convert pdf to image c# ghostscript : Change pdf document security application SDK utility azure wpf windows visual studio O'Reilly%20-%20Python%20Cookbook57-part1486

return self.reverseLookup[value] 
15.6.3 Discussion 
In C, 
enum
lets you declare several constants, typically with unique values (although you can 
also explicitly arrange for a value to be duplicated under two different names), without necessarily 
specifying the actual values (except when you want it to).  
Python has an accepted idiom that's fine for small numbers of constants:  
A, B, C, D = range(4) 
But this idiom doesn't scale well to large numbers and doesn't allow you to specify values for 
some constants while leaving others to be determined automatically. This recipe provides for all 
these niceties, while optionally verifying that all values (specified and unspecified) are unique. 
Enum values are attributes of an 
Enumeration
class (
Volkswagen.BEETLE
Volkswagen.PASSAT
, etc.). A further feature, missing in C but really quite useful, is the 
ability to go from the value to the corresponding name inside the enumeration (of course, the 
name you get is somewhat arbitrary for those enumerations in which you don't constrain values to 
be unique).  
This recipe's 
Enumeration
class has an instance constructor that accepts a string argument to 
specify the enumeration's name and a list argument to specify the names of all values for the 
enumeration. Each item of the list argument can be a string (to specify that the value named is one 
more than the last value used), or else a tuple with two items (the string that is the value's name 
and the value itself, which must be an integer). The code in this recipe relies heavily on strict type-
checking to find out which case applies, but the recipe's essence would not change by much if the 
checking was performed in a more lenient way (e.g., with the 
isinstance
built-in function).  
Therefore, each instance is equipped with two dictionaries: 
self.lookup
to map names to 
values and 
self.reverselookup
to map values back to the corresponding names. The 
special method 
_ _getattr_ _
lets names be used with attribute syntax (
e.x
is mapped to 
e.lookup['x']
), and the 
whatis
method allows reverse lookups (i.e., finds a name, given 
a value) with comparable syntactic ease.  
Here's an example of how you can use this 
Enumeration
class:  
if _ _name_ _ == '_ _main_ _': 
Volkswagen = Enumeration("Volkswagen", 
["JETTA", "RABBIT", "BEETLE", ("THING", 400), 
"PASSAT", "GOLF", 
("CABRIO", 700), "EURO_VAN", "CLASSIC_BEETLE", 
"CLASSIC_VAN" 
]) 
Insect = Enumeration("Insect", 
["ANT", "APHID", "BEE", "BEETLE", "BUTTERFLY", 
"MOTH", "HOUSEFLY", 
"WASP", "CICADA", "GRASSHOPPER", "COCKROACH", 
"DRAGONFLY" 
]) 
Change pdf document security - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf with password; pdf unlock
Change pdf document security - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change pdf document security properties; decrypt pdf without password
def demo(lines): 
previousLineEmpty = 0 
for x in string.split(lines, "\n"): 
if x: 
if x[0] != '#': 
print ">>>", x; exec x; print 
previousLineEmpty = 1 
else: 
print x 
previousLineEmpty = 0 
elif not previousLineEmpty: 
print x 
previousLineEmpty = 1 
def whatkind(value, enum): 
return enum._ _doc_ _ + "." + enum.whatis(value) 
class ThingWithType: 
def _ _init_ _(self, type): 
self.type = type 
demo(""" 
car = ThingWithType(Volkswagen.BEETLE) 
print whatkind(car.type, Volkswagen) 
bug = ThingWithType(Insect.BEETLE) 
print whatkind(bug.type, Insect) 
print car._ _dict_ _ 
print bug._ _dict_ _ 
pprint.pprint(Volkswagen._ _dict_ _) 
pprint.pprint(Insect._ _dict_ _) 
""") 
Note that attributes of 
car
and 
bug
don't include any of the enum machinery, because that 
machinery is held as class attributes, not as instance attributes. This means you can generate 
thousands of 
car
and 
bug
objects with reckless abandon, never worrying about wasting time or 
memory on redundant copies of the enum stuff.  
15.6.4 See Also 
Recipe 5.16
, which shows how to define constants in Python; documentation on 
_ _getattr_ 
_
in the Language Reference.  
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using simple VB.NET demo code. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
decrypt pdf online; copy text from locked pdf
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
our .NET PDF SDK to set file split settings for your PDF document in Visual You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are Web Security.
creating secure pdf files; pdf security
15.7 Modifying Methods in Place 
Credit: Ken Seehof 
15.7.1 Problem 
You need to globally change the behavior of existing classes in a third-party library—for example, 
by wrapping existing 
_ _init_ _
methods.  
15.7.2 Solution 
Avoid the antipattern of modifying library code, even though you have source for it, or you'll be 
forever chasing upgrades to the library and reapplying your changes to each release. Python's 
introspection lets you noninvasively obtain the same desired effect without changing the library's 
source code:  
# needs Python 2.1 or later 
from _ _future_ _ import nested_scopes 
import new 
def enhance_ _init_ _(klass, f): 
try: ki = klass._ _init_ _ 
except AttributeError: 
def ki(self, *args, **kwds): pass 
klass._ _init_ _ = new.instancemethod( 
lambda *args, **kwds: f(ki, *args, **kwds), None, 
klass) 
def demo(  ): 
class X: 
def _ _init_ _(self, v): 
self.v = v 
def g(_ _init_ _, self, v): 
_ _init_ _(self, v) 
self.parrot='dead' 
enhance_ _init_ _(X, g) 
x = X(2) 
print x.parrot 
demo(  ) 
15.7.3 Discussion 
Once in a while it becomes necessary to globally change the behavior of classes in a third-party 
library, ideally without modifying the source code for that library. This recipe demonstrates the 
ability to modify the 
_ _init_ _
method of an arbitrary class in place at runtime by wrapping 
the method in any given metafunction. In my experience, this approach is also good for making 
functional programmers wince, which can be entertaining.  
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
can print pdf security; decrypt pdf password
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
SDK to set file permissions for your PDF document in Visual to make it as easy as possible to change your PDF You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking
pdf security options; copy locked pdf
Of course, many other forms of currying besides the 
lambda
used in this recipe could be used to 
build the underlying function for the enhanced method.  
15.7.4 See Also 
Recipe 15.8
for currying in general; Recipe 5.14
and Recipe 15.10
for other examples of 
modifying the methods of an instance; antipatterns (patterns that tell how to go from a problem to 
a bad solution) are discussed in detail on the Portland Pattern WikiWiki 
(http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AntiPatterns
).  
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
pdf security remover; convert locked pdf to word doc
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
pdf security password; decrypt a pdf file online
15.8 Associating Parameters with a Function (Currying) 
Credit: Scott David Daniels, Ben Wolfson, Nick Perkins, and Alex Martelli  
15.8.1 Problem 
You need to tweak a function (or other callable) to get another callable with fewer formal 
arguments, keeping the original arguments' given values fixed (i.e., you need to curry a callable to 
make another).  
15.8.2 Solution 
Curry is not just a spice used in Asian cuisine; it's also an important technique in Python and other 
programming languages:  
class curry: 
def _ _init_ _(self, fun, *args, **kwargs): 
self.fun = fun 
 self.pending = args[:] 
self.kwargs = kwargs.copy(  ) 
def _ _call_ _(self, *args, **kwargs): 
if kwargs and self.kwargs: 
kw = self.kwargs.copy(  ) 
kw.update(kwargs) 
else: 
kw = kwargs or self.kwargs 
return self.fun(*(self.pending + args), **kw) 
15.8.3 Discussion 
Popular in functional programming, currying is a way to bind some of the function's arguments 
and wait for the rest of the arguments to show up later. Currying is named in honor of Haskell 
Curry, a mathematician who laid some of the cornerstones in the theory of formal systems and 
processes. The 
curry
function defined in this recipe is called with a callable and some or all of 
the arguments to the callable. The 
curry
function returns a function that takes subsequent 
parameters as arguments, and 
curry
calls the original with all of those parameters. This recipe 
uses a class instance to hold the curried parameters until they're needed. For example:  
double = curry(operator.mul, 2) 
triple = curry(operator.mul, 3) 
Currying is often implemented with 
lambda
forms, but a dedicated class such as the one 
provided in this recipe is clearer and more readable. However, 
lambda
does have the advantage 
that the arguments can be given in any order. If you have such needs and prefer to use explicit 
currying classes (or functions) rather than 
lambda
, you may have to code other dedicated 
adapters for the purpose of renaming or reordering arguments.  
A typical use of 
curry
is to construct callback functions for GUI operations. When the operation 
does not merit a new function name, 
curry
can be useful in creating these little functions. For 
example, this can be the case with commands for Tkinter buttons:  
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Security PDF component download. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. A good external PDF document page(s) extraction tool should be highly
decrypt pdf file online; copy text from encrypted pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
copy paste encrypted pdf; create pdf the security level is set to high
self.button = Button(frame, text='A', 
command=curry(transcript.append, 'A')) 
Recipe 9.2
shows a specialized subset of curry functionality intended to produce callables that 
require no arguments, which are often needed for such GUI-callback usage. However, the recipe 
shown here is vastly more flexible, without substantial extra cost in complexity or performance.  
Currying can also be used interactively to make versions of your functions with debugging-
appropriate defaults or initial parameters filled in for your current case. For example, database 
debugging work might begin by setting:  
Connect = curry(ODBC.Connect, dsn='MyDataSet') 
Another example of the use of 
curry
in debugging is wrapping methods:  
def report(originalFunction, name, *args, **kw): 
print "%s(%s)"%(name, ', '.join(map(repr, args) + 
[k+'='+repr(kw[k]) for k in kw.keys(  )]) 
result = originalFunction(*args, **kw) 
if result: print name, '==>', result 
return result 
class Sink: 
def write(self, text): pass 
dest = Sink(  ) 
dest.write = curry(report, dest.write, 'write') 
print >>dest, 'this', 'is', 1, 'test' 
If you are creating a function for regular use, and there is a good choice for a name, the 
def 
fun
form of function definition is usually more readable and more easily extended. As you can 
see from the implementation, no magic happens to specialize the function with the provided 
parameters. 
curry
should be used when you feel the code is clearer with its use than without. 
Typically, this will emphasize that you are only providing parameters to a commonly used 
function, not providing separate processing.  
Currying also works well in creating a lightweight subclass. You can 
curry
the constructor of a 
class to give the illusion of a subclass:  
BlueWindow = curry(Window, background="blue") 
Of course, 
BlueWindow._ _class_ _
is still 
Window
, not a subclass. But if you're 
changing only default parameters, not behavior, currying is arguably more appropriate than 
subclassing anyway. And you can still pass additional parameters to the curried constructor.  
An alternative implementation of currying uses lexically nested scopes, available in Python 2.2 (or 
2.1 with 
from _ _future_ _ import nested_scopes
). The most general way to 
use nested scopes for currying is something like:  
def curry(*args, **kwds): 
def callit(*moreargs, **morekwds): 
kw = kwds.copy(  ) 
kw.update(morekwds) 
return args[0](*(args[1:]+moreargs), **kw) 
return callit 
This curries positional arguments from the left and gives named arguments specified at call time 
precedence over those specified at currying time, but these policies are clearly easy to alter. This 
version using nested scopes rather than a class is more general, because it avoids unintentionally 
capturing certain argument names, which is inevitable with the class approach. For example, in the 
class-based solution in the recipe, imagine needing to 
curry
callable with a keyword argument 
fun=23
.  
15.8.4 See Also 
Recipe 9.2
shows a specialized subset of the curry functionality that is specifically for GUI 
callbacks.  
15.9 Composing Functions 
Credit: Scott David Daniels 
15.9.1 Problem 
You need to construct a new function by composing existing functions (i.e., each call of the new 
function must call one existing function on its arguments, then another on the result of the first 
one).  
15.9.2 Solution 
Composition is a fundamental operation between functions that yields a new function as a result—
the new function must call one existing function on its arguments, then another on the result of the 
first one. For example, a function that, given a string, returns a copy that is lowercase and does not 
have leading and trailing blanks, is the composition of the existing 
string.lower
and 
string.trim
functions (in this case, it does not matter in which order the two existing 
functions are applied, but generally, it could be important). A class defining the special method 
_call_ _
is often the best Pythonic approach to constructing new functions:  
class compose: 
'''compose functions. compose(f,g,x...)(y...) = 
f(g(y...),x...))''' 
def _ _init_ _(self, f, g, *args, **kwargs): 
self.f = f 
self.g = g 
self.pending = args[:] 
self.kwargs = kwargs.copy(  ) 
def _ _call_ _(self, *args, **kwargs): 
return self.f(self.g(*args, **kwargs), *self.pending, 
**self.kwargs) 
class mcompose(compose): 
'''compose functions. mcompose(f,g,x...)(y...) = 
f(*g(y...),x...))''' 
TupleType = type((  )) 
def _ _call_ _(self, *args, **kwargs): 
mid = self.g(*args, **kwargs) 
if isinstance(mid, self.TupleType): 
return self.f(*(mid + self.pending), 
**self.kwargs) 
return self.f(mid, *self.pending, **self.kwargs) 
15.9.3 Discussion 
The two classes in this recipe show two styles of function composition. The only difference is 
when the second function, 
g
, returns a tuple. 
compose
passes the results of 
g
as 
f
's first 
argument anyway, while 
mcompose
treats them as a tuple of arguments to pass along. Note that 
the extra arguments provided for 
compose
or 
mcompose
are treated as extra arguments for 
f
(as there is no standard functional behavior to follow here):  
compose(f,g, x...)(y...) = f(g(y...), x...) 
mcompose(f,g, x...)(y...) = f(*g(y...), x...) 
As in currying (see Recipe 15.8
), this recipe's functions are for constructing functions from other 
functions. Your goal should be clarity, since there is no efficiency gained by using the functional 
forms.  
Here's a quick example for interactive use: 
parts = compose(' '.join, dir) 
When applied to a module, the callable we just bound to 
parts
gives you an easy-to-view string 
that lists the module's contents.  
I separated 
mcompose
and 
compose
because I think of the two possible forms of function 
composition as being quite different. However, inheritance comes in handy for sharing the 
_init_ _
method, which is identical in both cases. Class inheritance, in Python, should not be 
thought of as mystical. Basically, it's just a lightweight, speedy way to reuse code (code reuse is 
good, code duplication is bad).  
In Python 2.2 (or 2.1 with 
from _ _future_ _ import nested_scopes
), there is 
a better and more concise alternative that uses closures in lieu of class instances. For example:  
def compose(f, g, *orig_args, **orig_kwds): 
def nested_function(*more_args, **more_kwds): 
return f(g(*more_args, **more_kwds), *orig_args, 
**orig_kwds) 
return nested_function 
This 
compose
function is substantially equivalent to, and roughly interchangeable with, the 
compose
class presented in the solution.  
15.9.4 See Also 
Recipe 15.8
for an example of currying (i.e., associating parameters with partially evaluated 
functions).  
15.10 Adding Functionality to a Class 
Credit: Ken Seehof 
15.10.1 Problem 
You need to add functionality to an existing class without changing the source code for that class, 
and inheritance is not applicable (since it would make a new class, not change the old one).  
15.10.2 Solution 
Again, this is a case for introspection and dynamic change. The 
enhance_method
function 
alters a 
klass
class object to substitute a named method with an enhanced version, decorated by 
the 
replacement
function argument. The 
method_logger
method exemplifies a typical 
case of 
replacement
by decorating any method with 
print
statements tracing its calls and 
returns:  
# requires Python 2.1, or 2.2 with classic classes only 
from _ _future_ _ import nested_scopes 
import new 
def enhance_method(klass, method_name, replacement): 
'replace a method with an enhanced version' 
method = getattr(klass, method_name) 
def enhanced(*args, **kwds): return replacement(method, 
*args, **kwds) 
setattr(klass, method_name, new.instancemethod(enhanced, 
None, klass)) 
def method_logger(old_method, self, *args, **kwds): 
'example of enhancement: log all calls to a method' 
print '*** calling: %s%s, kwds=%s' % (old_method._ 
_name_ _, args, kwds) 
return_value = old_method(self, *args, **kwds) # call 
the original method 
print '*** %s returns: %r' % (old_method._ _name_ _, 
return_value) 
return return_value 
def demo(  ): 
class Deli: 
def order_cheese(self, cheese_type): 
print 'Sorry, we are completely out of %s' % 
cheese_type 
d = Deli(  ) 
d.order_cheese('Gouda') 
enhance_method(Deli, 'order_cheese', method_logger) 
d.order_cheese('Cheddar') 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested