how to convert pdf to image using itextsharp in c# : Create pdf the security level is set to high application SDK tool html wpf web page online Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%20340-part1782

legal. Write 
from package.sub import m2
instead. Relative imports can lead to a module
being initialized twice, leading to confusing bugs. See PEP 328 for details.
It is sometimes necessary to move imports to a function or class to avoid problems with
circular imports. Gordon McMillan says:
Circular imports are fine where both modules use the “import <module>” form of
import. They fail when the 2nd module wants to grab a name out of the first (“from
module import name”) and the import is at the top level. That’s because names in
the 1st are not yet available, because the first module is busy importing the 2nd.
In this case, if the second module is only used in one function, then the import can easily
be moved into that function. By the time the import is called, the first module will have
finished initializing, and the second module can do its import.
It may also be necessary to move imports out of the top level of code if some of the
modules are platform-specific. In that case, it may not even be possible to import all of
the modules at the top of the file. In this case, importing the correct modules in the
corresponding platform-specific code is a good option.
Only move imports into a local scope, such as inside a function definition, if it’s necessary
to solve a problem such as avoiding a circular import or are trying to reduce the
initialization time of a module. This technique is especially helpful if many of the imports
are unnecessary depending on how the program executes. You may also want to move
imports into a function if the modules are only ever used in that function. Note that
loading a module the first time may be expensive because of the one time initialization of
the module, but loading a module multiple times is virtually free, costing only a couple of
dictionary  lookups. Even if the module name has gone out of scope, the module is
probably available in 
sys.modules
.
If only instances of a specific class use a module, then it is reasonable to import the
module in the class’s 
__init__
method and then assign the module to an instance
variable so that the module is always available (via that instance variable) during the life
of the object. Note that to delay an import until the class is instantiated, the import must
be inside a method. Putting the import inside the class but outside of any method still
causes the import to occur when the module is initialized.
How can I pass optional or keyword parameters from one function
to another?
Collect the arguments using the 
*
and 
**
specifiers in the function’s parameter list; this
gives you the positional arguments as a tuple and the keyword arguments as a dictionary.
You can then pass these arguments when calling another function by using 
*
and 
**
:
Create pdf the security level is set to high - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change security settings pdf; pdf file security
Create pdf the security level is set to high - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change security settings on pdf; secure pdf remove
def f(x, *args, **kwargs):
...
kwargs['width'= '14.3c'
...
g(x, *args, **kwargs)
In the unlikely case that you care about Python versions older than 2.0, use 
apply()
:
def f(x, *args, **kwargs):
...
kwargs['width'= '14.3c'
...
apply(g, (x,)+args, kwargs)
What is the difference between arguments and parameters?
Parameters are defined by the names that appear in a function definition, whereas
arguments are the values actually passed to a function when calling it. Parameters define
what  types  of  arguments  a  function  can accept. For example, given the function
definition:
def func(foo, bar=None**kwargs):
pass
foo, bar and kwargs are parameters of 
func
. However, when calling 
func
, for example:
func(42, bar=314, extra=somevar)
the values 
42
314
, and 
somevar
are arguments.
How do I write a function with output parameters (call by
reference)?
Remember that arguments are passed by assignment in Python. Since assignment just
creates references to objects, there’s no alias between an argument name in the caller
and callee, and so no call-by-reference per se. You can achieve the desired effect in a
number of ways.
1. By returning a tuple of the results:
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Set PDF security level. String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password passwordSetting.Level = EncryptionLevel.AES_128bit ' Print is allowed
pdf password security; pdf password unlock
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
PDF provides some PDF security settings. RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a password passwordSetting.Level = EncryptionLevel.AES_128bit; // Print is
decrypt pdf password; change pdf document security properties
def func2(a, b):
= 'new-value' # a and b are local names
= b + 1 # assigned to new objects
return a, b # return new values
x, y = 'old-value', 99
x, y = func2(x, y)
print x, y # output: new-value 100
This is almost always the clearest solution.
2. By using global variables. This isn’t thread-safe, and is not recommended.
3. By passing a mutable (changeable in-place) object:
def func1(a):
a[0= 'new-value' # 'a' references a mutable list
a[1= a[1+ 1 # changes a shared object
args = ['old-value', 99]
func1(args)
print args[0], args[1# output: new-value 100
4. By passing in a dictionary that gets mutated:
def func3(args):
args['a'= 'new-value' # args is a mutable dictionary
args['b'= args['b'+ 1 # change it in-place
args = {'a':' old-value', 'b'99}
func3(args)
print args['a'], args['b']
5. Or bundle up values in a class instance:
class callByRef:
def __init__(self**args):
for (key, value) in args.items():
setattr(self, key, value)
def func4(args):
args.= 'new-value' # args is a mutable callByRef
args.= args.b + 1 # change object in-place
args = callByRef(a='old-value', b=99)
func4(args)
print args.a, args.b
There’s almost never a good reason to get this complicated.
Your best choice is to return a tuple containing the multiple results.
How do you make a higher order function in Python?
You have two choices: you can use nested scopes or you can use callable objects. For
example, suppose you wanted to define 
linear(a,b)
which returns a function 
f(x)
that
computes the value 
a*x+b
. Using nested scopes:
def linear(a, b):
def result(x):
return a * x + b
return result
Or using a callable object:
class linear:
def __init__(self, a, b):
self.a, self.= a, b
def __call__(self, x):
return self.* x + self.b
In both cases,
taxes = linear(0.3, 2)
gives a callable object where 
taxes(10e6) == 0.3 * 10e6 + 2
.
The callable object approach has the disadvantage that it is a bit slower and results in
slightly longer code. However, note that a collection of callables can share their signature
via inheritance:
class exponential(linear):
# __init__ inherited
def __call__(self, x):
return self.* (x ** self.b)
Object can encapsulate state for several methods:
class counter:
value = 0
def set(self, x):
self.value = x
def up(self):
self.value = self.value + 1
def down(self):
self.value = self.value - 1
count = counter()
inc, dec, reset = count.up, count.down, count.set
Here 
inc()
dec()
and 
reset()
act like functions which share the same counting
variable.
How do I copy an object in Python?
In general, try 
copy.copy()
or 
copy.deepcopy()
for the general case. Not all objects can
be copied, but most can.
Some objects can be copied more easily. Dictionaries have a 
copy()
method:
newdict = olddict.copy()
Sequences can be copied by slicing:
new_l = l[:]
How can I find the methods or attributes of an object?
For an instance x of a user-defined class, 
dir(x)
returns an alphabetized list of the
names containing the instance attributes and methods and attributes defined by its class.
How can my code discover the name of an object?
Generally speaking, it can’t, because objects don’t really have names. Essentially,
assignment always binds a name to a value; The same is true of 
def
and 
class
statements, but in that case the value is a callable. Consider the following code:
class A:
pass
B = A
a = B()
b = a
print b
<__main__.A instance at 0x16D07CC>
print a
<__main__.A instance at 0x16D07CC>
Arguably the class has a name: even though it is bound to two names and invoked
through the name B the created instance is still reported as an instance of class A.
However, it is impossible to say whether the instance’s name is a or b, since both names
are bound to the same value.
Generally speaking it should not be necessary for your code to “know the names” of
particular values. Unless you are deliberately writing introspective programs, this is
usually an indication that a change of approach might be beneficial.
In comp.lang.python, Fredrik Lundh once gave an excellent analogy in answer to this
question:
The same way as you get the name of that cat you found on your porch: the cat
(object) itself cannot tell you its name, and it doesn’t really care – so the only way to
find out what it’s called is to ask all your neighbours (namespaces) if it’s their cat
(object)...
....and don’t be surprised if you’ll find that it’s known by many names, or no name at
all!
What’s up with the comma operator’s precedence?
Comma is not an operator in Python. Consider this session:
>>> "a" in "b""a"
(False, 'a')
Since the comma is not an operator, but a separator between expressions the above is
evaluated as if you had entered:
("a" in "b"), "a"
not:
"a" in ("b""a")
The same is true of the various assignment operators (
=
+=
etc). They are not truly
operators but syntactic delimiters in assignment statements.
Is there an equivalent of C’s ”?:” ternary operator?
Yes, this feature was added in Python 2.5. The syntax would be as follows:
[on_true] if [expression] else [on_false]
x, y = 50, 25
small = x if x < y else y
For versions previous to 2.5 the answer would be ‘No’.
Is it possible to write obfuscated one-liners in Python?
Yes. Usually this is done by nesting 
lambda
within 
lambda
. See the following three
examples, due to Ulf Bartelt:
# Primes < 1000
print filter(None,map(lambda y:y*reduce(lambda x,y:x*y!=0,
map(lambda x,y=y:y%x,range(2,int(pow(y,0.5)+1))),1),range(2,1000)))
# First 10 Fibonacci numbers
print map(lambda x,f=lambda x,f:(f(x-1,f)+f(x-2,f)) if x>1 else 1: f(x,f),
range(10))
# Mandelbrot set
print (lambda Ru,Ro,Iu,Io,IM,Sx,Sy:reduce(lambda x,y:x+y,map(lambda y,
Iu=Iu,Io=Io,Ru=Ru,Ro=Ro,Sy=Sy,L=lambda yc,Iu=Iu,Io=Io,Ru=Ru,Ro=Ro,i=IM,
Sx=Sx,Sy=Sy:reduce(lambda x,y:x+y,map(lambda x,xc=Ru,yc=yc,Ru=Ru,Ro=Ro,
i=i,Sx=Sx,F=lambda xc,yc,x,y,k,f=lambda xc,yc,x,y,k,f:(k<=0)or (x*x+y*y
>=4.0or 1+f(xc,yc,x*x-y*y+xc,2.0*x*y+yc,k-1,f):f(xc,yc,x,y,k,f):chr(
64+F(Ru+x*(Ro-Ru)/Sx,yc,0,0,i)),range(Sx))):L(Iu+y*(Io-Iu)/Sy),range(Sy
))))(-2.10.7-1.2, 1.230, 80, 24)
   \___ ___/  \___ ___/  |   |   |__ lines on screen
       V          V      |   |______ columns on screen
       |          |      |__________ maximum of "iterations"
       |          |_________________ range on y axis
       |____________________________ range on x axis
Don’t try this at home, kids!
Numbers and strings
How do I specify hexadecimal and octal integers?
To specify an octal digit, precede the octal value with a zero, and then a lower or
uppercase “o”. For example, to set the variable “a” to the octal value “10” (8 in decimal),
type:
>>> = 0o10
>>> a
8
Hexadecimal is just as easy. Simply precede the hexadecimal number with a zero, and
then a lower or uppercase “x”. Hexadecimal digits can be specified in lower or uppercase.
For example, in the Python interpreter:
>>> = 0xa5
>>> a
165
>>> = 0XB2
>>> b
178
Why does -22 // 10 return -3?
It’s primarily driven by the desire that 
i % j
have the same sign as 
j
. If you want that,
and also want:
== (i // j) * j + (i % j)
then integer division has to return the floor. C also requires that identity to hold, and then
compilers that truncate 
i // j
need to make 
i % j
have the same sign as 
i
.
There are few real use cases for 
i % j
when 
j
is negative. When 
j
is positive, there are
many, and in virtually all of them it’s more useful for 
i % j
to be 
>= 0
. If the clock says
10 now, what did it say 200 hours ago? 
-190 % 12 == 2
is useful; 
-190 % 12 == -10
is a
bug waiting to bite.
Note:  On Python 2, 
a / b
returns the same as 
a // b
if 
__future__.division
is not
in effect. This is also known as “classic” division.
How do I convert a string to a number?
For integers, use the built-in 
int()
type constructor, e.g. 
int('144') == 144
. Similarly,
float()
converts to floating-point, e.g. 
float('144') == 144.0
.
By default, these interpret the number as decimal, so that 
int('0144') == 144
and
int('0x144')
raises 
ValueError
int(string, base)
takes the base to convert from as a
second optional argument, so 
int('0x144', 16) == 324
. If the base is specified as 0, the
number is interpreted using Python’s rules: a leading ‘0’ indicates octal, and ‘0x’ indicates
a hex number.
Do not use the built-in function 
eval()
if all you need is to convert strings to numbers.
eval()
will be significantly slower and it presents a security risk: someone could pass you
a Python expression that might have unwanted side effects. For example, someone could
pass 
__import__('os').system("rm  -rf  $HOME")
which  would  erase  your  home
directory.
eval()
also has the effect of interpreting numbers as Python expressions, so that e.g.
eval('09')
gives a syntax error because Python regards numbers starting with ‘0’ as
octal (base 8).
How do I convert a number to a string?
To convert, e.g., the number 144 to the string ‘144’, use the built-in type constructor
str()
. If you want a hexadecimal or octal representation, use the built-in functions 
hex()
o r 
oct()
 For  fancy  formatting,  see  the Format String Syntax  section,  e.g. 
"
{:04d}".format(144)
yields 
'0144'
and 
"{:.3f}".format(1/3)
yields 
'0.333'
. You may
also use the % operator on strings. See the library reference manual for details.
How do I modify a string in place?
You can’t, because strings are immutable. If you need an object with this ability, try
converting the string to a list or use the array module:
>>> import io
>>> = "Hello, world"
>>> = list(s)
>>> print a
['H', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', ',', ' ', 'w', 'o', 'r', 'l', 'd']
>>> a[7:] = list("there!")
>>> ''.join(a)
'Hello, there!'
>>> import array
>>> = array.array('c', s)
>>> print a
array('c', 'Hello, world')
>>> a[0= 'y' ; print a
array('c', 'yello, world')
>>> a.tostring()
'yello, world'
How do I use strings to call functions/methods?
There are various techniques.
The best is to use a dictionary that maps strings to functions. The primary advantage
of this technique is that the strings do not need to match the names of the functions.
This is also the primary technique used to emulate a case construct:
def a():
pass
def b():
pass
dispatch = {'go': a, 'stop': b} # Note lack of parens for funcs
dispatch[get_input()]() # Note trailing parens to call function
Use the built-in function 
getattr()
:
import foo
getattr(foo, 'bar')()
Note  that 
getattr()
works on  any object, including  classes, class  instances,
modules, and so on.
This is used in several places in the standard library, like this:
class Foo:
def do_foo(self):
...
def do_bar(self):
...
= getattr(foo_instance, 'do_' + opname)
f()
Use 
locals()
or 
eval()
to resolve the function name:
def myFunc():
print "hello"
fname = "myFunc"
= locals()[fname]
f()
= eval(fname)
f()
Note: Using 
eval()
is slow and dangerous. If you don’t have absolute control over
the contents of the string, someone could pass a string that resulted in an arbitrary
function being executed.
Is there an equivalent to Perl’s chomp() for removing trailing
newlines from strings?
Starting with Python 2.2, you can use 
S.rstrip("\r\n")
to remove all occurrences of
any  line  terminator  from  the  end  of  the  string 
S
without  removing  other trailing
whitespace. If the string 
S
represents more than one line, with several empty lines at the
end, the line terminators for all the blank lines will be removed:
>>> lines = ("line 1 \r\n"
...  "\r\n"
...  "\r\n")
>>> lines.rstrip("\n\r")
'line 1 '
Since this is typically only desired when reading text one line at a time, using 
S.rstrip()
this way works well.
For older versions of Python, there are two partial substitutes:
If you want to remove all trailing whitespace, use the 
rstrip()
method of string
objects. This removes all trailing whitespace, not just a single newline.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested