c# convert pdf to image without ghostscript : Add password to pdf online control SDK platform web page wpf html web browser dotnet%20tutorial%20for%20beginners3-part713

Like the C runtime, the CLI has been designed to exploit the power of diverse 
platforms, as well as to complement existing tools, languages, and runtimes. Let's 
look at a few of the likely ways that the Shared Source CLI Implementation might 
interest you: 
• 
There are significant differences in implementation between this code and the 
code for Microsoft's commercial CLR implementation, both to facilitate portability 
and to make the code base more approachable. If you are a developer who is 
interested in knowing how JIT compilers and garbage collectors work, or of how 
Microsoft Visual Studio works on your behalf under the covers, this distribution 
will definitely hold your attention!  
• 
The distribution will help you in creating courseware around interesting topics 
that can be illustrated by this codebase. 
• 
The distribution will help you in implementing your own version of the CLI and it 
also helps you in understanding the way the compilers and tools target the CLI. 
Automatic Memory Management
Now let us discuss about an important feature of the CLR called Automatic Memory 
Management. A major feature of .NET framework CLR is that the runtime 
automatically handles the allocation and release of an object’s memory resources. 
Automatic memory management enhances code quality and developer productivity 
without negatively impacting expressiveness or performance. 
The Garbage Collector (GC) is responsible for collecting the objects no longer 
referenced by the application. The GC may automatically be invoked by the CLR or 
the application may explicitly invoke the GC by calling GC.Collect. Objects are not 
released from memory until the GC is invoked and setting an object reference to 
Nothing does not invoke the GC, a period of time often elapses between when the 
object is no longer referenced by the application and when the GC collects it. 
Common Type System
The Common Type System defines how data types are declared, used, and managed 
in the runtime, and is also an important part of the runtime’s support for the Cross-
Language Integration. The common type system performs the following functions:  
• 
Establishes a framework that enables cross-language integration, type safety, 
and high performance code execution.  
• 
Provides an object-oriented model that supports the complete implementation of 
many programming languages.  
• 
Defines rules that languages must follow, which helps ensure that objects written 
in different languages can interact with each other.  
The Common Type System can be divided into two general categories of types,  
Reference type and Value type each of which is further divided into subcategories. 
Common Type System Architecture
Add password to pdf online - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf user password; break a pdf password
Add password to pdf online - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf passwords; copy protection pdf
The .NET type system has two different kinds of types namely Value types and 
Reference types. 
Value types directly contain the data, and instances of value types are either 
allocated on the stack or allocated inline in a structure. Value types can be built-in 
(implemented by the runtime), user-defined, or enumerations.  
The core value types supported by the .NET platform reside within the root of the 
System namespace. There types are often referred to as the .NET “Primitive Types”.  
They include: 
• 
Boolean 
• 
Byte 
• 
Char 
• 
DateTime 
• 
Decimal 
• 
Double 
• 
Guid 
• 
Int16 
• 
Int32 
• 
Int64 
• 
SByte 
• 
Single 
• 
Timespan 
Reference types store a reference to the value's memory address, and are 
allocated on the heap. Reference types can be self-describing types, pointer types, or 
interface types. The type of a reference type can be determined from values of self-
describing types. Self-describing types are further split into arrays and class types. 
Value Type vs. Reference Type
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Access to freeware download and online VB.NET to provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
copy protected pdf to word converter online; create pdf password
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
convert pdf password protected to word online; convert password protected pdf to word online
The primary difference between reference and value types is how instances of the 
two types are treated by the CLR. One difference is that the GC collects instances of 
reference types that are no longer referenced by the application. Instances of value 
types are automatically cleaned up when the variable goes out of scope. Let’s take a 
look at an example in VB.NET: 
Another difference is when one variable is set equal to another or passed as a 
parameter to a method call. When a variable of a reference type (A) is set equal to 
another variable of the same type (B), variable A is assigned a reference to B. Both 
variables reference the same object. When a variable of value type (A) is set equal 
to another variable of the same type (B), variable A receives a copy of the contents 
of B. Each variable will have its own individual copy of the data. 
Yet another difference between the behaviors of value types versus reference types 
is how equality is determined. Two variables of a given reference type are 
determined to be equal if both the variables refer to the same object. Two variables 
of a given value type are determined to be equal if the state of the two variables are 
equal. 
The final difference between the two is the way the instances of a type are initialized. 
In a reference type, the variable is initialized with a default value of Null. The 
variable will not reference an object until explicitly done by the object. Whereas a 
variable declared as a value type will always reference a valid object. 
Custom Types
A Custom Type is a set of data and related behavior that is defined by the developer. 
A developer can define both custom reference type and custom value types. 
In vb.net we can define custom types by using the Structure keyword. Let’s look at 
an example wherein we define a custom value type. 
Sub Test() 
Dim myInteger as Integer 
Dim myObject as Object 
End Sub 
‘myInteger a Value type is automatically cleaned up when the Sub ends. 
‘But myObject a Reference type is not cleaned up until the GC is run. 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields;
pdf password remover online; convert password protected pdf to excel online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields;
create password protected pdf online; pdf password protect
We declare a structure by name Test, it signals vb.net compiler to have Test 
derive from System.ValueType and therefore a value type. In the Main() we initialize  
x and then set y equal to x. Since x and y are both instances of value types, y is set 
equal to the value of x. After changing the fields in y write the value of the fields in 
both x and y to the Console. The output of the program is: 
x: myInt = 4 and myString = Test 
y: myInt = 1 and myString = Changed 
Notice that even after changing the value of fields in y it did not affect x. This is 
exactly the behavior required for primitive types. 
Boxing and Unboxing Value Types
Sometimes it is required to treat an instance of a value type as if it were an instance 
of a reference type. An example of this is when a value type is passed ByRef as a 
parameter of a method. This is where the concept of Boxing becomes important. 
Boxing occurs when an instance of a value type is converted to a reference type. An 
instance of a value type can be converted either to a System.Object or to any other 
interface type implemented by the value type. 
Module Module1   
Public Structure Test 
Public myString as String 
Public myInteger as Integer 
End Structure 
Public Sub Main() 
‘Notice that both declarations are equivalent 
‘Both x and y are instance of type test 
Dim x as New Test() 
Dim y as Test 
x.myInteger = 4 
y.myString = “Test” 
‘Reference to x is assigned to y 
y = x 
y.myInteger = 1 
y.myString = “Changed” 
Console.WriteKine(String.Format(“x :  myInt = {0}  and  String = {1} ”,  _ 
x.myInteger, x.myString)) 
Console.WriteKine(String.Format(“y :  myInt = {0}  and  String = {1} ”,  _ 
y.myInteger, y.myString)) 
End Sub 
Module Module1 
Public Function Add(ByVal x As Object, ByVal y As Object) As Object 
Add = x + y 
End Function 
Public Sub Main 
Dim x As Integer = 2 
Dim y As Integer = 3 
Dim sum As Integer 
Sum = Add(x , y) 
Console.WriteLine(“ {0) + {1} = {2} ”, x, y, sum) 
End Sub 
End Module 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Best online HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer library as well An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Users can add sticky note to PDF document.
copy text from protected pdf; acrobat password protect pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields;
adding password to pdf file; adding a password to a pdf file
In the above example both x and y are boxed before they are passed to Add.  
Then x,y and Sum are boxed before they are passed to WriteLine. 
Unboxing involves the conversion of an instance of a reference type back to its 
original value type. In Vb.net it is done using the helper functions in the 
Microsoft.VisualBasic.Helpers namespace. For example in the above example, 
IntegerType.FromObject is called to unbox the return parameter of type object back 
to Integer. 
More information about Common Type System can be obtained from 
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/cpguide/html/cpconcommontypesystemoverview.asp
The .NET Class Framework
We will now discuss about the .NET Class Framework
In conjunction with the CLR, 
the Microsoft has developed a comprehensive set of framework classes, several of 
which are shown below: 
Since the .NET Class Framework contains literally thousands of types, a set of related 
types is presented to the developer within a single namespace. For example, the 
System namespace (which you should be most familiar with) contains the Object 
base type, from which all other types ultimately derive. In addition the System 
namespace contains types of integers, characters, strings, exception handling, and 
console I/O’s as well as a bunch of utility types that convert safely between data 
types, format data types, generate random numbers, and perform various math 
functions. All applications use types from System namespace. 
To access any platform feature, you need to know which namespace contains the 
type that exposes the functionality you want. If you want to customize the behavior 
of any type, you can simply derive your own type from the desired .NET framework 
type. The .NET Framework relies on the object-oriented nature of the platform to 
present a consistent programming paradigm to software developers. It also enables 
you to create your own namespaces containing their own types, which merge 
seamlessly into the programming paradigm. This greatly simplifies the Software 
Development. 
The table below lists some of the general namespaces, with a brief description of 
what the classes in that namespace is used for: 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Best online HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer library as well An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Users can add sticky note to PDF document.
a pdf password; pdf security password
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields;
break password on pdf; add password to pdf preview
Namespace 
Purpose of Class 
System 
All the basic types used by every application. 
System.Collections 
Managing collections of objects. Includes the 
popular collection types such as Stacks, Queues, 
HashTables etc. 
System.Diagnostics 
Instrumenting and Debugging your application. 
System.Drawing 
Manipulating 2D graphics. Typically used for 
Windows Forms applications and for creating 
Images that are to appear in a web form. 
System.EnterpriseServices 
Managing Transactions, queued components, 
object pooling, just-in-time activation, security 
and other features to make use of managed code 
more efficient on the server. 
System.Globalization 
National Language Support(NLS), such as string 
compares, formatting and calendars. 
System.IO 
Doing Stream I/O, walking directories and files. 
System.Management 
Managing other computers in the enterprise via 
WMI. 
System.Net 
Network Communications. 
System.Reflection 
Inspecting metadata and late binding of types and 
their members. 
System.Resources 
Manipulating external data resources. 
System.Runtime.InteropServices Enabling managed code to access unmanaged OS 
platform facilities, such as COM components and 
functions in Win32 DLLs. 
System.Runtime.Remoting 
Accessing types remotely. 
System.Runtime.Serilization 
Enabling instances of objects to be persisted and 
regenerated from a stream.  
System.Security 
Protecting data and resources. 
System.Text 
Working with Text in different encodings, like 
ASCII  or Unicode. 
System.Threading 
Performing asynchronous operations and 
synchronizing access to resources. 
System.Xml 
Processing XML Schemas and data. 
In addition to the general namespace the .Net Class Framework offers namespaces 
whose types are used for building specific application types. The table below lists 
some of the application specific namespaces: 
Namespace 
Purpose of Types 
System.Web.Services 
Building web services 
System.Web.UI 
Building web forms. 
System.Windows.Forms 
Building Windows GUI applications. 
System.ServiceProcess 
Building a windows service controllable by Service 
Control Manager. 
Refer the following link for .NET framework class library. 
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/cpguide/html/cpconthenetframeworkclasslibrary.asp
Just-In-Time Compilation (JIT)
The MSIL is the language that all of the .NET languages compile down to. After they 
are in this intermediate language, a process called Just-In-Time (JIT) compilation 
occurs when resources are used from your application at runtime. JIT allows “parts” 
of your application to execute when they are needed, which means that if something 
is never needed, it will never compile down to the native code. By using the JIT, the 
CLR can cache code that is used more than once and reuse it for subsequent calls, 
without going through the compilation process again. 
The figure below shows the JIT Process: 
.NET Assembly 
Class Loader    
Intial Reference   
to type  
Assembly Resolver   
IL to PE Conversion 
Managed code        Initial Method   
Call  
CPU   
JIT Compilation Process 
The JIT process enables a secure environment by making certain assumptions: 
• 
Type references are compatible with the type being referenced. 
• 
Operations are invoked on an object only if they are within the execution 
parameters for that object. 
• 
Identities within the application are accurate. 
By following these rules, the managed execution can guarantee that code being 
executed is type safe; the execution will only take place in memory that it is allowed 
to access. This is possible by the verification process that occurs when the MSIL is 
converted into CPU-specific code. During this verification, the code is examined to 
ensure that it is not corrupt, it is type safe, and the code does not interfere with 
existing security policies that are in place on the system. 
2.6 Structure of a .NET Application 
DLL Hell 
DLLs gave developers the ability to create function libraries and programs that could 
be shared with more than one application. Windows itself was based on DLLs. While 
the advantages of shared code modules expanded developer opportunities, it also 
introduced the problem of updates, revisions, and usage. If one program relied on a 
specific version of a DLL, and another program upgraded that same DLL, the first 
program quite often stopped working.  
Microsoft added to the problem with upgrades of some system DLLs, like comctl.dll, 
the library used to get file, font, color and printing dialog boxes. If things weren't 
bad enough with version clashes, if you wanted to uninstall an application, you could 
easily delete a DLL that was still being used by another program.  
Recognizing the problem, Microsoft incorporated the ability to track usage of DLLs 
with the Registry starting formally with Windows 95, and allowed only one version of 
a DLL to run in memory at a time. Adding yet another complication, when a new 
application was installed that used an existing DLL, it would increment a usage 
counter. On uninstall, the counter would be decremented and if no application was 
using the DLL, it could be deleted.  
That was, in theory. Over the history of Windows, the method of tracking of DLL 
usage was changed by Microsoft several times, as well as the problem of rogue 
installations that didn't play by the rules--the result was called "DLL HELL", and the 
user was the victim.  
Solving DLL hell is one thing that the .NET Framework and the CLR targeted. Under 
the .NET Framework, you can now have multiple versions of a DLL running 
concurrently. This allows developers to ship a version that works with their program 
and not worry about stepping on another program. The way .NET does this is to 
discontinue using the registry to tie DLLs to applications and by introducing the 
concept of an assembly.  
On the .NET Platform, if you want to install an application in the clients place all you 
have to do is use XCopy which copies all the necessary program files to a directory 
on the client’s computer. And while uninstalling all you have to do is just delete the 
directory containing the application and your application is uninstalled. 
Metadata
An Assembly is a logical DLL and consists of one or more scripts, DLLs, or 
executables, and a manifest (a collection of metadata in XML format describing how 
assembly elements relate). Metadata stored within the Assembly, is Microsoft's 
solution to the registry problem. On the .NET Platform programs are compiled into 
.NET PE (Portable Executable) files. The header section of every .NET PE file contains 
a special new section for Metadata (This means Metadata for every PE files is 
contained within the PE file itself thus abolishing the need for any separate registry 
entries). Metadata is nothing but a description of every namespace, class, method, 
property etc. contained within the PE file. Through Metadata you can discover all the 
classes and their members contained within the PE file.  
Metadata describes every type and member defined in your code in a Multilanguage 
form. Metadata stores the following information: 
• 
Description of the assembly  
Identity (name, version, culture, public key).  
The types that are exported.  
Other assemblies that this assembly depends on.  
Security permissions needed to run 
• 
Description of types  
Name, visibility, base class, and interfaces implemented.  
Members (methods, fields, properties, events, nested types) 
• 
Attributes  
Additional descriptive elements that modify types and members 
Advantages of Metadata:
Now let us see the advantages of Metadata: 
Self describing files: 
CLR modules and assemblies are self-describing. Module's metadata contains 
everything needed to interact with another module. Metadata automatically provides 
the functionality of Interface Definition Language (IDL) in COM, allowing you to use 
one file for both definition and implementation. Runtime modules and assemblies do 
not even require registration with the operating system. As a result, the descriptions 
used by the runtime always reflect the actual code in your compiled file, which 
increases application reliability.  
Language Interoperability and easier component-based design: 
Metadata provides all the information required about compiled code for you to inherit 
a class from a PE file written in a different language. You can create an instance of 
any class written in any managed language (any language that targets the Common 
Language Runtime) without worrying about explicit marshaling or using custom 
interoperability code.  
Attributes: 
The .NET Framework allows you to declare specific kinds of metadata, called 
attributes, in your compiled file. Attributes can be found throughout the .NET 
Framework and are used to control in more detail how your program behaves at run 
time. Additionally, you can emit your own custom metadata into .NET Framework 
files through user-defined custom attributes.  
Assembly
Assemblies are the building blocks of .NET Framework applications; they form the 
fundamental unit of deployment, version control, reuse, activation scoping, and 
security permissions. An assembly is a collection of types and resources that are 
built to work together and form a logical unit of functionality. An assembly provides 
the common language runtime with the information it needs to be aware of type 
implementations. To the runtime, a type does not exist outside the context of an 
assembly. 
An assembly does the following functions: 
• 
It contains the code that the runtime executes.  
• 
It forms a security boundary. An assembly is the unit at which permissions are 
requested and granted. 
• 
It forms a type boundary. Every type’s identity includes the name of the 
assembly at which it resides. 
• 
It forms a reference scope boundary. The assembly's manifest contains assembly 
metadata that is used for resolving types and satisfying resource requests. It 
specifies the types and resources that are exposed outside the assembly.  
• 
It forms a version boundary. The assembly is the smallest version able unit in the 
common language runtime; all types and resources in the same assembly are 
versioned as a unit.  
• 
It forms a deployment unit. When an application starts, only the assemblies the 
application initially calls must be present. Other assemblies, such as localization 
resources or assemblies containing utility classes, can be retrieved on demand. 
This allows applications to be kept simple and thin when first downloaded. 
• 
It is a unit where side-by-side execution is supported. 
Contents of an Assembly
• 
Assembly Manifest 
• 
Assembly Name 
• 
Version Information 
• 
Types 
• 
Locale 
• 
Cryptographic Hash 
• 
Security Permissions 
Assembly Manifest
Every assembly, whether static or dynamic, contains a collection of data that 
describes how the elements in the assembly relate to each other. The assembly 
manifest contains this assembly metadata. An assembly manifest contains the 
following details: 
• 
Identity. An assembly's identity consists of three parts: a name, a version 
number, and an optional culture. 
• 
File list. A manifest includes a list of all files that make up the assembly.  
• 
Referenced assemblies. Dependencies between assemblies are stored in the 
calling assembly's manifest. The dependency information includes a version 
number, which is used at run time to ensure that the correct version of the 
dependency is loaded. 
• 
Exported types and resources. The visibility options available to types and 
resources include "visible only within my assembly" and "visible to callers outside 
my assembly." 
• 
Permission requests. The permission requests for an assembly are grouped into 
three sets: 1) those required for the assembly to run, 2) those that are desired 
but the assembly will still have some functionality even if they aren't granted, 
and 3) those that the author never wants the assembly to be granted. 
In general, if you have an application comprising of an assembly named Assem.exe 
and a module named Mod.dll. Then the assembly manifest stored within the PE 
Assem.exe will not only contain metadata about the classes, methods etc. contained 
within the Assem.exe file but it will also contain references to the classes, methods 
etc, exported in the Mod.dll file. While the module Mod.dll will only contain metadata 
describing itself. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested