convert pdf to image c# ghostscript : Create pdf security application control tool html web page .net online Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%20163-part1585

certificate. The certificate also contains information about the time period over which it is
valid. This is expressed as two fields, called “notBefore” and “notAfter”.
In the Python use of certificates, a client or server can use a certificate to prove who they
are. The other side of a network connection can also be required to produce a certificate,
and that certificate can be validated to the satisfaction of the client or server that requires
such validation. The connection attempt can be set to raise an exception if the validation
fails. Validation is done automatically, by the underlying OpenSSL framework; the
application need not concern itself with its mechanics. But the application does usually
need to provide sets of certificates to allow this process to take place.
Python uses files to contain certificates. They should be formatted as “PEM” (see RFC
1422), which is a base-64 encoded form wrapped with a header line and a footer line:
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
... (certificate in base64 PEM encoding) ...
-----END CERTIFICATE-----
The Python files which contain certificates can contain a sequence of certificates,
sometimes called a certificate chain. This chain should start with the specific certificate
for the principal who “is” the client or server, and then the certificate for the issuer of that
certificate, and then the certificate for the issuer of that certificate, and so on up the chain
till you get to a certificate which is self-signed, that is, a certificate which has the same
subject and issuer, sometimes called a root certificate. The certificates should just be
concatenated together in the certificate file. For example, suppose we had a three
certificate chain, from our server certificate to the certificate of the certification authority
that signed our server certificate, to the root certificate of the agency which issued the
certification authority’s certificate:
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
... (certificate for your server)...
-----END CERTIFICATE-----
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
... (the certificate for the CA)...
-----END CERTIFICATE-----
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
... (the root certificate for the CA's issuer)...
-----END CERTIFICATE-----
If you are going to require validation of the other side of the connection’s certificate, you
need to provide a “CA certs” file, filled with the certificate chains for each issuer you are
willing to trust. Again, this file just contains these chains concatenated together. For
validation, Python will use the first chain it finds in the file which matches.
Some “standard” root certificates are available from various certification authorities:
Create pdf security - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf unlock; pdf security remover
Create pdf security - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
creating secure pdf files; convert locked pdf to word online
CACert.orgThawteVerisignPositive SSL (used by python.org), Equifax and GeoTrust.
In general, if you are using SSL3 or TLS1, you don’t need to put the full chain in your “CA
certs” file; you only need the root certificates, and the remote peer is supposed to furnish
the other certificates necessary to chain from its certificate to a root certificate. See RFC
4158 for more discussion of the way in which certification chains can be built.
If you are going to create a server that provides SSL-encrypted connection services, you
will need to acquire a certificate for that service. There are many ways of acquiring
appropriate certificates,  such  as buying  one  from  a  certification authority. Another
common practice is to generate a self-signed certificate. The simplest way to do this is
with the OpenSSL package, using something like the following:
% openssl req -new -x509 -days 365 -nodes -out cert.pem -keyout cert.pem
Generating a 1024 bit RSA private key
.......++++++
.............................++++++
writing new private key to 'cert.pem'
-----
You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated
into your certificate request.
What you are about to enter is what is called a Distinguished Name or a DN.
There are quite a few fields but you can leave some blank
For some fields there will be a default value,
If you enter '.', the field will be left blank.
-----
Country Name (2 letter code) [AU]:US
State or Province Name (full name) [Some-State]:MyState
Locality Name (eg, city) []:Some City
Organization Name (eg, company) [Internet Widgits Pty Ltd]:My Organization, Inc.
Organizational Unit Name (eg, section) []:My Group
Common Name (eg, YOUR name) []:myserver.mygroup.myorganization.com
Email Address []:ops@myserver.mygroup.myorganization.com
%
The disadvantage of a self-signed certificate is that it is its own root certificate, and no
one else will have it in their cache of known (and trusted) root certificates.
17.3.4. Examples
17.3.4.1. Testing for SSL support
To test for the presence of SSL support in a Python installation, user code should use the
following idiom:
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Set PDF security level. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password
create pdf the security level is set to high; secure pdf remove
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to create a password protected PDF contains file permission limitation. your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
can print pdf security; add security to pdf
try:
import ssl
except ImportError:
pass
else:
... # do something that requires SSL support
17.3.4.2. Client-side operation
This example connects to an SSL server, prints the server’s address and certificate,
sends some bytes, and reads part of the response:
import socket, ssl, pprint
= socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
# require a certificate from the server
ssl_sock = ssl.wrap_socket(s,
ca_certs="/etc/ca_certs_file",
cert_reqs=ssl.CERT_REQUIRED)
ssl_sock.connect(('www.verisign.com'443))
print repr(ssl_sock.getpeername())
print ssl_sock.cipher()
print pprint.pformat(ssl_sock.getpeercert())
# Set a simple HTTP request -- use httplib in actual code.
ssl_sock.write("""GET / HTTP/1.0\r
Host: www.verisign.com\r\n\r\n""")
# Read a chunk of data.  Will not necessarily
# read all the data returned by the server.
data = ssl_sock.read()
# note that closing the SSLSocket will also close the underlying socket
ssl_sock.close()
As of September 6, 2007, the certificate printed by this program looked like this:
{'notAfter''May  8 23:59:59 2009 GMT',
'subject': ((('serialNumber'u'2497886'),),
(('1.3.6.1.4.1.311.60.2.1.3'u'US'),),
(('1.3.6.1.4.1.311.60.2.1.2'u'Delaware'),),
(('countryName'u'US'),),
(('postalCode'u'94043'),),
(('stateOrProvinceName'u'California'),),
(('localityName'u'Mountain View'),),
(('streetAddress'u'487 East Middlefield Road'),),
(('organizationName'u'VeriSign, Inc.'),),
(('organizationalUnitName',
u'Production Security Services'),),
(('organizationalUnitName',
u'Terms of use at www.verisign.com/rpa (c)06'),),
(('commonName'u'www.verisign.com'),))}
which is a fairly poorly-formed 
subject
field.
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. We have a privacy
decrypt pdf online; copy locked pdf
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
advanced pdf encryption remover; change security settings pdf
17.3.4.3. Server-side operation
For server operation, typically you’d need to have a server certificate, and private key,
each in a file. You’d open a socket, bind it to a port, call 
listen()
on it, then start waiting
for clients to connect:
import socket, ssl
bindsocket = socket.socket()
bindsocket.bind(('myaddr.mydomain.com'10023))
bindsocket.listen(5)
When one did, you’d call 
accept()
on the socket to get the new socket from the other
end, and use 
wrap_socket()
to create a server-side SSL context for it:
while True:
newsocket, fromaddr = bindsocket.accept()
connstream = ssl.wrap_socket(newsocket,
server_side=True,
certfile="mycertfile",
keyfile="mykeyfile",
ssl_version=ssl.PROTOCOL_TLSv1)
try:
deal_with_client(connstream)
finally:
connstream.shutdown(socket.SHUT_RDWR)
connstream.close()
Then you’d read data from the 
connstream
and do something with it till you are finished
with the client (or the client is finished with you):
def deal_with_client(connstream):
data = connstream.read()
# null data means the client is finished with us
while data:
if not do_something(connstream, data):
# we'll assume do_something returns False
# when we're finished with client
break
data = connstream.read()
# finished with client
And go back to listening for new client connections.
See also:
Class 
socket.socket
Documentation of underlying 
socket
class
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
All. Create a New AzureCloudService Project in RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
decrypt pdf without password; copy paste encrypted pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
Create a New ASP.NET MVC3 RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. validateIntegratedM odeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering allowDoubleEscaping
decrypt password protected pdf; create secure pdf
SSL/TLS Strong Encryption: An Introduction
Intro from the Apache webserver documentation
RFC 1422: Privacy Enhancement for Internet Electronic Mail: Part II: Certificate-
Based Key Management
Steve Kent
RFC 1750: Randomness Recommendations for Security
D. Eastlake et. al.
RFC 3280: Internet X.509 Public Key Infrastructure Certificate and CRL Profile
Housley et. al.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 17. Interprocess
Communication and Networking »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
allows users to perform PDF document security settings in added to a specific location on PDF file page. In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete
convert locked pdf to word; decrypt pdf with password
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Security PDF component download. You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and output a new PDF file.
pdf security; pdf encryption
index
modules |
next |
previous |
17.4. 
signal
— Set handlers for asynchronous
events
This module provides mechanisms to use signal handlers in Python. Some general rules
for working with signals and their handlers:
A handler for a particular signal, once set, remains installed until it is explicitly reset
(Python  emulates  the  BSD  style  interface  regardless  of  the  underlying
implementation), with the exception of the handler for 
SIGCHLD
, which follows the
underlying implementation.
There is no way to “block” signals temporarily from critical sections (since this is not
supported by all Unix flavors).
Although Python signal handlers are called asynchronously as far as the Python user
is concerned, they can only occur between the “atomic” instructions of the Python
interpreter. This means that signals arriving during long calculations implemented
purely in C (such as regular expression matches on large bodies of text) may be
delayed for an arbitrary amount of time.
When a signal arrives during an I/O operation, it is possible that the I/O operation
raises an exception after the signal handler returns. This is dependent on the
underlying Unix system’s semantics regarding interrupted system calls.
Because  the C signal  handler always  returns, it makes  little  sense to catch
synchronous errors like 
SIGFPE
or 
SIGSEGV
.
Python installs a small number of signal handlers by default: 
SIGPIPE
is ignored (so
write errors on pipes and sockets can be reported as ordinary Python exceptions)
and 
SIGINT
is translated into a 
KeyboardInterrupt
exception. All of these can be
overridden.
Some care must be taken if both signals and threads are used in the same program.
The fundamental thing to remember in using signals and threads simultaneously is:
always perform 
signal()
operations in the main thread of execution. Any thread can
perform an 
alarm()
getsignal()
pause()
setitimer()
or 
getitimer()
; only the
main thread can set a new signal handler, and the main thread will be the only one to
receive signals (this is enforced by the Python 
signal
module, even if the underlying
thread implementation supports sending signals to individual threads). This means
that signals can’t be used as a means of inter-thread communication. Use locks
instead.
The variables defined in the 
signal
module are:
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 17. Interprocess
Communication and Networking »
signal.
SIG_DFL
This is one of two standard signal handling options; it will simply perform the default
function for the signal. For example, on most systems the default action for 
SIGQUIT
is
to dump core and exit, while the default action for 
SIGCHLD
is to simply ignore it.
signal.
SIG_IGN
This is another standard signal handler, which will simply ignore the given signal.
SIG*
All the signal numbers are defined symbolically. For example, the hangup signal is
defined as 
signal.SIGHUP
; the variable names are identical to the names used in C
programs, as found in 
<signal.h>
. The Unix man page for ‘
signal()
‘ lists the existing
signals (on some systems this is signal(2), on others the list is in signal(7)). Note that
not all systems define the same set of signal names; only those names defined by the
system are defined by this module.
signal.
CTRL_C_EVENT
The signal corresponding to the CTRL+C keystroke event. This signal can only be
used with 
os.kill()
.
Availability: Windows.
New in version 2.7.
signal.
CTRL_BREAK_EVENT
The signal corresponding to the CTRL+BREAK keystroke event. This signal can only
be used with 
os.kill()
.
Availability: Windows.
New in version 2.7.
signal.
NSIG
One more than the number of the highest signal number.
signal.
ITIMER_REAL
Decrements interval timer in real time, and delivers 
SIGALRM
upon expiration.
signal.
ITIMER_VIRTUAL
Decrements  interval  timer  only  when  the  process  is  executing,  and  delivers
SIGVTALRM upon expiration.
signal.
ITIMER_PROF
Decrements interval timer both when the process executes and when the system is
executing on behalf of the process. Coupled with ITIMER_VIRTUAL, this timer is
usually used to profile the time spent by the application in user and kernel space.
SIGPROF is delivered upon expiration.
The 
signal
module defines one exception:
exception 
signal.
ItimerError
Raised  to  signal  an  error  from  the  underlying 
setitimer()
or 
getitimer()
implementation. Expect this error if an invalid interval timer or a negative time is
passed to 
setitimer()
. This error is a subtype of 
IOError
.
The 
signal
module defines the following functions:
signal.
alarm
(
time
)
If time is non-zero, this function requests that a 
SIGALRM
signal be sent to the process
in time seconds. Any previously scheduled alarm is canceled (only one alarm can be
scheduled at any time). The returned value is then the number of seconds before any
previously set alarm was to have been delivered. If time is zero, no alarm is
scheduled, and any scheduled alarm is canceled. If the return value is zero, no alarm
is currently scheduled. (See the Unix man page alarm(2).) Availability: Unix.
signal.
getsignal
(
signalnum
)
Return the current signal handler for the signal signalnum. The returned value may be
 callable  Python  object,  or  one  of  the  special  values 
signal.SIG_IGN
,
signal.SIG_DFL
or 
None
. Here, 
signal.SIG_IGN
means that the signal was previously
ignored, 
signal.SIG_DFL
means that the default way of handling the signal was
previously in use, and 
None
means that the previous signal handler was not installed
from Python.
signal.
pause
()
Cause the process to sleep until a signal is received; the appropriate handler will then
be called. Returns nothing. Not on Windows. (See the Unix man page signal(2).)
signal.
setitimer
(
which, seconds
[
, interval
]
)
Sets given interval timer (one of 
signal.ITIMER_REAL
signal.ITIMER_VIRTUAL
or
signal.ITIMER_PROF
 specified  by which  to  fire  after seconds (float is accepted,
different  from 
alarm()
) and after that every interval seconds. The interval timer
specified by which can be cleared by setting seconds to zero.
When an interval timer fires, a signal is sent to the process. The signal sent is
dependent  on  the  timer  being  used; 
signal.ITIMER_REAL
will  deliver 
SIGALRM
,
signal.ITIMER_VIRTUAL
sends 
SIGVTALRM
 and 
signal.ITIMER_PROF
will  deliver
SIGPROF
.
The old values are returned as a tuple: (delay, interval).
Attempting to pass an invalid interval timer will cause an 
ItimerError
. Availability:
Unix.
New in version 2.6.
signal.
getitimer
(
which
)
Returns current value of a given interval timer specified by which. Availability: Unix.
New in version 2.6.
signal.
set_wakeup_fd
(
fd
)
Set the wakeup fd to fd. When a signal is received, a 
'\0'
byte is written to the fd.
This can be used by a library to wakeup a poll or select call, allowing the signal to be
fully processed.
The old wakeup fd is returned. fd must be non-blocking. It is up to the library to
remove any bytes before calling poll or select again.
When threads are enabled, this function can only be called from the main thread;
attempting to call it from other threads will cause a 
ValueError
exception to be raised.
New in version 2.6.
signal.
siginterrupt
(
signalnum, flag
)
Change system call restart behaviour: if flag is 
False
, system calls will be restarted
when interrupted by signal signalnum, otherwise system calls will be interrupted.
Returns  nothing. Availability:  Unix  (see the  man page siginterrupt(3) for further
information).
Note that installing a signal handler with 
signal()
will reset the restart behaviour to
interruptible by implicitly calling 
siginterrupt()
with a true flag value for the given
signal.
New in version 2.6.
signal.
signal
(
signalnum, handler
)
Set the handler for signal signalnum to the function handler. handler can be a callable
Python object taking two arguments (see below), or one of the special values
signal.SIG_IGN
or 
signal.SIG_DFL
. The previous signal handler will be returned (see
the description of 
getsignal()
above). (See the Unix man page signal(2).)
When threads are enabled, this function can only be called from the main thread;
attempting to call it from other threads will cause a 
ValueError
exception to be raised.
The handler is called with two arguments: the signal number and the current stack
frame (
None
or a frame object; for a description of frame objects, see the description
in the type hierarchy or see the attribute descriptions in the 
inspect
module).
On Windows, 
signal()
can only be called with 
SIGABRT
SIGFPE
SIGILL
SIGINT
,
SIGSEGV
, or 
SIGTERM
. A 
ValueError
will be raised in any other case.
17.4.1. Example
Here is a minimal example program. It uses the 
alarm()
function to limit the time spent
waiting to open a file; this is useful if the file is for a serial device that may not be turned
on, which would normally cause the 
os.open()
to hang indefinitely. The solution is to set
a 5-second alarm before opening the file; if the operation takes too long, the alarm signal
will be sent, and the handler raises an exception.
import signal, os
def handler(signum, frame):
print 'Signal handler called with signal', signum
raise IOError("Couldn't open device!")
# Set the signal handler and a 5-second alarm
signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, handler)
signal.alarm(5)
# This open() may hang indefinitely
fd = os.open('/dev/ttyS0', os.O_RDWR)
signal.alarm(0# Disable the alarm
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 17. Interprocess
Communication and Networking »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested