how to convert pdf to image using itextsharp in c# : Change security settings pdf reader application control utility azure web page html visual studio Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%20337-part1778

Combining Positional and Optional arguments
Our program keeps growing in complexity:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("square"type=int,
help="display a square of a given number")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbose", action="store_true",
help="increase output verbosity")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.square**2
if args.verbose:
print "the square of {} equals {}".format(args.square, answer)
else:
print answer
And now the output:
python prog.py
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v] square
prog.py: error: the following arguments are required: square
python prog.py 4
16
python prog.py 4 --verbose
the square of 4 equals 16
python prog.py --verbose 4
the square of 4 equals 16
We’ve brought back a positional argument, hence the complaint.
Note that the order does not matter.
How about we give this program of ours back the ability to have multiple verbosity values,
and actually get to use them:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("square"type=int,
help="display a square of a given number")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbosity"type=int,
help="increase output verbosity")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.square**2
if args.verbosity == 2:
print "the square of {} equals {}".format(args.square, answer)
elif args.verbosity == 1:
print "{}^2 == {}".format(args.square, answer)
else:
print answer
And the output:
Change security settings pdf reader - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf password; decrypt pdf file online
Change security settings pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
advanced pdf encryption remover; create pdf the security level is set to high
python prog.py 4
16
python prog.py 4 -v
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v VERBOSITY] square
prog.py: error: argument -v/--verbosity: expected one argument
python prog.py 4 -v 1
4^2 == 16
python prog.py 4 -v 2
the square of 4 equals 16
python prog.py 4 -v 3
16
These all look good except the last one, which exposes a bug in our program. Let’s fix it
by restricting the values the 
--verbosity
option can accept:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("square"type=int,
help="display a square of a given number")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbosity"type=int, choices=[0, 1, 2],
help="increase output verbosity")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.square**2
if args.verbosity == 2:
print "the square of {} equals {}".format(args.square, answer)
elif args.verbosity == 1:
print "{}^2 == {}".format(args.square, answer)
else:
print answer
And the output:
python prog.py 4 -v 3
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v {0,1,2}] square
prog.py: error: argument -v/--verbosity: invalid choice: 3 (choose from 0, 1, 2)
python prog.py 4 -h
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v {0,1,2}] square
positional arguments:
square                display a square of a given number
optional arguments:
-h, --help            show this help message and exit
-v {0,1,2}, --verbosity {0,1,2}
increase output verbosity
Note that the change also reflects both in the error message as well as the help string.
Now, let’s use a different approach of playing with verbosity, which is pretty common. It
also matches the way the CPython executable handles its own verbosity argument (check
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
change security settings pdf reader; pdf security remover
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
copy text from locked pdf; add security to pdf document
the output of 
python --help
):
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("square"type=int,
help="display the square of a given number")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbosity", action="count",
help="increase output verbosity")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.square**2
if args.verbosity == 2:
print "the square of {} equals {}".format(args.square, answer)
elif args.verbosity == 1:
print "{}^2 == {}".format(args.square, answer)
else:
print answer
We have introduced another action, “count”, to count the number of occurrences of a
specific optional arguments:
python prog.py 4
16
python prog.py 4 -v
4^2 == 16
python prog.py 4 -vv
the square of 4 equals 16
python prog.py 4 --verbosity --verbosity
the square of 4 equals 16
python prog.py 4 -v 1
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v] square
prog.py: error: unrecognized arguments: 1
python prog.py 4 -h
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v] square
positional arguments:
square           display a square of a given number
optional arguments:
-h, --help       show this help message and exit
-v, --verbosity  increase output verbosity
python prog.py 4 -vvv
16
Yes, it’s now more of a flag (similar to 
action="store_true"
) in the previous version
of our script. That should explain the complaint.
It also behaves similar to “store_true” action.
Now here’s a demonstration of what the “count” action gives. You’ve probably seen
this sort of usage before.
And, just like the “store_true” action, if you don’t specify the 
-v
flag, that flag is
considered to have 
None
value.
As should be expected, specifying the long form of the flag, we should get the same
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
create secure pdf online; cannot print pdf security
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
decrypt pdf password online; copy locked pdf
output.
Sadly, our help output isn’t very informative on the new ability our script has
acquired, but that can always be fixed by improving the documentation for out script
(e.g. via the 
help
keyword argument).
That last output exposes a bug in our program.
Let’s fix:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("square"type=int,
help="display a square of a given number")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbosity", action="count",
help="increase output verbosity")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.square**2
# bugfix: replace == with >=
if args.verbosity >= 2:
print "the square of {} equals {}".format(args.square, answer)
elif args.verbosity >= 1:
print "{}^2 == {}".format(args.square, answer)
else:
print answer
And this is what it gives:
python prog.py 4 -vvv
the square of 4 equals 16
python prog.py 4 -vvvv
the square of 4 equals 16
python prog.py 4
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "prog.py", line 11, in <module>
if args.verbosity >= 2:
TypeError: unorderable types: NoneType() >= int()
First output went well, and fixes the bug we had before. That is, we want any value
>= 2 to be as verbose as possible.
Third output not so good.
Let’s fix that bug:
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
change security settings on pdf; convert locked pdf to word online
C# Imaging - Decode Code 93 Barcode in C#.NET
the purpose to provide a higher density and data security enhancement to Load an image or a document(PDF, TIFF, Word, Excel Set the barcode reader settings.
decrypt password protected pdf; pdf password encryption
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("square"type=int,
help="display a square of a given number")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbosity", action="count", default=0,
help="increase output verbosity")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.square**2
if args.verbosity >= 2:
print "the square of {} equals {}".format(args.square, answer)
elif args.verbosity >= 1:
print "{}^2 == {}".format(args.square, answer)
else:
print answer
We’ve just introduced yet another keyword, 
default
. We’ve set it to 
0
in order to make it
comparable to the other int values. Remember that by default, if an optional argument
isn’t specified, it gets the 
None
value, and that cannot be compared to an int value (hence
the 
TypeError
exception).
And:
python prog.py 4
16
You can go quite far just with what we’ve learned so far, and we have only scratched the
surface. The 
argparse
module is very powerful, and we’ll explore a bit more of it before
we end this tutorial.
Getting a little more advanced
What if we wanted to expand our tiny program to perform other powers, not just squares:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("x"type=int, help="the base")
parser.add_argument("y"type=int, help="the exponent")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbosity", action="count", default=0)
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.x**args.y
if args.verbosity >= 2:
print "{} to the power {} equals {}".format(args.x, args.y, answer)
elif args.verbosity >= 1:
print "{}^{} == {}".format(args.x, args.y, answer)
else:
print answer
Output:
C# Image: C# Code to Upload TIFF File to Remote Database by Using
Website project and select WSE Settings 3.0. using System.Security.Cryptography; private void tsbUpload_Click & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
decrypt pdf file; pdf file security
VB Imaging - VB Codabar Generator
check digit function for user's security consideration. also creates Codabar bar code on PDF, WORD, TIFF Able to adjust parameter settings before encoding, like
copy from locked pdf; creating secure pdf files
python prog.py
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v] x y
prog.py: error: the following arguments are required: x, y
python prog.py -h
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v] x y
positional arguments:
x                the base
y                the exponent
optional arguments:
-h, --help       show this help message and exit
-v, --verbosity
python prog.py 4 2 -v
4^2 == 16
Notice that so far we’ve been using verbosity level to change the text that gets displayed.
The following example instead uses verbosity level to display more text instead:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("x"type=int, help="the base")
parser.add_argument("y"type=int, help="the exponent")
parser.add_argument("-v""--verbosity", action="count", default=0)
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.x**args.y
if args.verbosity >= 2:
print "Running '{}'".format(__file__)
if args.verbosity >= 1:
print "{}^{} ==".format(args.x, args.y),
print answer
Output:
python prog.py 4 2
16
python prog.py 4 2 -v
4^2 == 16
python prog.py 4 2 -vv
Running 'prog.py'
4^2 == 16
Conflicting options
So far, we have been working with two methods of an 
argparse.ArgumentParser
instance. Let’s introduce a third one, 
add_mutually_exclusive_group()
. It allows for us to
specify options that conflict with each other. Let’s also change the rest of the program so
that the new functionality makes more sense: we’ll introduce the 
--quiet
option, which
will be the opposite of the 
--verbose
one:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
group = parser.add_mutually_exclusive_group()
group.add_argument("-v""--verbose", action="store_true")
group.add_argument("-q""--quiet", action="store_true")
parser.add_argument("x"type=int, help="the base")
parser.add_argument("y"type=int, help="the exponent")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.x**args.y
if args.quiet:
print answer
elif args.verbose:
print "{} to the power {} equals {}".format(args.x, args.y, answer)
else:
print "{}^{} == {}".format(args.x, args.y, answer)
Our program is now simpler, and we’ve lost some functionality for the sake of
demonstration. Anyways, here’s the output:
python prog.py 4 2
4^2 == 16
python prog.py 4 2 -q
16
python prog.py 4 2 -v
4 to the power 2 equals 16
python prog.py 4 2 -vq
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v | -q] x y
prog.py: error: argument -q/--quiet: not allowed with argument -v/--verbose
python prog.py 4 2 -v --quiet
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v | -q] x y
prog.py: error: argument -q/--quiet: not allowed with argument -v/--verbose
That should be easy to follow. I’ve added that last output so you can see the sort of
flexibility you get, i.e. mixing long form options with short form ones.
Before we conclude, you probably want to tell your users the main purpose of your
program, just in case they don’t know:
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description="calculate X to the power of Y")
group = parser.add_mutually_exclusive_group()
group.add_argument("-v""--verbose", action="store_true")
group.add_argument("-q""--quiet", action="store_true")
parser.add_argument("x"type=int, help="the base")
parser.add_argument("y"type=int, help="the exponent")
args = parser.parse_args()
answer = args.x**args.y
if args.quiet:
print answer
elif args.verbose:
print "{} to the power {} equals {}".format(args.x, args.y, answer)
else:
print "{}^{} == {}".format(args.x, args.y, answer)
Note that slight difference in the usage text. Note the 
[-v | -q]
, which tells us that we
can either use 
-v
or 
-q
, but not both at the same time:
python prog.py --help
usage: prog.py [-h] [-v | -q] x y
calculate X to the power of Y
positional arguments:
x              the base
y              the exponent
optional arguments:
-h, --help     show this help message and exit
-v, --verbose
-q, --quiet
Conclusion
The 
argparse
module offers a lot more than shown here. Its docs are quite detailed and
thorough, and full of examples. Having gone through this tutorial, you should easily digest
them without feeling overwhelmed.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » Python HOWTOs »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
General Python FAQ
Contents
General Python FAQ
General Information
What is Python?
What is the Python Software Foundation?
Are there copyright restrictions on the use of Python?
Why was Python created in the first place?
What is Python good for?
How does the Python version numbering scheme work?
How do I obtain a copy of the Python source?
How do I get documentation on Python?
I’ve never programmed before. Is there a Python tutorial?
Is there a newsgroup or mailing list devoted to Python?
How do I get a beta test version of Python?
How do I submit bug reports and patches for Python?
Are there any published articles about Python that I can reference?
Are there any books on Python?
Where in the world is www.python.org located?
Why is it called Python?
Do I have to like “Monty Python’s Flying Circus”?
Python in the real world
How stable is Python?
How many people are using Python?
Have any significant projects been done in Python?
What new developments are expected for Python in the future?
Is it reasonable to propose incompatible changes to Python?
Is Python Y2K (Year 2000) Compliant?
Is Python a good language for beginning programmers?
Upgrading Python
What is this bsddb185 module my application keeps complaining about?
General Information
What is Python?
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » Python Frequently Asked Questions »
Python  is  an  interpreted,  interactive,  object-oriented  programming  language. It
incorporates modules, exceptions, dynamic typing, very high level dynamic data types,
and classes. Python combines remarkable power with very clear syntax. It has interfaces
to many system calls and libraries, as well as to various window systems, and is
extensible in C or C++. It is also usable as an extension language for applications that
need a programmable interface. Finally, Python is portable: it runs on many Unix variants,
on the Mac, and on PCs under MS-DOS, Windows, Windows NT, and OS/2.
To find out more, start with The Python Tutorial. The Beginner’s Guide to Python links to
other introductory tutorials and resources for learning Python.
What is the Python Software Foundation?
The Python Software Foundation is an independent non-profit organization that holds the
copyright on Python versions 2.1 and newer. The PSF’s mission is to advance open
source technology related to the Python programming language and to publicize the use
of Python. The PSF’s home page is at http://www.python.org/psf/.
Donations to the PSF are tax-exempt in the US. If you use Python and find it helpful,
please contribute via the PSF donation page.
Are there copyright restrictions on the use of Python?
You can do anything you want with the source, as long as you leave the copyrights in and
display those copyrights in any documentation about Python that you produce. If you
honor the copyright rules, it’s OK to use Python for commercial use, to sell copies of
Python in source or binary form (modified or unmodified), or to sell products that
incorporate Python in some form. We would still like to know about all commercial use of
Python, of course.
See the PSF license page to find further explanations and a link to the full text of the
license.
The Python logo is trademarked, and in certain cases permission is required to use it.
Consult the Trademark Usage Policy for more information.
Why was Python created in the first place?
Here’s a very brief summary of what started it all, written by Guido van Rossum:
I had extensive experience with implementing an interpreted language in the ABC
group at CWI, and from working with this group I had learned a lot about language
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested