itext convert pdf to image c# : Decrypt pdf software application project winforms html .net UWP Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%20247-part1678

The 
site
module also provides a way to get the user directories from the command line:
python3 -m site --user-site
/home/user/.local/lib/python3.3/site-packages
If it is called without arguments, it will print the contents of 
sys.path
on the standard
output, followed by the value of 
USER_BASE
and whether the directory exists, then the
same thing for 
USER_SITE
, and finally the value of 
ENABLE_USER_SITE
.
--user-base
Print the path to the user base directory.
--user-site
Print the path to the user site-packages directory.
If both options are given, user base and user site will be printed (always in this order),
separated by 
os.pathsep
.
If any option is given, the script will exit with one of these values: 
O
if the user site-
packages directory is enabled, 
1
if it was disabled by the user, 
2
if it is disabled for
security reasons or by an administrator, and a value greater than 2 if there is an error.
See also:  PEP 370 – Per user site-packages directory
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 27. Python
Runtime Services »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
Decrypt pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
convert secure webpage to pdf; create pdf the security level is set to high
Decrypt pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change security settings pdf reader; copy paste encrypted pdf
index
modules |
next |
previous |
27.15. 
user
— User-specific configuration
hook
Deprecated since version 2.6: The 
user
module has been removed in Python 3.
As a policy, Python doesn’t run user-specified code on startup of Python programs. (Only
interactive  sessions execute the  script specified  in  the 
PYTHONSTARTUP
environment
variable if it exists).
However, some programs or sites may find it convenient to allow users to have a
standard customization file, which gets run when a program requests it. This module
implements such a mechanism. A program that wishes to use the mechanism must
execute the statement
import user
The 
user
module looks for a file 
.pythonrc.py
in the user’s home directory and if it can
be  opened,  executes  it  (using 
execfile()
 in  its  own  (the  module 
user
‘s) global
namespace. Errors during this phase are not caught; that’s up to the program that
imports the 
user
module, if it wishes. The home directory is assumed to be named by the
HOME
environment variable; if this is not set, the current directory is used.
The  user’s 
.pythonrc.py
could  conceivably  test for 
sys.version
if it wishes to do
different things depending on the Python version.
A warning to users: be very conservative in what you place in your 
.pythonrc.py
file.
Since you don’t know which programs will use it, changing the behavior of standard
modules or functions is generally not a good idea.
A suggestion for programmers who wish to use this mechanism: a simple way to let users
specify options for your package is to have them define variables in their 
.pythonrc.py
file that you test in your module. For example, a module 
spam
that has a verbosity level
can look for a variable 
user.spam_verbose
, as follows:
import user
verbose = bool(getattr(user, "spam_verbose", 0))
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 27. Python
Runtime Services »
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
code in .NET class. Allow to decrypt PDF password and open a password protected document in C#.NET framework. Support to add password
create secure pdf online; decrypt a pdf
(The  three-argument  form of 
getattr()
is used in case the user has not defined
spam_verbose
in their 
.pythonrc.py
file.)
Programs with extensive customization needs are better off reading a program-specific
customization file.
Programs with security or privacy concerns should not import this module; a user can
easily break into a program by placing arbitrary code in the 
.pythonrc.py
file.
Modules for general use should not import this module; it may interfere with the operation
of the importing program.
See also:
Module 
site
Site-wide customization mechanism.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 27. Python
Runtime Services »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
27.16. 
fpectl
— Floating point exception
control
Platforms: Unix
Note:  The 
fpectl
module is not built by default, and its usage is discouraged and may
be dangerous except in the hands of experts. See also the section Limitations and
other considerations on limitations for more details.
Most computers carry out floating point operations in conformance with the so-called
IEEE-754 standard. On any real computer, some floating point operations produce
results that cannot be expressed as a normal floating point value. For example, try
>>> import math
>>> math.exp(1000)
inf
>>> math.exp(1000/ math.exp(1000)
nan
(The example above will work on many platforms. DEC Alpha may be one exception.)
“Inf” is a special, non-numeric value in IEEE-754 that stands for “infinity”, and “nan”
means “not a number.” Note that, other than the non-numeric results, nothing special
happened when you asked Python to carry out those calculations. That is in fact the
default behaviour prescribed in the IEEE-754 standard, and if it works for you, stop
reading now.
In some circumstances, it would be better to raise an exception and stop processing at
the point where the faulty operation was attempted. The 
fpectl
module is for use in that
situation.  It  provides  control  over  floating  point  units  from  several  hardware
manufacturers, allowing the user to turn on the generation of 
SIGFPE
whenever any of the
IEEE-754 exceptions Division by Zero, Overflow, or Invalid Operation occurs. In tandem
with a pair of wrapper macros that are inserted into the C code comprising your python
system, 
SIGFPE
is trapped and converted into the Python 
FloatingPointError
exception.
The 
fpectl
module defines the following functions and may raise the given exception:
fpectl.
turnon_sigfpe
()
Turn on the generation of 
SIGFPE
, and set up an appropriate signal handler.
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 27. Python
Runtime Services »
fpectl.
turnoff_sigfpe
()
Reset default handling of floating point exceptions.
exception 
fpectl.
FloatingPointError
After 
turnon_sigfpe()
has been executed, a floating point operation that raises one
of the IEEE-754 exceptions Division by Zero, Overflow, or Invalid operation will in turn
raise this standard Python exception.
27.16.1. Example
The following example demonstrates how to start up and test operation of the 
fpectl
module.
>>> import fpectl
>>> import fpetest
>>> fpectl.turnon_sigfpe()
>>> fpetest.test()
overflow        PASS
FloatingPointError: Overflow
div by 0        PASS
FloatingPointError: Division by zero
[ more output from test elided ]
>>> import math
>>> math.exp(1000)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in ?
FloatingPointError: in math_1
27.16.2. Limitations and other considerations
Setting up a given processor to trap IEEE-754 floating point errors currently requires
custom code on a per-architecture basis. You may have to modify 
fpectl
to control your
particular hardware.
Conversion of an IEEE-754 exception to a Python exception requires that the wrapper
macros 
PyFPE_START_PROTECT
and 
PyFPE_END_PROTECT
be inserted into your code in an
appropriate fashion. Python itself has been modified to support the 
fpectl
module, but
many other codes of interest to numerical analysts have not.
The 
fpectl
module is not thread-safe.
See also:  Some files in the source distribution may be interesting in learning more
about how this module operates. The include file Include/pyfpe.h discusses the
implementation of this module at some length. Modules/fpetestmodule.c gives several
examples of use. Many additional examples can be found in Objects/floatobject.c.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 27. Python
Runtime Services »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
27.17. 
distutils
— Building and installing
Python modules
The 
distutils
package provides support for building and installing additional modules
into a Python installation. The new modules may be either 100%-pure Python, or may be
extension modules written in C, or may be collections of Python packages which include
modules coded in both Python and C.
This package is discussed in two separate chapters:
See also:
Distributing Python Modules
The manual for developers and packagers of Python modules. This describes how
to prepare 
distutils
-based packages so that they may be easily installed into an
existing Python installation.
Installing Python Modules
An “administrators” manual which includes information on installing modules into an
existing Python installation. You do not need to be a Python programmer to read
this manual.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 27. Python
Runtime Services »
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 27. Python
Runtime Services »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
28. Custom Python Interpreters
The modules described in this chapter allow writing interfaces similar to Python’s
interactive interpreter. If you want a Python interpreter that supports some special feature
in addition to the Python language, you should look at the 
code
module. (The 
codeop
module is lower-level, used to support compiling a possibly-incomplete chunk of Python
code.)
The full list of modules described in this chapter is:
28.1. 
code
— Interpreter base classes
28.1.1. Interactive Interpreter Objects
28.1.2. Interactive Console Objects
28.2. 
codeop
— Compile Python code
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library »
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
28.1. 
code
— Interpreter base classes
The 
code
module provides facilities to implement read-eval-print loops in Python. Two
classes and convenience functions are included which can be used to build applications
which provide an interactive interpreter prompt.
class 
code.
InteractiveInterpreter
(
[
locals
]
)
This class deals with parsing and interpreter state (the user’s namespace); it does not
deal with input buffering or prompting or input file naming (the filename is always
passed in explicitly). The optional locals argument specifies the dictionary in which
code will be executed; it defaults to a newly created dictionary with key 
'__name__'
set to 
'__console__'
and key 
'__doc__'
set to 
None
.
class 
code.
InteractiveConsole
(
[
locals
[
, filename
]]
)
Closely emulate the behavior of the interactive Python interpreter. This class builds on
InteractiveInterpreter
and adds prompting using the familiar 
sys.ps1
and 
sys.ps2
,
and input buffering.
code.
interact
(
[
banner
[
, readfunc
[
, local
]]]
)
Convenience function to run a read-eval-print loop. This creates a new instance of
InteractiveConsole
and 
sets readfunc 
to 
be 
used 
as 
the
InteractiveConsole.raw_input()
method, if provided. If local is provided, it is passed
to  the 
InteractiveConsole
constructor for use as the default namespace for the
interpreter  loop. The 
interact()
method of the instance is then run with banner
passed as the banner to use, if provided. The console object is discarded after use.
code.
compile_command
(
source
[
, filename
[
, symbol
]]
)
This function is useful for programs that want to emulate Python’s interpreter main
loop (a.k.a. the read-eval-print loop). The tricky part is to determine when the user
has entered an incomplete command that can be completed by entering more text (as
opposed to a complete command or a syntax error). This function almost always
makes the same decision as the real interpreter main loop.
source is the source string; filename is the optional filename from which source was
read, defaulting to 
'<input>'
; and symbol is the optional grammar start symbol, which
should be either 
'single'
(the default) or 
'eval'
.
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Standard Library » 28. Custom
Python Interpreters »
Returns a code object (the same as 
compile(source, filename, symbol)
) if the
command  is  complete  and  valid; 
None
if  the  command  is  incomplete;  raises
SyntaxError
if the command is complete and contains a syntax error, or raises
OverflowError
or 
ValueError
if the command contains an invalid literal.
28.1.1. Interactive Interpreter Objects
InteractiveInterpreter.
runsource
(
source
[
, filename
[
, symbol
]]
)
Compile and run some source in the interpreter. Arguments are the same as for
compile_command()
; the default for filename is 
'<input>'
, and for symbol is 
'single'
.
One several things can happen:
The input is incorrect; 
compile_command()
raised an exception (
SyntaxError
or
OverflowError
) . A  syntax  traceback  will  be  printed  by  calling  the
showsyntaxerror()
method. 
runsource()
returns 
False
.
The input is incomplete, and more input is required; 
compile_command()
returned
None
runsource()
returns 
True
.
The input is complete; 
compile_command()
returned a code object. The code is
executed  by  calling  the 
runcode()
(which also handles run-time exceptions,
except for 
SystemExit
). 
runsource()
returns 
False
.
The return value can be used to decide whether to use 
sys.ps1
or 
sys.ps2
to prompt
the next line.
InteractiveInterpreter.
runcode
(
code
)
Execute a code object. When an exception occurs, 
showtraceback()
is called to
display a traceback. All exceptions are caught except 
SystemExit
, which is allowed to
propagate.
A note about 
KeyboardInterrupt
: this exception may occur elsewhere in this code,
and may not always be caught. The caller should be prepared to deal with it.
InteractiveInterpreter.
showsyntaxerror
(
[
filename
]
)
Display the syntax error that just occurred. This does not display a stack trace
because there isn’t one for syntax errors. If filename is given, it is stuffed into the
exception instead of the default filename provided by Python’s parser, because it
always  uses 
'<string>'
when reading from a string. The output is written by the
write()
method.
InteractiveInterpreter.
showtraceback
()
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested