convert pdf to image c# ghostscript : Create pdf security software control dll windows azure asp.net web forms O'Reilly%20-%20Python%20Cookbook66-part1496

second argument. The function inserts the second argument in the list so that the list remains 
sorted, and does so in logarithmic (O(log(N))) time. Here, we insert the pair 
(priority, 
data)
. Since pairs (and other tuples, lists, and sequences in general) are compared 
lexicographically, this means that data will be placed in increasing order of priority. Therefore, the 
pop
function, by getting (and removing, via the lists' 
pop
method) the last item in list 
self.queue
, is assured to get the item with the highest priority among those currently in the 
queue. It then applies indexing 
[1]
to throw the priority away and return only the data.  
17.16.4 See Also 
Documentation on the 
bisect
module in the Library Reference.  
Create pdf security - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt password protected pdf; copy from locked pdf
Create pdf security - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf password encryption; decrypt pdf
17.17 Converting Numbers to Rationals via Farey 
Fractions 
Credit: Scott David Daniels 
17.17.1 Problem 
You have a number 
v
(of almost any type) and need to find a rational number (in reduced form) 
that is as close to 
v
as possible but with a denominator no larger than a prescribed value.  
17.17.2 Solution 
Farey fractions, whose crucial properties were studied by Cauchy, are an excellent way to find 
rational approximations of floating-point values:  
def farey(v, lim): 
""" No error checking on args. lim = maximum denominator. 
Results are (numerator, denominator); (1, 0) is 
"infinity". 
""" 
if v < 0: 
n, d = farey(-v, lim) 
return -n, d 
z = lim - lim    # Get a "0 of right type" for 
denominator 
lower, upper = (z, z+1), (z+1, z) 
while 1: 
mediant = (lower[0] + upper[0]), (lower[1] + 
upper[1]) 
if v * mediant[1] > mediant[0]: 
if lim < mediant[1]: return upper 
lower = mediant 
elif v * mediant[1] == mediant[0]: 
if lim >= mediant[1]: return mediant 
if lower[1] < upper[1]: return lower 
return upper 
else: 
if lim < mediant[1]: return lower 
upper = mediant 
For example, 
farey(math.pi, 100) == (22, 7)
17.17.3 Discussion 
The rationals resulting from this algorithm are in reduced form (numerator and denominator 
mutually prime), but the proof, which was given by Cauchy, is rather subtle (see http://www.cut-
the-knot.com/blue/Farey.html
).  
Note the trickiness with 
z
. It is a zero of the same type as the 
lim
argument. This lets you use 
longs as the limit if necessary, without paying a performance price (not even a test) when there's 
no such need.  
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Set PDF security level. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password
copy text from locked pdf; change pdf security settings
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to create a password protected PDF contains file permission limitation. your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
pdf encryption; copy locked pdf
To print odds, you can use: 
n, d = farey(probability, lim) 
print "Odds are %d : %d" % (n, d-n) 
This algorithm is ideally suited for reimplementation in a lower-level language (e.g., C or 
assembly) if you use it heavily. Since the code uses only multiplication and addition, it can play to 
hardware strengths.  
If you are using this in an environment where you call it with a lot of values near 0.0, 1.0, or 0.5 
(or simple fractions), you may find that its convergence is too slow. You can improve its 
convergence in a continued fraction style by appending to the first 
if
in the 
farey
function:  
if v < 0: 
... 
elif v < 0.5: 
n, d = farey((v-v+1)/v, lim) # lim is wrong; decide what 
you want 
return d, n 
elif v > 1: 
intpart = floor(v) 
n, d = farey(v-intpart) 
return n+intpart*d, d 
... 
James Farey was an English surveyor who wrote a letter to the Journal of Science around the end 
of the 18th century. In that letter he observed that, while reading a privately published list of the 
decimal equivalents of fractions, he noticed the following: for any three consecutive fractions in 
the simplest terms (e.g., A/B, C/D, E/F), the middle one (C/D), called the mediant, is equal to the 
ratio (A + E)/(B + F). I enjoy envisioning Mr. Farey sitting up late on a rainy English night, 
reading tables of decimal expansions of fractions by an oil lamp. Calculation has come a long way 
since his day, and I'm pleased to be able to benefit from his work.  
17.17.4 See Also 
Recipe 17.18
for another mathematical evaluation recipe.  
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. We have a privacy
pdf secure; cannot print pdf security
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
convert locked pdf to word doc; decrypt pdf password
17.18 Evaluating a Polynomial 
Credit: Luther Blissett 
17.18.1 Problem 
You need to evaluate a polynomial function, and you know that the obvious way to evaluate a 
polynomial wastes effort; therefore, Horner's well-known formula should always be used instead.  
17.18.2 Solution 
We often need to evaluate a polynomial 
f(x)
, defined by its coefficients (
c[0]+c[1]
x+c[2]
x2+
...), at a given point 
x
. There is an obvious (naive) approach to this, applying the 
polynomial's definition directly:  
def poly_naive(x, coeff): 
result = coeff[0] 
for i in range(1, len(coeff)): 
result = result + coeff[i] * x**i 
return result 
However, this is a substantial waste of computational effort, since raising to a power is a time-
consuming operation. Here, we're wantonly raising 
x
to successive powers. It's better to use 
Horner's well-known formula, based on the observation that the polynomial formula can also be 
indifferently written as 
c[0]+x
(c[1]+x
(c[2]+
.... In other words, it can be written 
with nested parentheses, but without raise-to-power operations, only additions and multiplications. 
Coding a loop for it gives us:  
def poly_horner(x, coeff): 
result = coeff[-1] 
for i in range(-2, -len(coeff)-1, -1): 
result = result*x + coeff[i] 
return result 
17.18.3 Discussion 
Python programmers generally emphasize simplicity, not speed. However, when equally simple 
solutions exist, and one is always faster (even by a little), it seems sensible to use the faster 
solution. Polynomial evaluation is a case in point. The naive approach takes an addition, a 
multiplication, and an exponentiation for each degree of the polynomial. Horner's formula takes 
just a multiplication and an addition for each degree. On my system, evaluating 10,000 integer 
(long) polynomials of order 40 takes 3.37 seconds the naive way and 1.07 seconds the Horner way. 
With float arithmetic, it takes 0.53 seconds the naive way and 0.30 seconds the Horner way. Waste 
not, want not, I say.  
17.18.4 See Also 
Recipe 17.17
for another mathematical evaluation recipe.  
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
All. Create a New AzureCloudService Project in RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
create pdf the security level is set to high; pdf security
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
Create a New ASP.NET MVC3 RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. validateIntegratedM odeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering allowDoubleEscaping
advanced pdf encryption remover; pdf password security
17.19 Module: Finding the Convex Hull of a Set of 2D 
Points 
Credit: Dinu C. Gherman 
Convex hulls of point sets are an important building block in many computational-geometry 
applications. Example 17-1
calculates the convex hull of a set of 2D points and generates an 
Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file to visualize it. Finding convex hulls is a fundamental problem 
in computational geometry and is a basic building block for solving many problems. The 
algorithm used here can be found in any good textbook on computational geometry, such as 
Computational Geometry: Algorithms and Applications, 2nd edition (Springer-Verlag). Note that 
the given implementation is not guaranteed to be numerically stable. It might benefit from using 
the 
Numeric
package for gaining more performance for very large sets of points.  
Example 17-1. Finding the convex hull of a set of 2D points  
""" convexhull.py 
Calculate the convex hull of a set of n 2D points in O(n log 
n) time. 
Taken from Berg et al., Computational Geometry, Springer-
Verlag, 1997. 
Emits output as EPS file. 
When run from the command line, it generates a random set of 
points 
inside a square of given length and finds the convex hull 
for those, 
emitting the result as an EPS file. 
Usage: 
convexhull.py <numPoints> <squareLength> <outFile> 
Dinu C. Gherman 
""" 
import sys, string, random 
# helpers 
def _myDet(p, q, r): 
""" Calculate determinant of a special matrix with three 
2D points. 
The sign, - or +, determines the side (right or left, 
respectively) on which 
the point r lies when measured against a directed vector 
from p to q. 
""" 
# We use Sarrus' Rule to calculate the determinant 
# (could also use the Numeric package...) 
sum1 = q[0]*r[1] + p[0]*q[1] + r[0]*p[1] 
sum2 = q[0]*p[1] + r[0]*q[1] + p[0]*r[1] 
return sum1 - sum2 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
allows users to perform PDF document security settings in added to a specific location on PDF file page. In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete
change security on pdf; pdf secure signature
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Security PDF component download. You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and output a new PDF file.
create encrypted pdf; decrypt a pdf
def _isRightTurn((p, q, r)): 
"Do the vectors pq:qr form a right turn, or not?" 
assert p != q and q != r and p != r 
return _myDet(p, q, r) < 0 
def _isPointInPolygon(r, P): 
"Is point r inside a given polygon P?" 
# We assume that the polygon is a list of points, listed 
clockwise 
for i in xrange(len(P)-1): 
p, q = P[i], P[i+1] 
if not _isRightTurn((p, q, r)): 
return 0 # Out! 
return 1 # It's within! 
def _makeRandomData(numPoints=10, sqrLength=100, 
addCornerPoints=0): 
"Generate a list of random points within a square (for 
test/demo only)" 
# Fill a square with N random points 
min, max = 0, sqrLength 
P = [] 
for i in xrange(numPoints): 
rand = random.randint 
x = rand(min+1, max-1) 
y = rand(min+1, max-1) 
P.append((x, y)) 
# Add some "outmost" corner points 
if addCornerPoints: 
P = P + [(min, min), (max, max), (min, max), (max, 
min)] 
return P 
# output 
epsHeader = """%%!PS-Adobe-2.0 EPSF-2.0 
%%%%BoundingBox: %d %d %d %d 
/r 2 def                %% radius 
/circle                 %% circle, x, y, r --> - 
0 360 arc           %% draw circle 
} def 
1 setlinewidth          %% thin line 
newpath                 %% open page 
0 setgray               %% black color 
""" 
def saveAsEps(P, H, boxSize, path): 
"Save some points and their convex hull into an EPS 
file." 
# Save header 
f = open(path, 'w') 
f.write(epsHeader % (0, 0, boxSize, boxSize)) 
format = "%3d %3d" 
# Save the convex hull as a connected path 
if H: 
f.write("%s moveto\n" % format % H[0]) 
for p in H: 
f.write("%s lineto\n" % format % p) 
f.write("%s lineto\n" % format % H[0]) 
f.write("stroke\n\n") 
# Save the whole list of points as individual dots 
for p in P: 
f.write("%s r circle\n" % format % p) 
f.write("stroke\n") 
# Save footer 
f.write("\nshowpage\n") 
# public interface 
def convexHull(P): 
"Calculate the convex hull of a set of points." 
# Get a local list copy of the points and sort them 
lexically 
points = map(None, P) 
points.sort(  ) 
# Build upper half of the hull 
upper = [points[0], points[1]] 
for p in points[2:]: 
upper.append(p) 
while len(upper) > 2 and not _isRightTurn(upper[-
3:]): 
del upper[-2] 
# Build lower half of the hull 
points.reverse(  ) 
lower = [points[0], points[1]] 
for p in points[2:]: 
lower.append(p) 
while len(lower) > 2 and not _isRightTurn(lower[-
3:]): 
del lower[-2] 
# Remove duplicates 
del lower[0] 
del lower[-1] 
# Concatenate both halves and return 
return tuple(upper + lower) 
# Test 
def test(  ): 
a = 200 
p = _makeRandomData(30, a, 0) 
c = convexHull(p) 
saveAsEps(p, c, a, file) 
if _ _name_ _ == '_ _main_ _': 
try: 
numPoints = string.atoi(sys.argv[1]) 
squareLength = string.atoi(sys.argv[2]) 
path = sys.argv[3] 
except IndexError: 
numPoints = 30 
squareLength = 200 
path = "sample.eps" 
p = _makeRandomData(numPoints, squareLength, 
addCornerPoints=0) 
c = convexHull(p) 
saveAsEps(p, c, squareLength, path) 
17.19.1 See Also 
Computational Geometry: Algorithms and Applications, 2nd edition, by M. de Berg, M. van 
Kreveld, M. Overmars, and O. Schwarzkopf (Springer-Verlag).  
17.20 Module: Parsing a String into a Date/Time Object 
Portably 
Credit: Brett Cannon 
Python's 
time
module supplies the parsing function 
strptime
only on some platforms, and 
not on Windows. Example 17-2
shows a 
strptime
function that is a pure Python 
implementation of the 
time.strptime
function that comes with Python. It is similar to how 
time.strptime
is documented in the standard Python documentation. It accepts two more 
optional arguments, as shown in the following signature:  
strptime(string, format="%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y", option=AS_IS, 
locale_setting=ENGLISH) 
option
's default value of 
AS_IS
gets time information from the string, without any checking 
or filling-in. You can pass 
option
as 
CHECK
, so that the function makes sure that whatever 
information it gets is within reasonable ranges (raising an exception otherwise), or 
FILL_IN
(like 
CHECK
, but also tries to fill in any missing information that can be computed). 
locale_setting
accepts a locale tuple (as created by 
LocaleAssembly
) to specify 
names of days, months, and so on. Currently, 
ENGLISH
and 
SWEDISH
locale tuples are built 
into this recipe's 
strptime
module.  
Although this recipe's 
strptime
cannot be as fast as the version in the standard Python library, 
that's hardly ever a major consideration for typical 
strptime
use. This recipe does offer two 
substantial advantages. It runs on any platform supporting Python and gives perfectly identical 
results on different platforms, while 
time.strptime
exists only on some platforms and tends 
to have different quirks on each platform that supplies it. The optional checking and filling-in of 
information that this recipe provides is also quite handy.  
The locale-setting support of this version of 
strptime
was inspired by that in Andrew 
Markebo's own 
strptime
, which you can find at http://www.fukt.hk-
r.se/~flognat/hacks/strptime.py
. However, this recipe has a more complete implementation of 
strptime
's specification that is based on regular expressions, rather than relying on whitespace 
and miscellaneous characters to split strings. For example, this recipe can correctly parse strings 
based on a format such as 
"%Y%m%d"
.  
Example 17-2. Parsing a string into a date/time object portably  
""" A pure-Python version of strptime. 
As close as possible to time.strptime's specs in the 
official Python docs. 
Locales supported via LocaleAssembly -- examples supplied 
for English and 
Swedish, follow the examples to add your own locales. 
Thanks to Andrew Markebo for his pure Python version of 
strptime, which 
convinced me to improve locale support -- and, of course, to 
Guido van Rossum 
and all other contributors to Python, the best language I've 
ever used! 
""" 
import re 
from exceptions import Exception 
_ _all_ _ = ['strptime', 'AS_IS', 'CHECK', 'FILL_IN', 
'LocaleAssembly', 'ENGLISH', 'SWEDISH'] 
# metadata module 
_ _author_ _ = 'Brett Cannon' 
_ _email_ _ = 'drifty@bigfoot.com' 
_ _version_ _ = '1.5cb' 
_ _url_ _ = 'http://www.drifty.org/' 
# global settings and parameter constants 
CENTURY = 2000 
AS_IS = 'AS_IS' 
CHECK = 'CHECK' 
FILL_IN = 'FILL_IN' 
def LocaleAssembly(DirectiveDict, MonthDict, DayDict, 
am_pmTuple): 
""" Creates locale tuple for use by strptime. 
Accepts arguments dictionaries DirectiveDict (locale-
specific regexes for 
extracting info from time strings), MonthDict (locale-
specific full and 
abbreviated month names), DayDict (locale-specific full 
and abbreviated 
weekday names), and the am_pmTuple tuple (locale-
specific valid 
representations of AM and PM, as a two-item tuple). Look 
at how the 
ENGLISH dictionary is created for an example; make sure 
your dictionary has values 
corresponding to each entry in the ENGLISH dictionary. 
You can override 
any value in the BasicDict with an entry in 
DirectiveDict. 
""" 
BasicDict={'%d':r'(?P<d>[0-3]\d)', # Day of the month 
[01,31] 
'%H':r'(?P<H>[0-2]\d)', # Hour (24-h) [00,23] 
'%I':r'(?P<I>[01]\d)', # Hour (12-h) [01,12] 
'%j':r'(?P<j>[0-3]\d\d)', # Day of the year [001,366] 
'%m':r'(?P<m>[01]\d)', # Month [01,12] 
'%M':r'(?P<M>[0-5]\d)', # Minute [00,59] 
'%S':r'(?P<S>[0-6]\d)', # Second [00,61] 
'%U':r'(?P<U>[0-5]\d)', # Week in the year, Sunday 
first [00,53] 
'%w':r'(?P<w>[0-6])', # Weekday [0(Sunday),6] 
'%W':r'(?P<W>[0-5]\d)', # Week in the year, Monday 
first [00,53] 
'%y':r'(?P<y>\d\d)', # Year without century [00,99] 
'%Y':r'(?P<Y>\d\d\d\d)', # Year with century 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested