c# convert pdf to image without ghostscript : Create password protected pdf online control Library platform web page asp.net windows web browser changingcourse2-part76

!
!
!
17 
How Many Students are Learning Online? 
For years the number of postsecondary students in the United States has 
increased – driven by both demographics (the increasing number of persons 
graduating from high school) and economic factors (where bad economic times 
are often good for higher education enrollments).  However, higher education 
made news this year when it was reported that the total number of students 
enrolled at U.S. higher education institutions had actually dropped
2
In the face of the softening in the growth of overall enrollments the number of 
students taking at least one online course continued to increase at a robust rate.  
There were 572,000 more online students in fall 2011 than in fall 2010 for a new 
total of 6.7 million students taking at least one online course.  This is a slightly 
larger numeric increase as seen for fall 2009 to fall 2010.  It also is very close to 
the average increase seen for each of the last nine periods (which produced an 
average growth of 568,000 students per year). 
Total and Online Enrollment in Degree-granting Postsecondary Institutions – Fall 2002 through Fall 
2011 
Total 
Enrollment 
Annual 
Growth Rate 
Total 
Enrollment 
Students 
Taking at 
Least One 
Online 
Course 
Online 
Enrollment 
Increase 
over 
Previous 
Year 
Annual 
Growth Rate 
Online 
Enrollment 
Online 
Enrollment 
as a Percent 
of Total 
Enrollment 
Fall 2002 
16,611,710 
NA 
1,602,970 
NA 
NA 
9.6% 
Fall 2003 
16,911,481 
1.8% 
1,971,397 
368,427 
23.0% 
11.7% 
Fall 2004 
17,272,043 
2.1% 
2,329,783 
358,386 
18.2% 
13.5% 
Fall 2005 
17,487,481 
1.2% 
3,180,050 
850,267 
36.5% 
18.2% 
Fall 2006 
17,758,872 
1.6% 
3,488,381 
308,331 
9.7% 
19.6% 
Fall 2007 
18,248,133 
2.8% 
3,938,111 
449,730 
12.9% 
21.6% 
Fall 2008 
19,102,811 
4.7% 
4,606,353 
668,242 
16.9% 
24.1% 
Fall 2009 
20,427,711 
6.9% 
5,579,022 
972,669 
21.1% 
27.3% 
Fall 2010 
21,016,126 
2.9% 
6,142,280 
563,258 
10.1% 
29.2% 
Fall 2011 
20,994,113 
-0.1% 
6,714,792 
572,512 
9.3% 
32.0% 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
2
!
Beckie Supiano, “College Enrollment Dropped Last Year, Preliminary Data Show”, The Chronicle of Higher Education, October 9, 
2012. 
Create password protected pdf online - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
add copy protection pdf; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online
Create password protected pdf online - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
convert password protected pdf to word online; password pdf files
While the absolute number of additional students taking online courses continues 
to increase at rates similar to previous years, the percentage growth that this 
represents is lower because the growth is now on a much larger base.  The most 
recent estimate, for fall 2011, shows an increase of 9.3 percent in the number of 
students taking at least one online course, which is the lowest rate of growth 
observed over the study time period.  While the growth rate may be slowing, it 
is still well in excess of the growth of the overall higher education student body.   
The increase from 1.6 million students taking at least one online course in fall 
2002 to the 6.7 million for fall 2011 represents a compound annual growth rate 
of 17.3 percent.  For comparison, the overall higher education student body has 
grown at an annual rate of 2.6 percent during this same period – from 16.6 
million in fall 2002 to 21.0 million for fall 2011
3
Last year this report speculated the slower rate of growth in the number of 
students taking at least one online course might have been the first sign that the 
upward rise in online enrollments was approaching a plateau.  The results this 
year show that while the growth rate may be slowing, there has been no drop in 
the numeric increase in the number of online students.  And, while lower than 
previous years, a growth rate approaching ten percent on the larger current base 
of students is still substantial.  A plateau for online enrollments may be 
approaching, but there is no evidence that it has yet arrived. 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
3
!
Projections of Education Statistics to 2020, National Center for Education Statistics
!
2,500,000 
5,000,000 
7,500,000 
10,000,000 
12,500,000 
15,000,000 
17,500,000 
20,000,000 
22,500,000 
Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Fall 2006 Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 
2011 
Total and Online Enrollment in Degree-granting Postsecondary 
Institutions: Fall 2002 - Fall 2011 
Overall 
Online 
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Online Remove Password from Protected PDF file. Download Free Trial. Remove password from protected PDF file. Find your password-protected PDF and upload it.
adding a password to a pdf using reader; adding a password to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET Support of converting from any single one PDF page and Able to convert password protected PDF document.
a pdf password online; change password on pdf document
The proportion of higher education students taking at least one online course 
now stands at 32 percent.  For comparison, the first year of this study (fall 2003) 
found slightly less than ten percent of all higher education students were taking at 
least one online course.  The proportion has continued its steady increase almost 
linearly over this ten-year time span
4
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
4
!
Note the percentage of students taking at least one online course has been recalculated as compared to previous reports to reflect 
revised overall enrollment numbers from the National Center for Educational Statistics. 
0% 
5% 
10% 
15% 
20% 
25% 
30% 
35% 
Fall 2002 
Fall 2003 
Fall 2004 
Fall 2005 
Fall 2006 
Fall 2007 
Fall 2008 
Fall 2009 
Fall 2010 
Fall 2011 
Online Enrollment as a Percent of Total Enrollment: Fall 2002 - 
Fall 2011 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed.
pdf password protect; add password to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
convert protected pdf to word online; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
Who Offers Online? 
The first report in this series measured at total of 1.6 million higher education 
students in fall 2002 who were taking at least one of their courses online.  Every 
year since then that number has shown a substantial increase.  What is producing 
this growth – is it due to institutions that had no online offerings in 2002 entering 
the online market, does it come from those pioneering institutions that have 
continued to grow the size of their offerings over time, or does it come from the 
for for-profit sector growing their institutions? 
Even ten years ago the vast majority (71.7%) of higher education institutions had 
some form of online offering, leaving only 28.3 percent without any online.  The 
number of institutions with no online has dropped to less half this value for 2012 
(13.5% with no online offerings in 2012).  A major change has also occurred in the 
nature of the online offerings – a far larger proportion of higher education 
institutions have moved from offering only online courses to providing complete 
online programs (62.4% in 2012 as compared to 34.5% in 2002).  
Type of Online Offerings - 2002 
Online Courses 
and Full Programs 
Online Courses 
Only 
No offerings 
Type of Online Offerings - 2012 
Online Courses and 
Full Programs 
Online Courses 
Only 
No offerings 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source
add password to pdf preview; adding password to pdf
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content more independent PDF files to create a larger toolkit SDK to split password-protected PDF document using
pdf protected mode; create copy protected pdf
In what type of institutions has this change occurred?  Virtually all public 
institutions had online offerings in 2002, so the overall growth in the number for 
2012 was small.  One big change for these schools was the big gain in the 
proportion whose online offerings now include complete online programs (48.9% 
in 2002 and 70.6% in 2012).  The number of private nonprofit institutions with 
online offerings had the greatest increase, with a doubling of the proportion with 
full online programs (from 22.1% in 2002 to 48.4% in 2012). 
Because almost all higher education institutions were already offering some form 
of online in the fall of 2002 the growth in online enrollments could not have 
come from an influx of new schools with online offerings.  While there were a 
number of colleges and universities with online in 2012 that did not have these 
offerings in 2002, they are among the very smallest institutions (less than 1500 
total enrollments), and thus did not have any major impact on the overall online 
enrollment totals.  The continued growth in online enrollments has come from 
the transition of institutions with only a few online courses moving to offer fully 
online programs, and from institutions with online programs expanding their 
offerings and building their enrollments. 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
90% 
100% 
2012 
2002 
2012 
2002 
2012 
2002 
Private for-
profit 
Private 
nonprofit 
Public 
Type of Online Offerings - 2002 and 2012 
Online Courses and Full Programs 
Online Courses Only 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
90% 
100% 
2002 
2012 
2002 
2012 
2002 
2012 
2002 
2012 
2002 
2012 
Under 1500 
1500 - 2999 
3000 - 7499 
7500 - 14999 
15000+ 
Type of Online Offerings - 2002 and 2012 
Online Courses and full programs 
Online Courses Only 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add Easy to change PDF original password; Options for Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields;
pdf protection remover; pdf print protection
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Convert a JPG to PDF. file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF
pdf passwords; pdf security password
Does it Take More Faculty Time and Effort to Teach Online? 
Even in the pre-MOOC days, one of the hopes for online education was that it 
might be a more efficient means for delivering education.  The theory was that 
faculty could teach far more students by taking advantage of the new technology.  
However, before the advent of MOOCs, the prototypical online course in U.S. 
higher education over the past decade has not been structured to provide large 
increases in efficiency.  Most online courses are very similar in design to existing 
face-to-face courses.  These courses typically run on the same semester 
schedule, cover the same corpus of material, represent the same number of 
credit hours, and are led by a single faculty member who is directly interacting 
with his or her students. 
One result of building online courses that mirror the existing face-to-face 
framework has been they place additional demands on the faculty that teach 
them.  Academic leaders are well aware of this – they report they believe it takes 
more time and effort for a faculty member to teach on online courses than to 
teach a corresponding face-to-face course.  In 2006 40.7 percent of academic 
leaders reported they believed that it required more faculty time and effort to 
teach an online course.  Six years later the belief is held even more strongly – the 
most recent results show 44.6 percent of chief academic officers now report this 
to be the case, with only 9.7 percent disagreeing. 
It Takes More Faculty Time and Effort 
to Teach an Online Course Than a 
Face-to-Face Course - 2012 
Agree 
Neutral 
Disagree 
Those academic leaders with greater exposure to online teaching are more likely 
to report it takes more time and effort to teach online.  Academic leaders at 
institutions that do not have any online offerings (and can therefore be assumed 
to have less direct evidence of the level of effort required) do hold a somewhat 
more positive view.  Eighteen percent of these leaders disagree that it takes 
more time and effort (as compared to 9.7 percent for the overall sample). 
One group of institutions, those that are for-profit, display a very different trend 
from other colleges and universities.  While more public institutions (55.2% in 
2012 compared to 44.8% in 2006) and nonprofit institutions (45.3% in 2012 
compared to 41.4% in 2006) now agree it takes more time and effort for faculty 
to teach online courses, the results for for-profit institutions have moved in the 
other direction.  In 2006 for-profit institutions had a level of agreement (31.6%) 
that was already significantly lower than those for other types of institutions.  
While the level of agreement to this statement for pubic and nonprofit 
institutions increased between 2006 and 2012, it decreased at for-profit 
institutions.  The percent of academic leaders at for-profit institutions agreeing it 
takes more time and effort to teach online courses had dropped from 31.6 
percent in 2006 to only 24.2 percent for 2012. 
It may be that for-profit institutions have invested heavily in online learning – 
basing much of their growth on building online programs.  By building online 
courses from scratch, and designing them to be taught by a large number of 
(perhaps adjunct) faculty, they may have better optimized the level of effort that 
will be required. 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
Private for-profit 
Private nonprofit 
Public 
Percent Agreeing it Takes More Faculty Time and Effort to Teach 
an Online Course - 2006 and 2012 
2006 
2012 
Are Learning Outcomes in Online Comparable to Face-to-Face? 
The view that online education is “just as good as” face-to-face instruction is 
decidedly mixed.  The period of 2003 through 2009 displayed a small decrease in 
the proportion of chief academic officers reporting the learning outcomes for 
online education were Inferior or Somewhat Inferior to those for comparable face-
to-face courses.  This proportion then held relatively steady between 2009 and 
2011.  Results for 2012 show a substantial improvement in the opinion of 
academic leaders on the relative quality of the learning outcomes for online 
education.  The percent reporting that outcomes are Inferior or Somewhat Inferior 
dropped from 32.4 percent in 2011 to only 23.0 percent for 2012.  Much of this 
drop was among those saying online learning was Inferior. 
While there has been a recent increase in the proportion of academic leaders that 
have a positive view of the relative quality of the learning outcomes for online 
courses as compared to comparable face-to-face courses, there remains a sizable 
minority that continue to see online as inferior.  Over three-quarters of academic 
leaders believe online is “just as good as” or better.  However, this means almost 
one-quarter of all academic leaders polled continue to believe the learning 
outcomes for online courses are inferior to those for face-to-face instruction. 
0% 
5% 
10% 
15% 
20% 
25% 
30% 
35% 
40% 
45% 
50% 
2003 
2004 
2006 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
Proportion Reporting Learning Outcomes in Online 
Education as Inferior Compared to Face-to-face: 2003 - 2012 
Somewhat inferior 
Inferior 
A consistent finding over the ten years of these reports is the strong positive 
relationship of academic leaders at institutions with online offerings also holding a 
more favorable opinion of the learning outcomes for online education.  Results 
for 2012 continue this trend – chief academic officers at institutions without any 
online offerings are five times as likely as those at institution with fully online 
programs to report online learning outcomes are Inferior or Somewhat Inferior to 
those for comparable face-to-face courses.  It continues to be the case that the 
more extensive the online offerings at an institution, the more positive their 
leaders rate the relative quality of online learning outcomes. 
It remains unclear, however, if it is that institutions with a positive opinion 
towards online are more likely to implement online courses, or if it is that 
institutions with experience with online develop a more positive attitude as their 
experience grows.  Regardless of the causal order, is remains clear academic 
leaders at institutions with online offerings have a much more favorable opinion 
of the learning outcomes in online courses and programs than those at 
institutions without online offerings. 
It is important to understand that chief academic officers are reporting their 
personal perceptions about the relative quality of online and face-to-face instruction.  
In some cases these academic leaders may be basing their opinions on detailed 
analysis of the offerings at their own institutions.  For others the opinion may only 
be based conversations with peers, what they have read in the press, or any 
number of other sources.  The question arises; do institutions with online offerings 
believe they have good means of accessing the quality of their offerings? 
0% 
5% 
10% 
15% 
20% 
25% 
30% 
35% 
40% 
45% 
50% 
55% 
60% 
Online Courses and Full Programs 
Online Courses Only 
No Offerings 
Proportion Reporting Learning Outcomes in Online 
Education as Inferior Compared to Face-to-face: 2012 
Inferior 
Somewhat inferior 
To examine that question, academic leaders were asked if they agreed with the 
statement that “My institution has good tools in place to assess the quality of 
online instruction” as well as a similar question directed at in-person instruction.  
Roughly two-thirds of the academic leaders agreed they have good tools in place 
to assess instructional quality, with the single exception of leaders at institutions 
that offer only online courses and not fully online programs, where less than one-
half agree they have good tools to assess their online instruction.  
Chief academic officers are more positive about their institution’s ability to assess 
instructional quality than are either academic technology administrators or 
teaching faculty.  Compared to the results from a representative national survey 
of teaching faculty and academic technology administrators
5
shows academic 
leaders to be ten to twenty percent more likely to agree or strongly agree that 
their institution has good tools to assess in-person instruction.  They are also 
more positive about their institutions tools to assess online instruction – where 
faculty members (especially those with no online teaching responsibilities) are far 
more pessimistic.   
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
5 Allen, I. Elaine, Jeff Seaman with Doug Lederman and Scott Jaschik, Conflicted: Faculty and Online Education, 2012Inside Higher Ed
Babson Survey Research Group, 2012 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
Institution Offers Online Programs 
Institution Offers Online Courses 
Institution Offers Online Programs 
Institution Offers Online Courses 
Online 
Instruction 
In-person 
Instruction 
My Institution Has Good Tools in Place to Assess the Quality of... 
Strongly Agree 
Agree 
0% 
10% 
20% 
30% 
40% 
50% 
60% 
70% 
80% 
Academic Technology Administrators 
Faculty Teaching Online 
Faculty No Online Teaching 
Academic Technology Administrators 
Faculty Teaching Online 
Faculty No Online Teaching 
Online Instruction 
In-person Instruction 
My Institution Has Good Tools in Place to Assess the Quality of... 
Strongly Agree 
Agree 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested