itext convert pdf to image c# : Copy text from encrypted pdf SDK Library project wpf asp.net windows UWP Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%20238-part1668

or your timer function has poor resolution, you might have to pass 100000, or even
1000000, to get consistent results.
When you have a consistent answer, there are three ways you can use it: [1]
import profile
# 1. Apply computed bias to all Profile instances created hereafter.
profile.Profile.bias = your_computed_bias
# 2. Apply computed bias to a specific Profile instance.
pr = profile.Profile()
pr.bias = your_computed_bias
# 3. Specify computed bias in instance constructor.
pr = profile.Profile(bias=your_computed_bias)
If you have a choice, you are better off choosing a smaller constant, and then your
results will “less often” show up as negative in profile statistics.
26.4.8. Using a custom timer
If you want to change how current time is determined (for example, to force use of wall-
clock time or elapsed process time), pass the timing function you want to the 
Profile
class constructor:
pr = profile.Profile(your_time_func)
The resulting profiler will then call 
your_time_func
. Depending on whether you are using
profile.Profile
or 
cProfile.Profile
your_time_func
‘s return value will be interpreted
differently:
profile.Profile
your_time_func
should return a single number, or a list of numbers whose sum is the
current time (like what 
os.times()
returns). If the function returns a single time
number, or the list of returned numbers has length 2, then you will get an especially
fast version of the dispatch routine.
Be warned that you should calibrate the profiler class for the timer function that you
choose (see Calibration). For most machines, a timer that returns a lone integer value
will provide the best results in terms of low overhead during profiling. (
os.times()
is
pretty bad, as it returns a tuple of floating point values). If you want to substitute a
better timer in the cleanest fashion, derive a class and hardwire a replacement
dispatch method  that  best  handles your timer  call, along with the appropriate
calibration constant.
cProfile.Profile
Copy text from encrypted pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf password unlock; change pdf document security
Copy text from encrypted pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change security settings pdf; create secure pdf
your_time_func
should return a single number. If it returns integers, you can also
invoke the class constructor with a second argument specifying the real duration of
one unit of time. For example, if 
your_integer_time_func
returns times measured in
thousands of seconds, you would construct the 
Profile
instance as follows:
pr = cProfile.Profile(your_integer_time_func, 0.001)
As the 
cProfile.Profile
class cannot be calibrated, custom timer functions should
be used with care and should be as fast as possible. For the best results with a
custom timer, it might be necessary to hard-code it in the C source of the internal
_lsprof
module.
Footnotes
[1]
Prior to Python 2.2, it was necessary to edit the profiler source code to embed the
bias as a literal number. You still can, but that method is no longer described,
because no longer needed.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 26. Debugging
and Profiling »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsExtract = true; // Copy is allowed. In this part, you will know how to change and update password for an encrypted PDF file in C# programming
convert locked pdf to word; create secure pdf online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsExtract = True ' Copy is allowed In this part, you will know how to change and update password for an encrypted PDF file in VB.NET programming
pdf password security; change security on pdf
index
modules |
next |
previous |
26.5. 
hotshot
— High performance logging
profiler
New in version 2.2.
This  module  provides  a  nicer  interface  to  the 
_hotshot
C module. Hotshot  is  a
replacement for the existing 
profile
module. As it’s written mostly in C, it should result in
a much smaller performance impact than the existing 
profile
module.
Note:  The 
hotshot
module focuses on minimizing the overhead while profiling, at the
expense of long data post-processing times. For common usage it is recommended to
use 
cProfile
instead. 
hotshot
is not maintained and might be removed from the
standard library in the future.
Changed in version 2.5: The results should be more meaningful than in the past: the
timing core contained a critical bug.
Note:  The 
hotshot
profiler does not yet work well with threads. It is useful to use an
unthreaded script to run the profiler over the code you’re interested in measuring if at all
possible.
class 
hotshot.
Profile
(
logfile
[
, lineevents
[
, linetimings
]]
)
The profiler object. The argument logfile is the name of a log file to use for logged
profile data. The argument lineevents specifies whether to generate events for every
source line, or just on function call/return. It defaults to 
0
(only log function call/return).
The argument linetimings specifies whether to record timing information. It defaults to
1
(store timing information).
26.5.1. Profile Objects
Profile objects have the following methods:
Profile.
addinfo
(
key, value
)
Add an arbitrary labelled value to the profile output.
Profile.
close
()
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 26. Debugging
and Profiling »
VB.NET Excel: Render and Convert Excel File to TIFF Image by Using
contained in the Excel needs to be encrypted, it will If you want to view or edit PDF, Word, Excel or Excel document to REImage, you can just copy following VB
add security to pdf document; pdf secure signature
Close the logfile and terminate the profiler.
Profile.
fileno
()
Return the file descriptor of the profiler’s log file.
Profile.
run
(
cmd
)
Profile  an 
exec
-compatible string in the script environment. The globals from the
__main__
module are used as both the globals and locals for the script.
Profile.
runcall
(
func, *args, **keywords
)
Profile a single call of a callable. Additional positional and keyword arguments may be
passed along; the result of the call is returned, and exceptions are allowed to
propagate cleanly, while ensuring that profiling is disabled on the way out.
Profile.
runctx
(
cmd, globals, locals
)
Evaluate an 
exec
-compatible string in a specific environment. The string is compiled
before profiling begins.
Profile.
start
()
Start the profiler.
Profile.
stop
()
Stop the profiler.
26.5.2. Using hotshot data
New in version 2.2.
This module loads hotshot profiling data into the standard 
pstats
Stats objects.
hotshot.stats.
load
(
filename
)
Load hotshot data from filename. Returns an instance of the 
pstats.Stats
class.
See also:
Module 
profile
The 
profile
module’s 
Stats
class
26.5.3. Example Usage
Note that this example runs the Python “benchmark” pystones. It can take some time to
run, and will produce large output files.
>>> import hotshot, hotshot.stats, test.pystone
>>> prof = hotshot.Profile("stones.prof")
>>> benchtime, stones = prof.runcall(test.pystone.pystones)
>>> prof.close()
>>> stats = hotshot.stats.load("stones.prof")
>>> stats.strip_dirs()
>>> stats.sort_stats('time''calls')
>>> stats.print_stats(20)
850004 function calls in 10.090 CPU seconds
Ordered by: internal time, call count
ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
   3.295    3.295   10.090   10.090 pystone.py:79(Proc0)
150000    1.315    0.000    1.315    0.000 pystone.py:203(Proc7)
50000    1.313    0.000    1.463    0.000 pystone.py:229(Func2)
.
.
.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 26. Debugging
and Profiling »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
26.6. 
timeit
— Measure execution time of
small code snippets
New in version 2.3.
Source code: Lib/timeit.py
This module provides a simple way to time small bits of Python code. It has both a
Command-Line Interface as well as a callable one. It avoids a number of common traps
for measuring execution times. See also Tim Peters’ introduction to the “Algorithms”
chapter in the Python Cookbook, published by O’Reilly.
26.6.1. Basic Examples
The following example shows how the Command-Line Interface can be used to compare
three different expressions:
python -m timeit '"-".join(str(n) for n in range(100))'
10000 loops, best of 3: 40.3 usec per loop
python -m timeit '"-".join([str(n) for n in range(100)])'
10000 loops, best of 3: 33.4 usec per loop
python -m timeit '"-".join(map(str, range(100)))'
10000 loops, best of 3: 25.2 usec per loop
This can be achieved from the Python Interface with:
>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit('"-".join(str(n) for n in range(100))', number=10000)
0.8187260627746582
>>> timeit.timeit('"-".join([str(n) for n in range(100)])', number=10000)
0.7288308143615723
>>> timeit.timeit('"-".join(map(str, range(100)))', number=10000)
0.5858950614929199
Note however that 
timeit
will automatically determine the number of repetitions only
when the command-line interface is used. In the Examples section you can find more
advanced examples.
26.6.2. Python Interface
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 26. Debugging
and Profiling »
The module defines three convenience functions and a public class:
timeit.
timeit
(
stmt='pass', setup='pass', timer=<default timer>, number=1000000
)
Create a 
Timer
instance with the given statement, setup code and timer function and
run its 
timeit()
method with number executions.
New in version 2.6.
timeit.
repeat
(
stmt='pass', setup='pass', timer=<default timer>, repeat=3,
number=1000000
)
Create a 
Timer
instance with the given statement, setup code and timer function and
run its 
repeat()
method with the given repeat count and number executions.
New in version 2.6.
timeit.
default_timer
()
Define a default timer, in a platform-specific manner. On Windows, 
time.clock()
has
microsecond granularity, but 
time.time()
‘s granularity is 1/60th of a second. On Unix,
time.clock()
has 1/100th of a second granularity, and 
time.time()
is much more
precise. On either platform, 
default_timer()
measures wall clock time, not the CPU
time. This means that other processes running on the same computer may interfere
with the timing.
class 
timeit.
Timer
(
stmt='pass', setup='pass', timer=<timer function>
)
Class for timing execution speed of small code snippets.
The constructor takes a statement to be timed, an additional statement used for
setup, and a timer function. Both statements default to 
'pass'
; the timer function is
platform-dependent (see the module doc string). stmt and setup may also contain
multiple statements separated by 
;
or newlines, as long as they don’t contain multi-
line string literals.
To measure the execution time of the first statement, use the 
timeit()
method. The
repeat()
method is a convenience to call 
timeit()
multiple times and return a list of
results.
Changed in version 2.6: The stmt and setup parameters can now also take objects
that are callable without arguments. This will embed calls to them in a timer function
that will then be executed by 
timeit()
. Note that the timing overhead is a little larger
in this case because of the extra function calls.
timeit
(
number=1000000
)
Time number  executions  of  the  main  statement. This  executes  the  setup
statement once, and then returns the time it takes to execute the main statement
a number of times, measured in seconds as a float. The argument is the number
of times through the loop, defaulting to one million. The main statement, the setup
statement and the timer function to be used are passed to the constructor.
Note:  By default, 
timeit()
temporarily turns off garbage collection during the
timing. The advantage of this approach is that it makes independent timings
more comparable. This disadvantage is that GC may be an important component
of the performance of the function being measured. If so, GC can be re-enabled
as the first statement in the setup string. For example:
timeit.Timer('for i in xrange(10): oct(i)''gc.enable()').timeit()
repeat
(
repeat=3, number=1000000
)
Call 
timeit()
a few times.
This is a convenience function that calls the 
timeit()
repeatedly, returning a list of
results. The first argument specifies how many times to call 
timeit()
. The second
argument specifies the number argument for 
timeit()
.
Note:  It’s tempting to calculate mean and standard deviation from the result
vector and report these. However, this is not very useful. In a typical case, the
lowest value gives a lower bound for how fast your machine can run the given
code snippet; higher values in the result vector are typically not caused by
variability in Python’s speed, but by other processes interfering with your timing
accuracy. So the 
min()
of the result is probably the only number you should be
interested in. After that, you should look at the entire vector and apply common
sense rather than statistics.
print_exc
(
file=None
)
Helper to print a traceback from the timed code.
Typical use:
= Timer(...) # outside the try/except
try:
t.timeit(...# or t.repeat(...)
except:
t.print_exc()
The advantage over the standard traceback is that source lines in the compiled
template will be displayed. The optional file argument directs where the traceback
is sent; it defaults to 
sys.stderr
.
26.6.3. Command-Line Interface
When called as a program from the command line, the following form is used:
python -m timeit [-n N] [-r N] [-s S] [-t] [-c] [-h] [statement ...]
Where the following options are understood:
-n
N, 
--number
=N
how many times to execute ‘statement’
-r
N, 
--repeat
=N
how many times to repeat the timer (default 3)
-s
S, 
--setup
=S
statement to be executed once initially (default 
pass
)
-t
--time
use 
time.time()
(default on all platforms but Windows)
-c
--clock
use 
time.clock()
(default on Windows)
-v
--verbose
print raw timing results; repeat for more digits precision
-h
--help
print a short usage message and exit
A multi-line statement may be given by specifying each line as a separate statement
argument; indented lines are possible by enclosing an argument in quotes and using
leading spaces. Multiple -s options are treated similarly.
If -n is not given, a suitable number of loops is calculated by trying successive powers of
10 until the total time is at least 0.2 seconds.
default_timer()
measurations can be affected by other programs running on the same
machine, so the best thing to do when accurate timing is necessary is to repeat the
timing a few times and use the best time. The -r option is good for this; the default of 3
repetitions is probably enough in most cases. On Unix, you can use 
time.clock()
to
measure CPU time.
Note:  There is a certain baseline overhead associated with executing a pass
statement. The code here doesn’t try to hide it, but you should be aware of it. The
baseline overhead can be measured by invoking the program without arguments, and it
might differ between Python versions. Also, to fairly compare older Python versions to
Python 2.3, you may want to use Python’s -O option for the older versions to avoid
timing 
SET_LINENO
instructions.
26.6.4. Examples
It is possible to provide a setup statement that is executed only once at the beginning:
python -m timeit -s 'text = "sample string"; char = "g"' 'char in text'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0877 usec per loop
python -m timeit -s 'text = "sample string"; char = "g"' 'text.find(char)'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.342 usec per loop
>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit('char in text', setup='text = "sample string"; char = "g"')
0.41440500499993504
>>> timeit.timeit('text.find(char)', setup='text = "sample string"; char = "g"')
1.7246671520006203
The same can be done using the 
Timer
class and its methods:
>>> import timeit
>>> = timeit.Timer('char in text', setup='text = "sample string"; char = "g"')
>>> t.timeit()
0.3955516149999312
>>> t.repeat()
[0.40193588800002544, 0.3960157959998014, 0.39594301399984033]
The following examples show how to time expressions that contain multiple lines. Here we
compare the cost of using 
hasattr()
vs. 
try
/
except
to test for missing and present
object attributes:
python -m timeit 'try:'  str.__nonzero__' 'except AttributeError:'  pass'
100000 loops, best of 3: 15.7 usec per loop
python -m timeit 'if hasattr(str, "__nonzero__"): pass'
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.26 usec per loop
python -m timeit 'try:'  int.__nonzero__' 'except AttributeError:'  pass'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.43 usec per loop
python -m timeit 'if hasattr(int, "__nonzero__"): pass'
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.23 usec per loop
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested