
result = ''
for numeral, integer in roman_numeral_map:
while n >= integer:
result += numeral
n -= integer
return result
def from_roman(s):
.
.
.
1. You don’t need to make any changes to the
from_roman()
function at all. The only change is to
roman_numeral_pattern
.If you lookclosely, you’ll noticethat I changed themaximum number of optional
M
characters from
3
to
4
in the first section of theregular expression. This will allow the Roman numeral
254
VB.NET Word: How to Convert Word Document to PNG Image Format in
and document formats, including converting Word to PDF in VB protection by utilizing the modern Advanced Encryption Standard that converts a password to a
add password to pdf document; add password to pdf
C# Image: How to Annotate Image with Freehand Line in .NET Project
Tutorials on how to add freehand line objects to PDF, Word and TIFF SDK; Protect sensitive image information with redaction and encryption annotation objects;
break pdf password; add password to pdf without acrobat
equivalents of
4999
instead of
3999
.The actual
from_roman()
function is completely generic;it just looks for
repeated Roman numeral characters and adds them up, without caring how many times they repeat. The
only reason it didn’t handle
'MMMM'
before is that you explicitly stopped it with theregular expression
pattern matching.
2. The
to_roman()
function only needs one small change, in the range check. Where you used to check
0 < n <
4000
,you now check
0 < n < 5000
.And you change theerror messagethat you
raise
to reflect thenew
acceptable range (
1..4999
instead of
1..3999
). You don’t need to makeany changes to the rest of the
function;it handles the new cases already. (It merrily adds
'M'
for each thousand that it finds;given
4000
,it
will spit out
'MMMM'
.Theonly reason it didn’t do this before is that you explicitly stopped it with therange
check.)
You may beskeptical that these two small changes are all that you need. Hey, don’t take my word for it;
see for yourself.
you@localhost:~/diveintopython3/examples$ python3 romantest9.py -v
from_roman should fail with blank string ... ok
from_roman should fail with malformed antecedents ... ok
from_roman should fail with non-string input ... ok
from_roman should fail with repeated pairs of numerals ... ok
from_roman should fail with too many repeated numerals ... ok
from_roman should give known result with known input ... ok
to_roman should give known result with known input ... ok
from_roman(to_roman(n))==n for all n ... ok
to_roman should fail with negative input ... ok
to_roman should fail with non-integer input ... ok
to_roman should fail with large input ... ok
to_roman should fail with 0 input ... ok
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 12 tests in 0.203s
OK
1. All the test cases pass. Stop coding.
255
C# Image: C#.NET Code to Add HotSpot Annotation on Images
Protect sensitive information with powerful redaction and encryption annotation objects to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reader save pdf with password; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online
C# Image: Add Watermark to Images Within RasterEdge .NET Imaging
powerful and reliable color reduction products, image encryption decryption, and even to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
password protected pdf; add password to pdf reader
Comprehensive unit testing means never having torely on a programmer who says “Trust me.”
10.3. R
EFACTORING
Thebest thing about comprehensive unit testing is not thefeelingyou get when all your test cases finally
pass, or even thefeeling you get when someone else blames you for breaking their code and you can
actually prove that you didn’t. The best thing about unit testing is that it gives you the freedom to refactor
mercilessly.
Refactoring is the process of taking working codeand making it work better. Usually, “better” means
“faster”, although it can also mean “using less memory”, or “using less diskspace”, or simply “more
elegantly”. Whatever it means toyou, to your project, in your environment, refactoring is important to the
long-term health of any program.
Here, “better” means both “faster” and “easier tomaintain.” Specifically, the
from_roman()
function is slower
and more complex than I’d like, because of that big nasty regular expression that you use to validate Roman
numerals. Now, you might think, “Sure, theregular expression is bigand hairy, but how else am I supposed
to validate that an arbitrary string is a valid a Roman numeral?”
Answer: there’s only 5000 of them; why don’t you just build a lookup table? This idea gets even better when
you realize that you don’t need to use regular expressions at all. As you build the lookup table for converting
integers to Roman numerals, you can build the reverse lookup table to convert Roman numerals to integers.
By the time you need to check whether an arbitrary string is a valid Roman numeral, you will have collected
all the valid Roman numerals. “Validating” is reduced to a singledictionary lookup.
And best of all, you already have a completeset of unit tests. You can changeover half the codein the
module, but theunit tests will stay thesame. That means you can prove—to yourself and toothers—that
the new code works just as well as the original.
256
class OutOfRangeError(ValueError): pass
class NotIntegerError(ValueError): pass
class InvalidRomanNumeralError(ValueError): pass
roman_numeral_map = (('M',  1000),
('CM', 900),
('D',  500),
('CD', 400),
('C',  100),
('XC', 90),
('L',  50),
('XL', 40),
('X',  10),
('IX', 9),
('V',  5),
('IV', 4),
('I',  1))
to_roman_table = [ None ]
from_roman_table = {}
def to_roman(n):
'''convert integer to Roman numeral'''
if not (0 < n < 5000):
raise OutOfRangeError('number out of range (must be 1..4999)')
if int(n) != n:
raise NotIntegerError('non-integers can not be converted')
return to_roman_table[n]
def from_roman(s):
'''convert Roman numeral to integer'''
if not isinstance(s, str):
raise InvalidRomanNumeralError('Input must be a string')
if not s:
257
raise InvalidRomanNumeralError('Input can not be blank')
if s not in from_roman_table:
raise InvalidRomanNumeralError('Invalid Roman numeral: {0}'.format(s))
return from_roman_table[s]
def build_lookup_tables():
def to_roman(n):
result = ''
for numeral, integer in roman_numeral_map:
if n >= integer:
result = numeral
n -= integer
break
if n > 0:
result += to_roman_table[n]
return result
for integer in range(1, 5000):
roman_numeral = to_roman(integer)
to_roman_table.append(roman_numeral)
from_roman_table[roman_numeral] = integer
build_lookup_tables()
Let’s break that down into digestable pieces. Arguably, the most important line is the last one:
build_lookup_tables()
You will notethat is a function call, but there’s no
if
statement around it. This is not an
if __name__ ==
'__main__'
block; it gets called when the module isimported. (It is important to understand that modules are
only imported once, then cached. If you import an already-imported module, it does nothing. So this code
will only get called the first timeyou import this module.)
So what does the
build_lookup_tables()
function do? I’m glad you asked.
258
to_roman_table = [ None ]
from_roman_table = {}
.
.
.
def build_lookup_tables():
def to_roman(n):
result = ''
for numeral, integer in roman_numeral_map:
if n >= integer:
result = numeral
n -= integer
break
if n > 0:
result += to_roman_table[n]
return result
for integer in range(1, 5000):
roman_numeral = to_roman(integer)
to_roman_table.append(roman_numeral)
from_roman_table[roman_numeral] = integer
1. This is a clever bit of programming… perhaps too clever. The
to_roman()
function is defined above;it looks
up values in the lookup table and returns them. But the
build_lookup_tables()
function redefines the
to_roman()
function to actually do work (liketheprevious examples did, before you added a lookup table).
Within the
build_lookup_tables()
function, calling
to_roman()
will call this redefined version. Once the
build_lookup_tables()
function exits, the redefined version disappears—it is only defined in the local scope
of the
build_lookup_tables()
function.
2. This line of code will call the redefined
to_roman()
function, which actually calculates the Roman numeral.
3. Once you havetheresult (from the redefined
to_roman()
function), you add the integer and its Roman
numeral equivalent toboth lookup tables.
Once the lookup tables are built, the rest of the codeis both easy and fast.
259
def to_roman(n):
'''convert integer to Roman numeral'''
if not (0 < n < 5000):
raise OutOfRangeError('number out of range (must be 1..4999)')
if int(n) != n:
raise NotIntegerError('non-integers can not be converted')
return to_roman_table[n]
def from_roman(s):
'''convert Roman numeral to integer'''
if not isinstance(s, str):
raise InvalidRomanNumeralError('Input must be a string')
if not s:
raise InvalidRomanNumeralError('Input can not be blank')
if s not in from_roman_table:
raise InvalidRomanNumeralError('Invalid Roman numeral: {0}'.format(s))
return from_roman_table[s]
1. After doingthesamebounds checking as before, the
to_roman()
function simply finds the appropriate value
in the lookup table and returns it.
2. Similarly, the
from_roman()
function is reduced to some bounds checking and one lineof code. No more
regular expressions. No more looping. O(1) conversion to and from Roman numerals.
But does it work? Why yes, yes it does. And I can prove it.
260
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested