convert pdf to image asp.net c# : Change pdf security settings control SDK platform web page winforms html web browser O'Reilly%20-%20Python%20Cookbook23-part1449

More generally, however, we may want to hand-craft another solution, which will help us for 
classic classes, mixtures of new-style and classic classes, and other methods that may or may not 
be present in each given superclass. Even though this recipe is about 
_ _init_ _
, its ideas 
can clearly apply to other cases in which we want to call all the superclass implementations of any 
other given method. We then have a choice of three general categories of approaches:  
1.  Check for attribute existence with 
hasattr
before the otherwise normal call.  
2.  Try the call (or the attribute fetching with 
getattr
) and catch the error, if any.  
3.  Use 
getattr
to return the desired attribute, or else a do-nothing function (more 
generally, a callable object with suitable default functionality) if the attribute does not 
exist, then proceed by calling whatever callable is returned.  
The solution shows the first approach, which is the simplest and most appropriate for the common 
case of 
_ _init_ _
in a multiple, classic-class inheritance. (The recipe's code works just as 
well with single inheritance, of course. Indeed, as a special case, it works fine even when used in a 
class without any bases.) Using the LBYL approach here has the great advantage of being obvious. 
Note that the built-in 
hasattr
function implements proper lookup in the bases of our bases, so 
we need not worry about that. As a general idiom, LBYL often has serious issues, but they don't 
apply in this specific case. For example, LBYL can interrupt an otherwise linear control flow with 
readability-damaging checks for rare circumstances. With LBYL, we also run the risk that the 
condition we're checking might change between the moment when we look and the moment when 
we leap (e.g., in a multithreaded scenario). If you ever have to put locks and safeguards bracketing 
the look and the leap, it's best to choose another approach. But this recipe's specific case is one of 
the few in which LBYL is okay.  
The second approach is known as "Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission" (EAFP). The 
following naive variant of it is somewhat fragile:  
class EasierToAskForgiveness_Naive(X, Y, Z): 
def _ _init_ _(self): 
for base in self_ _class_ _._ _bases_ _: 
try: base._ _init_ _(self) 
except AttributeError: pass 
# Subclass-specific initialization follows 
While EAFP is a good general approach and very Pythonic, we still need to be careful to catch 
only the specific exception we're expecting from exactly where we're expecting it. The previous 
code is not accurate and careful enough. If 
base._ _init_ _
exists but fails, and an 
AttributeError
is raised because of an internal logic problem, typo, etc., 
_ _init_ _
will mask it. It's not hard to fashion a much more robust version of EAFP:  
class EasierToAskForgiveness_Robust(X, Y, Z): 
def _ _init_ _(self): 
for base in self_ _class_ _._ _bases_ _: 
try: fun = base._ _init_ _ 
 except AttributeError: pass 
else: fun(self) 
# Subclass-specific initialization follows 
The 
_Robust
variant is vastly superior, since it separates the subtask of accessing the 
base._ 
_init_ _
callable object (unbound method object) from the task of calling it. Only the access 
to the callable object is protected in the 
try
/
except
. The call happens only when no exception 
was seen (which is what the 
else
clause is for in the 
try
/
except
statement), and if executing 
the call raises any exceptions, they are correctly propagated.  
Change pdf security settings - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf encryption; pdf security settings
Change pdf security settings - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create encrypted pdf; pdf password security
Separating the acquisition of the callable from calling it leads us to the third approach, known as 
"Homogenize Different Cases" (HDC). It's best implemented with a small do-nothing local 
function:  
class HomogenizeDifferentCases1(X, Y, Z): 
def _ _init_ _(self): 
def doNothing(obj): pass 
for base in self_ _class_ _._ _bases_ _: 
fun = getattr(base, '_ _init_ _', doNothing) 
fun(self) 
# Subclass-specific initialization follows 
For 
lambda
fanatics, here is an alternative implementation:  
class HomogenizeDifferentCases2(X, Y, Z): 
def _ _init_ _(self): 
for base in self_ _class_ _._ _bases_ _: 
fun = getattr(base, '_ _init_ _', lambda x: None) 
fun(self) 
# Subclass-specific initialization follows 
Again, this is a good general approach (in Python and more generally in programming) that often 
leads to simpler, more linear code (and sometimes to better speed). Instead of checking for 
possible special cases, we do some preprocessing that ensures we are in regular cases, then we 
proceed under full assumption of regularity. The sentinel idiom in searches is a good example of 
HDC in a completely different context, as is the Null Object design pattern (see Recipe 5.24
). The 
only difference between the two HDC examples described here is how the do-nothing callable is 
built: the first uses a simple nested function with names that make its role (or, perhaps, nonrole) 
totally obvious, while the other uses a 
lambda
form. The choice between them is strictly a style 
issue.  
5.4.4 See Also 
Recipe 5.5
and Recipe 5.24
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
easy as possible to change your PDF file permission settings. You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security.
convert locked pdf to word online; copy from locked pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
convert secure webpage to pdf; create pdf the security level is set to high
5.5 Calling a Superclass Implementation of a Method 
Credit: Alex Martelli 
5.5.1 Problem 
You need functionality equivalent to Java's 
super
keyword to delegate part of a method to a 
superclass.  
5.5.2 Solution 
When you override the method of a superclass, you often want to call the superclass's version of a 
method as part of your override. In a Python 2.2 new-style class, the new built-in 
super
function 
helps a lot:  
class A(B, C): 
def amethod(self): 
# First, call the superclass's version 
super(A, self).amethod(  ) 
# Continue with A-specific implementation 
... 
With 
super
, you transparently call 
amethod
in the 
B
or 
C
superclass, or in both, if both 
classes define it, and 
B
also uses 
super
in the same way.  
This doesn't work for classic classes (or in Python 2.1 and earlier), but we can arrange for a 
slightly weaker version:  
def super(class_, inst): 
# First, try the real thing, if available and applicable 
try: return _ _builtins_ _.super(class_, inst) 
except (TypeError, AttributeError): pass 
# Otherwise, arrange for a weaker substitute 
class Super: 
def _ _init_ _(self, class_, inst): 
# Just remember the bases and instance 
self.bases = class_._ _bases_ _ 
self.inst = inst 
def _ _getattr_ _(self, name): 
# Seek the bases for an unbound method; break 
when found 
for base in self.bases: 
method = getattr(name, method, None) 
if method is not None: break 
else: raise AttributeError, name  # No base has 
it, so raise 
# Found, so create and return the bound-method 
version 
import new 
return new.instancemethod(method, self.inst, 
method.im_class) 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
pdf security options; change security settings on pdf
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
You can use our .NET PDF SDK to set file split settings for your PDF You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to Web Security.
change security settings pdf; decrypt pdf file online
Used in a classic class, this 
super
calls a method only in the base where it first finds it. In 
classic-class settings, to call a method in all superclasses that have it, use the approaches shown in 
Recipe 5.4
.  
5.5.3 Discussion 
When you override a method, it is quite common to want to delegate part of its execution to a 
superclass. In other words, even though you are overriding the method to provide extra features, 
you still need to use the superclass's implementation as part of your own. If there is just a single 
superclass, or if you know which superclass implementation you need to call, it is easy to do this 
with the normal Python idiom 
Superclass.themethod(self, ...)
. However, with 
multiple inheritance, you may not know which superclass you want. If you refactor your code, you 
may move methods between superclasses, so you shouldn't depend on a method's exact location in 
the subclass you're writing. Often, you may want to call all implementations of a method in all 
superclasses, particularly for special methods, such as 
_ _init_ _
or 
_ _del_ _
.  
Python 2.2's new-style object model offers a direct solution for this task: the new 
super
built-in 
function. You call 
super
with two arguments: the class in which you're overriding the method 
and 
self
. Looking up any method on 
super
's return value returns the appropriate superclass 
implementation to call as a bound method (i.e., you don't explicitly pass it 
self
again). If you 
use this technique systematically in all the classes that override this method, you end up calling 
every superclass implementation (in the new-style model's canonical method resolution order, so 
you don't have to worry about diamond-shaped inheritance graphs).  
In the classic object model, 
super
doesn't work (and in Python 2.1 and earlier, it doesn't even 
exist). In this recipe, we simulate it in a slightly weaker but still useful way. The recipe defines a 
factory function (i.e., a function that builds and returns a suitable object) also called 
super
, so 
that it shadows the built-in 
super
from normal use. You use it as you use the built-in 
super
except that you can use it in classic or new-style classes interchangeably. The recipe's function 
first tries to use the built-in 
super
. If that's not found or not applicable, the function falls back to 
the slightly weaker but useful equivalent, the 
Super
class.  
The 
Super
class does not let you transparently call a method in several superclasses, nor does it 
apply the new-style method resolution order. However, it does work for simple cases. 
_init_ _
simply stashes away the instance and the list of bases. 
_ _getattr_ _
loops on 
all bases; if the loop does not find the method, and thus never 
break
s, the 
else
clause is 
entered, which raises 
AttributeError
. If the method is found, 
_ _getattr_ _
wraps 
it into a bound method (the better to simulate the built-in 
super
's workings) and returns it. The 
wrapping is performed via the 
instancemethod
function in the 
new
module using the 
im_class
attribute of the unbound method, which records the class that supplied the method.  
5.5.4 See Also 
Recipe 5.4
Recipe 14.8
, and Recipe 14.9
.  
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
change pdf document security properties; copy text from locked pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
decrypt pdf with password; pdf security password
5.6 Implementing Properties 
Credit: Luther Blissett 
5.6.1 Problem 
You want client code to use normal attribute-access syntax for using, binding, or deleting instance 
attributes, but you want the semantics of these actions to be determined by method calls (e.g., to 
compute an attribute's value on the fly).  
5.6.2 Solution 
With Python 2.2 new-style classes, the new built-in 
property
function lets you do this directly:  
class Rectangle(object): 
def _ _init_ _(self, width, height): 
self.width = width 
self.height = height 
def getArea(self): return self.width * self.height 
def setArea(self, value): raise AttributeError, "Can't 
set 'area' attribute" 
area = property(getArea, setArea) 
With classic classes, you must implement properties yourself with the special methods 
_getattr_ _
and 
_ _setattr_ _
:  
class Rectangle: 
def _ _init_ _(self, width, height): 
self.width = width 
self.height = height 
def getArea(self): return self.width * self.height 
def setArea(self, value): raise AttributeError, "Can't 
set 'area' attribute" 
def _ _getattr_ _(self, name): 
if name=='area': return self.getArea(  ) 
raise AttributeError, name 
def _ _setattr_ _(self, name, value): 
if name=='area': return self.setArea(value) 
self._ _dict_ _[name] = value 
5.6.3 Discussion 
Properties are an important object-oriented concept. Instances of a class often need to expose two 
different kinds of attributes: those that hold data and those that are computed on the fly with a 
suitable method, whenever their values are required. If you expose the real attributes directly and 
the computed attributes via methods, such as 
getArea
, current implementation issues will 
appear in the interface for your class and throughout the client code, which should really be 
independent from such issues. And if you ever change the implementation, you are in serious 
trouble.  
The alternative of exposing everything via so-called accessor methods is also far from satisfactory. 
In this case, the code for your class fills up with highly repetitive boilerplate code such as:  
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
decrypt pdf; copy paste encrypted pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
add security to pdf document; decrypt pdf file
def getWidth(self): return self.width 
Even worse, your client code is cluttered with more verbose and less-readable statements such as:  
r.setHeight(r.getHeight(  )+1) 
rather than more concise and readable statements such as: 
r.height += 1 
Moreover, the unnecessary calls to the accessor methods slow your code's operation.  
Properties let you have your cake and eat it too. Client code accesses all attributes uniformly (e.g., 
r.width
r.area
) without caring or needing to know which are real and which are computed 
on the fly. Your class just needs a way to ensure that when client code accesses a computed 
attribute, the right method is called, and its return value is taken as the attribute's value. For 
example:  
>>> r = Rectangle(10, 20) 
>>> print r.area 
200 
When client code accesses a real attribute, nothing special is needed. 
With Python 2.2's new-style classes, you can use the built-in 
property
function to define 
properties. You pass it the accessor functions for get and set operations, optionally followed by 
one to use for deletions (an optional fourth argument is the attribute's documentation string). You 
bind the return value to the name, in class scope, that you want the client code to use when 
accessing the property on class instances.  
In classic classes, you can still have properties, but you need to implement them yourself. When 
any code accesses an attribute that doesn't exist for an object, Python calls the 
_ _getattr_ 
_
method for the class (if it exists) with the attribute's name as the argument. You just need to test 
for the names of the properties that you are implementing and delegate to the appropriate method, 
as shown in the second solution. Whenever an attribute is set on your object (whether the attribute 
exists or not), Python calls the 
_ _setattr_ _
method for the class (if it exists) with the 
attribute's name and the new value assigned to it as arguments. Since 
_ _setattr_ _
is 
called for all attribute settings, it must also deal with setting real attributes in the normal ways (as 
items in 
self._ _dict_ _
). Also, other methods in classes that implement 
_setattr_ _
often set items in 
self._ _dict_ _
directly to avoid triggering 
_setattr_ _
needlessly.  
5.6.4 See Also 
Properties are currently underdocumented. There is a minimal description in Guido's essay 
describing the unification of types and classes 
(http://www.python.org/2.2/descrintro.html#property
); additional minimal information is available 
from the online help system (
help(property)
). However, by the time you read this, the 
Language Reference will likely have been updated.  
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
the conversion settings you like, and download it with one click. The entire process is quick, free and very easy. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will
pdf security remover; change pdf security settings reader
5.7 Implementing Static Methods 
Credit: Alex Martelli, Carel Fellinger 
5.7.1 Problem 
You want to call methods directly on a class without supplying an instance of the class as the first 
argument, or on any instance without having the instance implicitly become the first argument.  
5.7.2 Solution 
In Python 2.2 (on either classic or new-style classes), the new built-in 
staticmethod
function wraps any callable into a static method, and we just bind the same name to the 
staticmethod
object in class scope:  
class Greeter: 
def greet(name): print "Hello", name 
greet = staticmethod(greet) 
In Python 2.1 and earlier, we can easily simulate the same construct: 
class staticmethod: 
def _ _init_ _(self, anycallable): self._ _call_ _ = 
anycallable 
Now, with any release of Python, we can say: 
>>> greeting = Greeter(  ) 
>>> greeting.greet("Peter") 
Hello Peter 
>>> Greeter.greet("Paul") 
Hello Paul 
You can get a static method as a class attribute or as the attribute of any instance of the class. It 
does not matter which, because when you call the static method, it calls the underlying callable 
anyway.  
5.7.3 Discussion 
In Python, when you want to make a function available for calling, you normally expose it as an 
attribute of a module, not of a class. An attribute of a class object that starts out as a Python 
function implicitly mutates into an unbound method (see Recipe 5.13
for a way to exploit this). 
Thus, if you want to make the function available as a class attribute, without mutation, you need to 
wrap the function into a callable of another type and bind that wrapper callable as the class 
attribute. Python 2.2 offers a new built-in 
staticmethod
type that performs just such a 
wrapping. This recipe shows how to use it and how to emulate it easily in earlier Python versions 
with a tiny auxiliary class of the same name.  
As the recipe shows, you normally define the function that will become a static method with a 
def
statement in the class body, and then immediately rebind the same name to the 
staticmethod
object. You don't have to do it this way, though. You could simply write the 
following code outside of the class body:  
def anotherfunction(  ): print "Yes, you CAN do that" 
Greeter.peculiarmethodname = staticmethod(anotherfunction) 
Unless you have a good reason to proceed in this way, such a noncustomary way of doing things 
will just confuse future readers of your code.  
In some languages (such as C++ or Java), static methods are also sometimes called class methods. 
However, the term class methods should be reserved for methods that belong to the class, in the 
same way that normal methods belong to the instance (i.e., for methods that receive the class 
object as their first implicit argument). Static methods in Python, as in C++, are little more than 
bland syntactical sugar for free-standing functions. See Recipe 5.8
for how to make real class 
methods (a la Smalltalk) in Python.  
5.7.4 See Also 
Recipe 5.8
and Recipe 5.13
5.8 Implementing Class Methods 
Credit: Thomas Heller 
5.8.1 Problem 
You want to call methods directly on a class without having to supply an instance, and with the 
class itself as the implied first argument.  
5.8.2 Solution 
In Python 2.2 (on either classic or new-style classes), the new built-in 
classmethod
function 
wraps any callable into a class method, and we just bind the same name to the 
classmethod
object in class scope:  
class Greeter: 
def greet(cls, name): print "Hello from %s"%cls._ _name_ 
_, name 
greet = classmethod(greet) 
In Python 2.1 or earlier, we need a wrapper that is slightly richer than the one used for static 
methods in Recipe 5.7
:  
class classmethod: 
def _ _init_ _(self, func, klass=None): 
self.func = func 
self.klass = klass 
def _ _call_ _(self, *args, **kw): 
return self.func(self.klass, *args, **kw) 
Furthermore, with this solution, the following rebinding is not sufficient:  
greet = classmethod(greet) 
This leaves 
greet.klass
set to 
None
, and if the class inherited any class methods from its 
bases, their 
klass
attributes would also be set incorrectly. It's possible to fix this by defining a 
function to finish preparing a class object and always explicitly calling it right after every 
class
statement. For example:  
def arrangeclassmethods(cls): 
for attribute_name in dir(cls): 
attribute_value = getattr(cls, attribute_name) 
if not isinstance(attribute_value, classmethod): 
continue 
setattr(cls, classmethod(attribute_value.func, cls)) 
However, this isn't completely sufficient in Python versions before 2.2, since, in those versions, 
dir
ignored inherited attributes. We need a recursive walk up the bases for the class, as in Recipe 
5.3
. But a worse problem is that we might forget to call the 
arrangeclassmethods
function on a class object right after its 
class
statement.  
For older Python versions, a better solution is possible if you have Jim Fulton's 
ExtensionClass
class. This class is the heart of Zope, so you have it if Zope is installed 
with Python 2.1 or earlier. If you inherit from 
ExtensionClass.Base
and define a method 
called 
_ _class_init_ _
, the method is called with the class object as its argument after 
the class object is built. Therefore:  
import ExtensionClass 
class ClassWithClassMethods(ExtensionClass.Base): 
def _ _class_init_ _(cls): arrangeclassmethods(cls) 
Inherit from 
ClassWithClassMethods
directly or indirectly, and 
arrangeclassmethods
is called automatically on your class when it's built. You still have 
to write a recursive version of 
arrangeclassmethods
for generality, but at least the 
problem of forgetting to call it is solved.  
Now, with any of these solutions, we can say: 
>>> greeting = Greeter(  ) 
>>> greeting.greet("Peter") 
Hello from Greeter Peter 
>>> Greeter.greet("Paul") 
Hello from Greeter Paul 
5.8.3 Discussion 
Real class methods, like those in Smalltalk, implicitly receive the actual class as the first 
parameter and are inherited by subclasses, which can override them. While they can return 
anything, they are particularly useful as factory methods (i.e., methods that create and return 
instances of their classes). Python 2.2 supports class methods directly. In earlier releases, you need 
a wrapper, such as the 
classmethod
class shown in this recipe, and, more problematically, 
you need to arrange the wrapper objects right after you create a class, so that the objects refer to 
the actual class when you call them later.  
Zope's 
ExtensionClass
helps with the latter part. Metaclasses should also help you achieve 
the same effect, but, since they were hard to use before Python 2.2, and the likeliest reason to still 
use Python 2.1 is that you use a version of Zope that requires Python 2.1, this should be avoided. 
The point is that statements in the class body execute before the class object is created, while our 
arranging needs to take place after that. Classes that inherit from 
ExtensionClass.Base
solve this problem for us, since their 
_ _class_init_ _
method automatically executes 
just after the class object is created, with the class object itself as the only argument. This is an 
ideal situation for us to delegate to our 
arrangeclassmethods
function.  
In Python 2.2, the wrapping inside the class body suffices because the new built-in type 
classmethod
does not need to access the class object at the point of creation, so it's not an 
issue if the class object does not yet exist when the class methods are wrapped. However, notice 
that you have to perform the wrapping again if a subclass overrides particular class methods (not, 
however, if they inherit them).  
5.8.4 See Also 
Recipe 5.7
ExtensionClass
is not available as a standalone class, but is part of Zope 
(http://www.zope.org
).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested