convert pdf to jpg c# itextsharp : Create pdf security control Library platform web page .net windows web browser Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%2053-part1855

If not equal, the sequences are ordered the same as their first differing elements.
For  example, 
cmp([1,2,x],  [1,2,y])
returns  the  same  as 
cmp(x,y)
.  If  the
corresponding element does not exist, the shorter sequence is ordered first (for
example, 
[1,2] < [1,2,3]
).
Mappings (dictionaries) compare equal if and only if their sorted (key, value) lists
compare equal. [5] Outcomes other than equality are resolved consistently, but are
not otherwise defined. [6]
Most other objects of built-in types compare unequal unless they are the same
object; the choice whether one object is considered smaller or larger than another
one is made arbitrarily but consistently within one execution of a program.
The operators 
in
and 
not in
test for collection membership. 
x in s
evaluates to true if x
is a member of the collection s, and false otherwise. 
x not in s
returns the negation of 
x
in s
. The collection membership test has traditionally been bound to sequences; an
object is a member of a collection if the collection is a sequence and contains an element
equal to that object. However, it make sense for many other object types to support
membership tests without being a sequence. In particular, dictionaries (for keys) and sets
support membership testing.
For the list and tuple types, 
x in y
is true if and only if there exists an index i such that 
x
== y[i]
is true.
For the Unicode and string types, 
x in y
is true if and only if x is a substring of y. An
equivalent  test  is 
y.find(x) != -1
. Note, x  and y need not be the same type;
consequently, 
u'ab' in 'abc'
will return 
True
. Empty strings are always considered to
be a substring of any other string, so 
"" in "abc"
will return 
True
.
Changed in version 2.3: Previously, x was required to be a string of length 
1
.
For user-defined classes which define the 
__contains__()
method, 
x in y
is true if and
only if 
y.__contains__(x)
is true.
For user-defined classes which do not define 
__contains__()
but do define 
__iter__()
,
x in y
is true if some value 
z
with 
x == z
is produced while iterating over 
y
. If an
exception is raised during the iteration, it is as if 
in
raised that exception.
Lastly, the old-style iteration protocol is tried: if a class defines 
__getitem__()
x in y
is
true if and only if there is a non-negative integer index i such that 
x == y[i]
, and all
lower integer indices do not raise 
IndexError
exception. (If any other exception is raised,
Create pdf security - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf password encryption; pdf security password
Create pdf security - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
add security to pdf; decrypt pdf online
it is as if 
in
raised that exception).
The operator 
not in
is defined to have the inverse true value of 
in
.
The operators 
is
and 
is not
test for object identity: 
x is y
is true if and only if x and y
are the same object. 
x is not y
yields the inverse truth value. [7]
5.10. Boolean operations
or_test  ::=  and_test | or_test "or" and_test
and_test ::=  not_test | and_test "and" not_test
not_test ::=  comparison | "not" not_test
In the context of Boolean operations, and also when expressions are used by control flow
statements, the following values are interpreted as false: 
False
None
, numeric zero of all
types, and empty strings and containers (including strings, tuples, lists, dictionaries, sets
and frozensets). All other values are interpreted as true. (See the 
__nonzero__()
special
method for a way to change this.)
The operator 
not
yields 
True
if its argument is false, 
False
otherwise.
The expression 
x and y
first evaluates x; if x is false, its value is returned; otherwise, y is
evaluated and the resulting value is returned.
The expression 
x or y
first evaluates x; if x is true, its value is returned; otherwise, y is
evaluated and the resulting value is returned.
(Note that neither 
and
nor 
or
restrict the value and type they return to 
False
and 
True
,
but rather return the last evaluated argument. This is sometimes useful, e.g., if 
s
is a
string that should be replaced by a default value if it is empty, the expression 
s or 'foo'
yields the desired value. Because 
not
has to invent a value anyway, it does not bother to
return a value of the same type as its argument, so e.g., 
not 'foo'
yields 
False
, not 
''
.)
5.11. Conditional Expressions
New in version 2.5.
conditional_expression ::=  or_test ["if" or_test "else" expression]
expression             ::=  conditional_expression | lambda_expr
Conditional expressions (sometimes called a “ternary operator”) have the lowest priority
of all Python operations.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Set PDF security level. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password
secure pdf file; add security to pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to create a password protected PDF contains file permission limitation. your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
add security to pdf in reader; pdf security remover
The expression 
x if C else y
first evaluates the condition, C (not x); if C is true, x is
evaluated and its value is returned; otherwise, y is evaluated and its value is returned.
See PEP 308 for more details about conditional expressions.
5.12. Lambdas
lambda_expr     ::=  "lambda" [parameter_list]: expression
old_lambda_expr ::=  "lambda" [parameter_list]: old_expression
Lambda expressions (sometimes called lambda forms) have the same syntactic position
as expressions. They are a shorthand to create anonymous functions; the expression
lambda arguments: expression
yields a function object. The unnamed object behaves
like a function object defined with
def name(arguments):
return expression
See section Function definitions for the syntax of parameter lists. Note that functions
created with lambda expressions cannot contain statements.
5.13. Expression lists
expression_list ::=  expression ( "," expression )* [","]
An expression list containing at least one comma yields a tuple. The length of the tuple is
the number of expressions in the list. The expressions are evaluated from left to right.
The trailing comma is required only to create a single tuple (a.k.a. a singleton); it is
optional in all other cases. A single expression without a trailing comma doesn’t create a
tuple, but rather yields the value of that expression. (To create an empty tuple, use an
empty pair of parentheses: 
()
.)
5.14. Evaluation order
Python  evaluates  expressions  from  left  to  right.  Notice  that  while  evaluating  an
assignment, the right-hand side is evaluated before the left-hand side.
In the following lines, expressions will be evaluated in the arithmetic order of their
suffixes:
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
into Multiple ones. You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. We have a privacy
pdf security; decrypt pdf file
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
copy text from encrypted pdf; create secure pdf online
expr1, expr2, expr3, expr4
(expr1, expr2, expr3, expr4)
{expr1: expr2, expr3: expr4}
expr1 + expr2 * (expr3 - expr4)
expr1(expr2, expr3, *expr4, **expr5)
expr3, expr4 = expr1, expr2
5.15. Operator precedence
The following table  summarizes the  operator precedences  in Python,  from lowest
precedence (least binding) to highest precedence (most binding). Operators in the same
box have the same precedence. Unless the syntax is explicitly given, operators are
binary. Operators in the same box group left to right (except for comparisons, including
tests, which all have the same precedence and chain from left to right — see section
Comparisons — and exponentiation, which groups from right to left).
Operator
Description
lambda
Lambda expression
if
– 
else
Conditional expression
or
Boolean OR
and
Boolean AND
not
x
Boolean NOT
in
not in
is
is not
<
<=
>
>=
<>
!=
==
Comparisons, including membership
tests and identity tests
|
Bitwise OR
^
Bitwise XOR
&
Bitwise AND
<<
>>
Shifts
+
-
Addition and subtraction
*
/
//
%
Multiplication, division, remainder [8]
+x
-x
~x
Positive, negative, bitwise NOT
**
Exponentiation [9]
x[index]
x[index:index]
x(arguments...)
,
x.attribute
Subscription, slicing, call, attribute
reference
(expressions...)
[expressions...]
{key:
value...}
`expressions...`
Binding or tuple display, list display,
dictionary display, string conversion
Footnotes
[1]
In Python 2.3 and later releases, a list comprehension “leaks” the control variables of
each 
for
it contains into the containing scope. However, this behavior is deprecated,
and relying on it will not work in Python 3.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
All. Create a New AzureCloudService Project in RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
change pdf security settings reader; convert secure webpage to pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
Create a New ASP.NET MVC3 RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. validateIntegratedM odeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering allowDoubleEscaping
change pdf document security; pdf security settings
[2]
While 
abs(x%y) < abs(y)
is true mathematically, for floats it may not be true
numerically due to roundoff. For example, and assuming a platform on which a
Python float is an IEEE 754 double-precision number, in order that 
-1e-100 % 1e100
have the same sign as 
1e100
, the computed result is 
-1e-100 + 1e100
, which is
numerically exactly equal to 
1e100
. The function 
math.fmod()
returns a result whose
sign matches the sign of the first argument instead, and so returns 
-1e-100
in this
case. Which approach is more appropriate depends on the application.
[3]
If x is very close to an exact integer multiple of y, it’s possible for 
floor(x/y)
to be
one larger than 
(x-x%y)/y
due to rounding. In such cases, Python returns the latter
result, in order to preserve that 
divmod(x,y)[0] * y + x % y
be very close to 
x
.
[4]
While comparisons between unicode strings make sense at the byte level, they may
be counter-intuitive to users. For example, the strings 
u"\u00C7"
and
u"\u0043\u0327"
compare differently, even though they both represent the same
unicode character (LATIN CAPITAL LETTER C WITH CEDILLA). To compare strings
in a human recognizable way, compare using 
unicodedata.normalize()
.
[5] The implementation computes this efficiently, without constructing lists or sorting.
[6]
Earlier versions of Python used lexicographic comparison of the sorted (key, value)
lists, but this was very expensive for the common case of comparing for equality. An
even earlier version of Python compared dictionaries by identity only, but this caused
surprises because people expected to be able to test a dictionary for emptiness by
comparing it to 
{}
.
[7]
Due to automatic garbage-collection, free lists, and the dynamic nature of
descriptors, you may notice seemingly unusual behaviour in certain uses of the 
is
operator, like those involving comparisons between instance methods, or constants.
Check their documentation for more info.
[8] The 
%
operator is also used for string formatting; the same precedence applies.
[9]
The power operator 
**
binds less tightly than an arithmetic or bitwise unary operator
on its right, that is, 
2**-1
is 
0.5
.
index
modules |
next |
previous |
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Language Reference »
© Copyright
1990-2013, Python Software Foundation. 
The Python Software Foundation is a non-profit corporation. Please donate.
Last updated on Nov 10, 2013. Found a bug
Created using Sphinx
1.0.7.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
allows users to perform PDF document security settings in added to a specific location on PDF file page. In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete
can print pdf security; secure pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Security PDF component download. You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and output a new PDF file.
creating secure pdf files; change security settings pdf
index
modules |
next |
previous |
6. Simple statements
Simple statements are comprised within a single logical line. Several simple statements
may occur on a single line separated by semicolons. The syntax for simple statements is:
simple_stmt ::=  expression_stmt
assert_stmt
assignment_stmt
augmented_assignment_stmt
pass_stmt
del_stmt
print_stmt
return_stmt
yield_stmt
raise_stmt
break_stmt
continue_stmt
import_stmt
global_stmt
exec_stmt
6.1. Expression statements
Expression statements are used (mostly interactively) to compute and write a value, or
(usually) to call a procedure (a function that returns no meaningful result; in Python,
procedures return the value 
None
). Other uses of expression statements are allowed and
occasionally useful. The syntax for an expression statement is:
expression_stmt ::=  expression_list
An  expression  statement  evaluates  the  expression  list  (which  may  be  a  single
expression).
In interactive mode, if the value is not 
None
, it is converted to a string using the built-in
repr()
function and the resulting string is written to standard output (see section The
print statement) on a line by itself. (Expression statements yielding 
None
are not written,
so that procedure calls do not cause any output.)
6.2. Assignment statements
Assignment statements are used to (re)bind names to values and to modify attributes or
items of mutable objects:
Python » Python v2.7.6 documentation » The Python Language Reference »
assignment_stmt ::=  (target_list "=")+ (expression_list | yield_expression)
target_list     ::=  target ("," target)* [","]
target          ::=  identifier
| "(" target_list ")"
| "[" target_list "]"
attributeref
subscription
slicing
(See section Primaries for the syntax definitions for the last three symbols.)
An assignment statement evaluates the expression list (remember that this can be a
single expression or a comma-separated list, the latter yielding a tuple) and assigns the
single resulting object to each of the target lists, from left to right.
Assignment is defined recursively depending on the form of the target (list). When a
target is part of a mutable object (an attribute reference, subscription or slicing), the
mutable object must ultimately perform the assignment and decide about its validity, and
may raise an exception if the assignment is unacceptable. The rules observed by various
types and the exceptions raised are given with the definition of the object types (see
section The standard type hierarchy).
Assignment of an object to a target list is recursively defined as follows.
If the target list is a single target: The object is assigned to that target.
If the target list is a comma-separated list of targets: The object must be an iterable
with the same number of items as there are targets in the target list, and the items
are assigned, from left to right, to the corresponding targets.
Assignment of an object to a single target is recursively defined as follows.
If the target is an identifier (name):
If the name does not occur in a 
global
statement in the current code block: the
name is bound to the object in the current local namespace.
Otherwise: the name is bound to the object in the current global namespace.
The name is rebound if it was already bound. This may cause the reference count for
the object previously bound to the name to reach zero, causing the object to be
deallocated and its destructor (if it has one) to be called.
If the target is a target list enclosed in parentheses or in square brackets: The object
must be an iterable with the same number of items as there are targets in the target
list, and its items are assigned, from left to right, to the corresponding targets.
If the target is an attribute reference: The primary expression in the reference is
evaluated. It should yield an object with assignable attributes; if this is not the case,
TypeError
is raised. That object is then asked to assign the assigned object to the
given attribute; if it cannot perform the assignment, it raises an exception (usually but
not necessarily 
AttributeError
).
Note: If the object is a class instance and the attribute reference occurs on both
sides of the assignment operator, the RHS expression, 
a.x
can access either an
instance attribute or (if no instance attribute exists) a class attribute. The LHS target
a.x
is always set as an instance attribute, creating it if necessary. Thus, the two
occurrences  of 
a.x
do not necessarily refer to the same attribute: if the RHS
expression refers to a class attribute, the LHS creates a new instance attribute as
the target of the assignment:
class Cls:
= 3 # class variable
inst = Cls()
inst.= inst.x + 1 # writes inst.x as 4 leaving Cls.x as 3
This  description  does  not  necessarily  apply  to  descriptor  attributes,  such  as
properties created with 
property()
.
If the target is a subscription: The primary expression in the reference is evaluated. It
should yield either a mutable sequence object (such as a list) or a mapping object
(such as a dictionary). Next, the subscript expression is evaluated.
If the primary is a mutable sequence object (such as a list), the subscript must yield
a plain integer. If it is negative, the sequence’s length is added to it. The resulting
value must be a nonnegative integer less than the sequence’s length, and the
sequence is asked to assign the assigned object to its item with that index. If the
index is out of range, 
IndexError
is raised (assignment to a subscripted sequence
cannot add new items to a list).
If the primary is a mapping object (such as a dictionary), the subscript must have a
type compatible with the mapping’s key type, and the mapping is then asked to
create a key/datum pair which maps the subscript to the assigned object. This can
either replace an existing key/value pair with the same key value, or insert a new
key/value pair (if no key with the same value existed).
If the target is a slicing: The primary expression in the reference is evaluated. It
should yield a mutable sequence object (such as a list). The assigned object should
be  a  sequence  object  of  the  same  type. Next, the  lower  and  upper  bound
expressions are evaluated, insofar they are present; defaults are zero and the
sequence’s length. The bounds should evaluate to (small) integers. If either bound is
negative, the sequence’s length is added to it. The resulting bounds are clipped to lie
between zero and the sequence’s length, inclusive. Finally, the sequence object is
asked to replace the slice with the items of the assigned sequence. The length of the
slice may be different from the length of the assigned sequence, thus changing the
length of the target sequence, if the object allows it.
CPython implementation detail: In the current implementation, the syntax for targets
is taken to be the same as for expressions, and invalid syntax is rejected during the
code generation phase, causing less detailed error messages.
WARNING: Although the definition of assignment implies that overlaps between the left-
hand side and the right-hand side are ‘safe’ (for example 
a, b = b, a
swaps two
variables),  overlaps within the collection of assigned-to variables are not safe! For
instance, the following program prints 
[0, 2]
:
= [0, 1]
= 0
i, x[i] = 1, 2
print x
6.2.1. Augmented assignment statements
Augmented assignment is the combination, in a single statement, of a binary operation
and an assignment statement:
augmented_assignment_stmt ::=  augtarget augop (expression_list | yield_expression
augtarget                 ::=  identifier | attributeref | subscription | slicing
augop                     ::=  "+=" | "-=" | "*=" | "/=" | "//=" | "%=" | "**="
| ">>=" | "<<=" | "&=" | "^=" | "|="
(See section Primaries for the syntax definitions for the last three symbols.)
An  augmented assignment  evaluates  the  target (which, unlike  normal assignment
statements, cannot be an unpacking) and the expression list, performs the binary
operation specific to the type of assignment on the two operands, and assigns the result
to the original target. The target is only evaluated once.
An augmented assignment expression like 
x += 1
can be rewritten as 
x = x + 1
to
achieve a similar, but not exactly equal effect. In the augmented version, 
x
is only
evaluated once. Also, when possible, the actual operation is performed in-place, meaning
that rather than creating a new object and assigning that to the target, the old object is
modified instead.
With the exception of assigning to tuples and multiple targets in a single statement, the
assignment done by augmented assignment statements is handled the same way as
normal assignments. Similarly, with the exception of the possible in-place behavior, the
binary operation performed by augmented assignment is the same as the normal binary
operations.
For targets which are attribute references, the same caveat about class and instance
attributes applies as for regular assignments.
6.3. The 
assert
statement
Assert statements are a convenient way to insert debugging assertions into a program:
assert_stmt ::=  "assert" expression ["," expression]
The simple form, 
assert expression
, is equivalent to
if __debug__:
if not expression: raise AssertionError
The extended form, 
assert expression1, expression2
, is equivalent to
if __debug__:
if not expression1: raise AssertionError(expression2)
These equivalences assume that 
__debug__
and 
AssertionError
refer to the built-in
variables with those names. In the current implementation, the built-in variable 
__debug__
is 
True
under normal circumstances, 
False
when optimization is requested (command
line option -O). The current code generator emits no code for an assert statement when
optimization is requested at compile time. Note that it is unnecessary to include the
source code for the expression that failed in the error message; it will be displayed as
part of the stack trace.
Assignments to 
__debug__
are illegal. The value for the built-in variable is determined
when the interpreter starts.
6.4. The 
pass
statement
pass_stmt ::=  "pass"
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested