convert pdf to image asp.net c# : Convert locked pdf to word online application software tool html windows wpf online O'Reilly%20-%20Python%20Cookbook12-part1437

3.8 Filtering a String for a Set of Characters 
Credit: Jürgen Hermann, Nick Perkins 
3.8.1 Problem 
Given a set of characters to keep, you need to build a filtering functor (a function-like, callable 
object). The specific functor you need to build is one that, applied to any string 
s
, returns a copy 
of 
s
that contains only characters in the set.  
3.8.2 Solution 
The 
string.maketrans
function and 
translate
method of string objects are fast and 
handy for all tasks of this ilk:  
import string 
# Make a reusable string of all characters 
_allchars = string.maketrans('', '') 
def makefilter(keep): 
""" Return a functor that takes a string and returns a 
partial copy of that 
string consisting of only the characters in 'keep'. 
""" 
# Make a string of all characters that are not in 'keep' 
delchars = _allchars.translate(_allchars, keep) 
# Return the functor, binding the two strings as default 
args 
return lambda s, a=_allchars, d=delchars: s.translate(a, 
d) 
def canonicform(keep): 
""" Given a string, considered as a set of characters, 
return the 
string's characters as a canonic-form string: 
alphabetized 
and without duplicates. 
""" 
return makefilter(keep)(_allchars) 
if _ _name_ _ == '_ _main_ _': 
identifier = makefilter(string.letters + string.digits + 
'_') 
print identifier(_allchars) 
3.8.3 Discussion 
The key to understanding this recipe lies in the definitions of the 
translate
and 
maketrans
functions in the 
string
module. 
translate
takes a string and replaces each 
character in it with the corresponding character in the translation table passed in as the second 
Convert locked pdf to word online - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change security settings pdf reader; change pdf security settings reader
Convert locked pdf to word online - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf security; pdf secure signature
argument, deleting the characters specified in the third argument. 
maketrans
is a utility routine 
that helps create the translation tables.  
Efficiency is vastly improved by splitting the filtering task into preparation and execution phases. 
The string of all characters is clearly reusable, so we build it once and for all when this module is 
imported. That way, we ensure that each filtering functor has a reference to the same string of all 
characters, not wasting any memory. The string of characters to delete depends on the set of 
characters to keep, so we build it in the 
makefilter
factory function. This is done quite 
rapidly using the 
translate
method to delete the characters to keep from the string of all 
characters. The 
translate
method is very fast, as are the construction and execution of these 
useful little functors. The solution also supplies an extremely simple function to put any set of 
characters, originally an arbitrary string, into canonic-string form (alphabetically sorted, without 
duplicates). The same trick encapsulated in the 
canonicform
function is also explicitly used 
in the test code that is executed when this runs as a script.  
Of course, you don't have to use 
lambda
(here or anywhere else). A named function local to the 
factory function will do just as well. In other words, this recipe works fine if you change 
makefilter
's 
return
statement into the following two statements:  
def filter(s, a=_allchars, d=delchars): return s.translate(a, 
d) 
return filter 
Many Pythonistas would consider this clearer and more readable. 
This isn't a big issue, but remember that 
lambda
is never necessary. In any case in which you 
find yourself straining to fit code into a 
lambda
's limitations (i.e., just an expression, with no 
statements allowed), you can and should always use a local named function instead, to avoid all 
the limitations and problems.  
With Python 2.2, or Python 2.1 and a 
from _ _future_ _ import 
nested_scopes
, you get lexically nested scopes, so that if you want to, you can avoid 
binding 
_allchars
and 
delchars
as default values for arguments in the returned functor. 
However, it is (marginally) faster to use this binding anyway: local variables are the fastest kind to 
access, and arguments are nothing but prebound local variables. Globals and names from nested 
scopes require a little more effort from the interpreter (and sometimes, perhaps more significantly, 
from a human being who is reading the code). This is why we bind 
_allchars
as argument 
a
here despite the fact that, in any release of Python, we could have just accessed it as a global 
variable.  
3.8.4 See Also 
Documentation for the 
maketrans
function in the 
string
module in the Library Reference.  
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
though they are using different types of word processors. Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing by others makes PDF file become
pdf encryption; copy locked pdf
C# Word - Extract or Copy Pages from Word File in C#.NET
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
pdf security; secure pdf file
3.9 Controlling Case 
Credit: Luther Blissett 
3.9.1 Problem 
You need to convert a string from uppercase to lowercase, or vice versa.  
3.9.2 Solution 
That's what the 
upper
and 
lower
methods of string objects are for. Each takes no arguments 
and returns a copy of the string in which each letter has been changed to upper- or lowercase, 
respectively.  
big = little.upper(  ) 
little = big.lower(  ) 
s.capitalize
is similar to 
s[:1].upper()+s[1:].lower( )
. The first character 
is changed to uppercase, and all others are changed to lowercase. 
s.title
is similar, but it 
uppercases the first letter of each word:  
>>> print 'one two three'.capitalize(  ) 
One two three 
>>> print 'one two three'.title(  ) 
One Two Three 
3.9.3 Discussion 
Case manipulation of strings is a very frequent need. Because of this, several string methods let 
you produce case-altered copies of strings. Moreover, you can also check if a string object is 
already in a given case form with the methods 
isupper
islower
, and 
istitle
, which all 
return 
1
if the string is nonempty and already meets the uppercase, lowercase, or titlecase 
constraints. There is no 
iscapitalized
method, but we can code it as a function:  
def iscapitalized(s): 
return s[:1].isupper() and s[1:].islower(  ) 
This may not be exactly what you want, because each of the 
is
methods returns 
0
for an empty 
string, and the three case-checking ones also return 
0
for strings that, while not empty, contain no 
letters at all. This 
iscapitalized
function does not quite match these semantics; rather, it 
accepts a string 
s
only if 
s
starts with an uppercase letter, followed by at least one more character, 
including at least one more letter somewhere, and all letters except the first one are lowercase. 
Here's an alternative whose semantics may be easier to understand:  
def iscapitalized(s): 
return s == s.capitalize(  ) 
However, this version deviates from the boundary-case semantics of the methods by accepting 
strings that are empty or contain no letters. Depending on your exact needs for boundary cases, 
you may of course implement precisely those checks you want to perform.  
3.9.4 See Also 
C# PowerPoint - Extract or Copy PowerPoint Pages from PowerPoint
PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
create pdf the security level is set to high; creating a secure pdf document
VB.NET Word: Extract Text from Microsoft Word Document in VB.NET
Word documents are often locked as static images and the through VB.NET programming, convert Word document to & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf password security; convert locked pdf to word
The Library Reference section on string methods; Perl Cookbook Recipe 1.9.  
C# Excel - Extract or Copy Excel Pages to Excel File in C#.NET
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
decrypt pdf password; pdf unlock
3.10 Reversing a String by Words or Characters 
Credit: Alex Martelli 
3.10.1 Problem 
You want to reverse the characters or words in a string.  
3.10.2 Solution 
Strings are immutable, so we need to make a copy. A list is the right intermediate data structure, 
since it has a 
reverse
method that does just what we want and works in place:  
revchars = list(astring)       # string -> list of chars 
revchars.reverse(  )           # reverse the list in place 
revchars = ''.join(revchars)   # list of strings -> string 
To flip words, we just work with a list of words instead of a list of characters:  
revwords = astring.split(  )       # string -> list of words 
revwords.reverse(  )               # reverse the list in 
place 
revwords = ' '.join(revwords)      # list of strings -> 
string 
Note that we use a 
' '
(space) joiner for the list of words, but a 
''
(empty string) joiner for the 
list of characters.  
If you need to reverse by words while preserving untouched the intermediate whitespace, regular-
expression splitting can be useful:  
import re 
revwords = re.split(r'(\s+)', astring)     # separators too 
since '(...)' 
revwords.reverse(  )                       # reverse the 
list in place 
revwords = ''.join(revwords)               # list of strings 
-> string 
Note that the joiner becomes the empty string again in this case, because the whitespace separators 
are kept in the 
revwords
list by using 
re.split
with a regular expression that includes a 
parenthesized group.  
3.10.3 Discussion 
The snippets in this recipe are fast, readable, and Pythonic. However, some people have an 
inexplicable fetish for one-liners. If you are one of those people, you need an auxiliary function 
(you can stick it in your built-ins from sitecustomize.py) like this:  
def reverse(alist): 
temp = alist[:] 
temp.reverse(  ) 
return temp 
or maybe this, which is messier and slower: 
def reverse_alternative(alist): 
return [alist[i-1] for i in range(len(alist), 0, -1)] 
This is, indeed, in-lineable, but not worth it in my opinion. 
Anyway, armed with such an almost-built-in, you can now do brave new one-liners, such as:  
revchars = ''.join(reverse(list(astring))) 
revwords = ' '.join(reverse(astring.split(  ))) 
In the end, Python does not twist your arm to make you choose the obviously right approach: 
Python gives you the right tools, but it's up to you to use them.  
3.10.4 See Also 
The Library Reference section on sequence types; Perl Cookbook Recipe 1.6.  
3.11 Accessing Substrings 
Credit: Alex Martelli 
3.11.1 Problem 
You want to access portions of a string. For example, you've read a fixed-width record and want to 
extract the record's fields.  
3.11.2 Solution 
Slicing is great, of course, but it only does one field at a time: 
afield = theline[3:8] 
If you need to think in terms of field length, 
struct.unpack
may be appropriate. Here's an 
example of getting a five-byte string, skipping three bytes, getting two eight-byte strings, and then 
getting the rest:  
import struct 
# Get a 5-byte string, skip 3, get two 8-byte strings, then 
all the rest: 
baseformat = "5s 3x 8s 8s" 
numremain = len(theline)-struct.calcsize(baseformat) 
format = "%s %ds" % (baseformat, numremain) 
leading, s1, s2, trailing = struct.unpack(format, theline) 
If you need to split at five-byte boundaries, here's how you could do it:  
numfives, therest = divmod(len(theline), 5) 
form5 = "%s %dx" % ("5s "*numfives, therest) 
fivers = struct.unpack(form5, theline) 
Chopping a string into individual characters is of course easier: 
chars = list(theline) 
If you prefer to think of your data as being cut up at specific columns, slicing within list 
comprehensions may be handier:  
cuts = [8,14,20,26,30] 
pieces = [ theline[i:j] for i, j in zip([0]+cuts, 
cuts+[sys.maxint]) ] 
3.11.3 Discussion 
This recipe was inspired by Recipe 1.1 in the Perl Cookbook. Python's slicing takes the place of 
Perl's 
substr
. Perl's built-in 
unpack
and Python's 
struct.unpack
are similar. Perl's is 
slightly handier, as it accepts a field length of 
*
for the last field to mean all the rest. In Python, 
we have to compute and insert the exact length for either extraction or skipping. This isn't a major 
issue, because such extraction tasks will usually be encapsulated into small, probably local 
functions. Memoizing, or automatic caching, may help with performance if the function is called 
repeatedly, since it allows you to avoid redoing the preparation of the format for the struct 
unpacking. See also Recipe 17.8
.  
In a purely Python context, the point of this recipe is to remind you that 
struct.unpack
is 
often viable, and sometimes preferable, as an alternative to string slicing (not quite as often as 
unpack
versus 
substr
in Perl, given the lack of a 
*
-valued field length, but often enough to 
be worth keeping in mind).  
Each of these snippets is, of course, best encapsulated in a function. Among other advantages, 
encapsulation ensures we don't have to work out the computation of the last field's length on each 
and every use. This function is the equivalent of the first snippet in the solution:  
def fields(baseformat, theline, lastfield=None): 
numremain = len(theline)-struct.calcsize(baseformat) 
format = "%s %d%s" % (baseformat, numremain, lastfield 
and "s" or "x") 
return struct.unpack(format, theline) 
If this function is called in a loop, caching with a key of 
(baseformat,
len(theline), 
lastfield)
may be useful here because it can offer an easy speed-up.  
The function equivalent of the second snippet in the solution is:  
def split_by(theline, n, lastfield=None): 
numblocks, therest = divmod(len(theline), n) 
baseblock = "%d%s"%(n, lastfield and "s" or "x") 
format = "%s %dx"%(baseblock*numblocks, therest) 
And for the third snippet: 
def split_at(theline, cuts, lastfield=None): 
pieces = [ theline[i:j] for i, j in zip([0]+cuts, cuts) ] 
if lastfield: 
pieces.append(theline(cuts[-1:])) 
return pieces 
In each of these functions, a decision worth noticing (and, perhaps, worth criticizing) is that of 
having a 
lastfield=None
optional parameter. This reflects the observation that while we 
often want to skip the last, unknown-length subfield, sometimes we want to retain it instead. The 
use of 
lastfield
in the expression 
lastfield and
"s" or "x"
(equivalent to C's 
lastfield?'s':'c'
) saves an 
if/else
, but it's unclear whether the saving is worth it. 
"sx"[not lastfield]
and other similar alternatives are roughly equivalent in this respect; 
see Recipe 17.6
. When 
lastfield
is false, applying 
struct.unpack
to just a prefix of 
theline
(specifically, 
theline[:struct.calcsize(format)]
) is an alternative, 
but it's not easy to merge with the case of 
lastfield
being true, when the format does need a 
supplementary field for 
len(theline)-struct.calcsize(format)
.  
3.11.4 See Also 
Recipe 17.6
and Recipe 17.8
Perl Cookbook Recipe 1.1.  
3.12 Changing the Indentation of a Multiline String 
Credit: Tom Good 
3.12.1 Problem 
You have a string made up of multiple lines, and you need to build another string from it, adding 
or removing leading spaces on each line so that the indentation of each line is some absolute 
number of spaces.  
3.12.2 Solution 
We don't need 
re
for this. The 
string
module (or string methods, in Python 2.0 and later) is 
quite sufficient:  
import string 
def reindent(s, numSpaces): 
s = string.split(s, '\n') 
s = [(numSpaces * ' ') + string.lstrip(line) for line in 
s] 
s = string.join(s, '\n') 
return s 
3.12.3 Discussion 
When working with text, it may be necessary to change the indentation level of a block. This 
recipe's code takes a multiline string and adds or removes leading spaces on each line so that the 
indentation level of each line of the block matches some absolute number of spaces. For example:  
>>> x = """line one 
... line two 
... and line three 
... """ 
>>> print x 
line one 
line two 
and line three 
>>> print reindent(x, 8) 
line one 
 line two 
and line three 
Even if the lines in 
s
are initially indented differently, this recipe makes their indentation 
homogeneous. This is sometimes what we want, and sometimes not. A frequent need is to adjust 
the amount of leading spaces in each line, so that the relative indentation of each line in the block 
is preserved. This is not hard either, for either positive or negative values of the adjustment. 
However, negative values need a check to ensure that no nonspaces are snipped from the start of 
the lines. Thus, we may as well split the functionality into two functions to perform the 
transformations, plus one to measure the number of leading spaces of each line and return the 
result as a list:  
def addSpaces(s, numAdd): 
white = " "*numAdd 
return white + white.join(s.splitlines(1)) 
def delSpaces(s, numDel): 
def aux(line, numDel=numDel, white=" "*numDel): 
if line[:numDel] != white: 
raise ValueError, "removing more spaces than 
there are!" 
return line[numDel:] 
return ''.join(map(aux, s.splitlines(1))) 
def numSpaces(s): 
return [len(line)-len(line.lstrip()) for line in 
s.splitlines(  )] 
This alternative approach relies on the string method 
splitlines
(and so requires Python 2.0 
or later, like any other recipe using string methods and/or list comprehensions), which is similar to 
a split on 
'\n'
, with the extra ability to leave the trailing newline on each line when called with 
a true argument. This is not often crucial (the last statement in 
delSpaces
, for example, might 
just as easily return 
'\n'.join(map(aux, s.split('\n')))
), but sometimes it 
turns out to be (
addSpaces
could not be quite as short and sweet without this ability of the 
splitlines
string method).  
For example, here's how we can combine these functions to build another function that deletes 
enough leading spaces from each line to ensure that the least-indented line of the block becomes 
flush-left, while preserving the relative indentations of all the other lines:  
def unIndentBlock(s): 
return delSpaces(s, min(numSpaces(s))) 
3.12.4 See Also 
The Library Reference section on sequence types. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested